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Can anyone tell me if this new grain which is supposed to be an ancient grain called einkom is safe for celiacs and gluten intolerance?

I would like to try it and tell others about it but want to be sure first if it is

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I saw someone on TV yesterday saying this is good for "gluten intolerants". To me, its still wheat and I wouldn't risk it without alot of testing by a reliable source (the lady on Dr Oz is not a reliable source in my mind).

"Einkorn wheat (from German Einkorn, literally "single grain") can refer either to the wild species of wheat, Triticum boeoticum (the spelling baeoticum is also common), or to the domesticated form, Triticum monococcum. The wild and domesticated forms are either considered separate species, as here, or as subspecies of T. monococcum. Einkorn is a diploid species of hulled wheat, with tough glumes ('husks') that tightly enclose the grains. The cultivated form is similar to the wild, except that the ear stays intact when ripe and the seeds are larger.

Einkorn wheat was one of the earliest cultivated forms of wheat, alongside emmer wheat (T. dicoccum). Grains of wild einkorn have been found in Epi-Paleolithic sites of the Fertile Crescent. It was first domesticated approximately 7500 BC (7050 BC ≈ 9000 BP), in the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) or B (PPNB) periods.[1] Evidence from DNA finger-printing suggests einkorn was domesticated near Karaca Dağ in southeast Turkey, an area in which a number of PPNB farming villages have been found.[2] Its cultivation decreased in the Bronze Age, and today it is a relict crop that is rarely planted, though it has found a new market as a health food. It remains as a local crop, often for bulgur (cracked wheat) or as animal feed, in mountainous areas of France, Morocco, the former Yugoslavia, Turkey and other countries. It often survives on poor soils where other species of wheat fail.[3"

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If you mean einkorn, yes, it is hulled wheat, I believe.

(whoops, Karen and I posted simultaneously!! :) )

There is no conclusive evidence (that I have read) that says it is safe for celiacs.

ONE study says the lesser amount of gliadin in it "may render" it "less toxic" for celiacs, but I would't risk it. No way!

Wheat is wheat in my book.

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Can anyone tell me if this new grain which is supposed to be an ancient grain called einkom is safe for celiacs and gluten intolerance?

I would like to try it and tell others about it but want to be sure first if it is

Found this article for you!

It is definitely NOT safe--as we suspected.

http://celiacdisease.about.com/b/2011/03/23/is-einkorn-wheat-gluten-free-labels-claim-yes.htm

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