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Can'tEvenEatRice!

A Must Read!

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This is a FANTASTIC example of how there definitely needs to be more research done to determine the relationship between certain genes and Celiac Disease:

http://www.glutensensitivity.net/cases.htm#Allison

VERY interesting....everytime i think im getting a grip on understanding celiac- a hairpin turn is around the bend- im sure the medical field feels the same way, wait celiac isn't even on their radar....if it was there would be way way more scientific understanding of this disease....

thanks for the good read

~breann

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This has actually been known about for quite a while, if you look at the studies done on genetic typing, but the doctors sure like to read 98%'s as 100%'s.... :angry:


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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This is a FANTASTIC example of how there definitely needs to be more research done to determine the relationship between certain genes and Celiac Disease:

http://www.glutensensitivity.net/cases.htm#Allison

Agree completely. Look how many people are on this site with DQ1 (myself included). This is not a matter of "us" (celiacs, DQ2, DQ8) vs. "them" (non-celiacs, gluten sensitive or not), but rather we all suffer the affects of gluten. Whether we see a loved one experience it, or our insurance bills skyrocket due to millions who are undiagnosed and the myriad of diseases associated with it, or our taxes increase due to special education funds for undiagnosed children requiring additional assistance, we all pay a price. Look at the studies that show the numbers of celiac sufferers in our prisons and mental health institutions. Staggering. Sobering. Upsetting.


gluten-free since 5/03, dx w/positive bx 5/03, neg. labs 7/03

DQB1,1 (subtype 6,6).

Hashimotos/Graves thyroiditis (ablated), osteoporosis, and too many more to mention.

casein free/dairy free 11/05, since positive enterolab casein test

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Interesting article.

We all have active intolerance from enterolab and although our numbers were low I'm glad we went gluten free before all the damage hit. We all have at least one celiac gene.

Everyone needs to decide if a challenge is worth it to them (their family member).


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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