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imagine22

Any Reason Not To Make Undiagnosed 16mth Old gluten-free?

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I have celiac and my daughter is 16mths and has occaisional dioreah (ie once a week) which often (but not always)corresponds with a visit to grandmas which is not gluten free ie she has bread for lunch. is there any reason i should not make her gluten free just in case?

She eats gluten free 95% of the time alreqady as i only cook gluten free foods it would just be telling others not to feed her gluten also. is there any disadvantage to doing this? i was thinking i would have her gluten free until she was say 3-4years and could do a gluten challenge and have the various tests then.

The reason is that I had stunted growth as a child i think due to celiac and delayed development also my brother and at least one cousin have aspergers and im concerned their problems may be linked to celiac in my family - my brother tested neg for celiac though (he also was born with a cleft palate) as did my mother who has lactose intollerance, fatigue, bloating, weight problems, depression. various family members on that side also have lactose intollerance, depression, weight issues etc.

Am i just way too paranoid? my dr didnt even think i needed to be totally gluten-free and i had blood test and biopsy proven celiac! (btw since gluten free i never felt better! I never knew what normal was before).

alternately should i have her do a gluten challenge after say 6mths of gluten free? I dont think theres much point having her do a blood test or biopsy since she has been almost gluten free for 3 months now.

any advice appreciated.

thanks,

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Guest Villanfam

Hi, I have 3 children and all 3 of have celiac disease, as do I. We found out on Sept 14 this year. My Beautiful Son is 8yrs old and has had Developmental Delays (Auditory Processing Delays, Autism-Aspergers Syndrome, ADHD) seizures, has had to work with an occupational therapist just so he could hold an pencil properly and use scissors (still can't tie his shoes or peddle a bike), achy legs, headaches, night sweats, and is still unable to read.

My Wonderful Daughter is 5yrs old, smart as a whip, but has extreme emotional issues (depression, possible mood disorder) and is extremely defiant, beyond what is normal for any 5yr old.

My Baby Girl will be 3yrs on Sat. and looks like an ethiopian baby. She weighs 23lbs!!! and was taken to the E.R on Christmas Eve for what the Doctors think might have been a seizure! they have been gluten free since 9/14/06.

They have not been having any of their previous G.I. symptoms but the neurological ones are still there. I don't know if they will ever recover from them, all I can do is wait.

My question to you is "Is it worth possibly causing more damage to her intestines, brain, other organs (as it is systemic) to have a confirmed diagnosis?" Gluten is not necessary, to be healthy. There are 3 things that need to happen to develop the disease. 1) genetic predisposition 2) gluten in your diet 3) a trigger (illness, injury, surgery, emotional trauma ect.) If there is no gluten in her diet, then she will likely not ever develop the disease. I know for me that when my husband and I try for baby#4 that he/she will never know the taste of or the debilitating effects gluten can have on ones body.

As Mom's we have guilt over everything with our kids :rolleyes: I have guilt that I never saw a Dr. for my many problems as a child and even more as an adult. I never thought my kids had the same problems as me (they had no vomiting/diarrhea after ingesting gluten) I still cry daily with the knowledge of what gluten has done to them. I will not ever make the same mistake again. I'd rather error on the side of caution.

Good luck with whatever you decide,

Courtney

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Courtney is right. You have celiac disease. You know your daughter reacts to gluten. You have enough evidence to know that she should be kept away from gluten. Just have her be gluten-free with you. And please, for her sake, don't ever do a gluten challenge, it could cause irreparable damage!

There are advantages to not having an official diagnosis. Some people here have been denied private health insurance because of their diagnosis. You might even be denied life insurance. If your daughter doesn't have an 'official' diagnosis, she won't ever have those problems.

And Courtney, it isn't your fault. You didn't know. Your doctors should have known, but were clueless. You are a good mother. Just do the best you can with your beautiful children, love them, and keep them gluten-free as best as you are able. That is all you can do.

I didn't learn to read until I was eight years old. Once I grasped the concept of reading, I instantly became the best reader and speller in my class! And was all through the rest of my schooling. I have Asperger Syndrome, too. Your son will be okay. Maybe different (which is fine, as far as I am concerned), but just as beautiful as so-called 'normal' kids.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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I don't think the exact question has been answered as to if there is any reason why she shouldn't be on a gluten-free diet. IMO, a gluten-free diet is often healthier than a normal diet - assuming you stick to a diet full of whole, naturally gluten-free foods with occasional prepackaged gluten-free foods as a treat. My diet is full of fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, healthy fats and whole grains such as brown rice. I occasionally eat potatoes and sweet potatoes (I don't avoid them intentionally, I just don't prefer them over rice and corn).

I think there is no reason to not go gluten-free if you suspect it. Likely, your daughter will follow a healthier diet because of it.


ELIZABETH

gluten-free (04.17.2006)

corn-free (03.27.2007)

xanthan gum-free

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Hi . I have a 15 month that is a negative tester when it comes to gluten... but instead of "loose bowels" He vomits.

He wont become positive till I start a wheat diet. ( which wont happen... any time soon)

See I took him of of all gluten early on.... he vomited every time he ate baby cereal ... violently... at 5 months...

If you think your baby is Celaic ... and you dont go gluten free.... the specialist told me point blank ..that children tend to grow up with stomache and intestional cancer.

I would go gluten free... but you need the gluten to make a positive test. But like everyone has said... If there is a diagnosis... insurance becomes a pre exisiting condition.

But I would go gluten free.... your safe..... that way... at least untill death defying proof.

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Guest cassidy

I agree with everyone else, I don't think there is a reason not to make her gluten-free. Since she eats at home most of the time it probably isn't that much of an issue at her age. There are plenty of people here who have gluten-free households even when there are one or more people that don't have a problem with gluten. I still would think that D isn't normal, especially when followed by trips of gluteny places, so she probably is having a problem with gluten anyway.

I also think it is a good idea to do a gluten challenge when she gets older. I think it would be tough to be on the diet when you get to the birthday party and school age if you really don't have to. You may not need to do a challenge though, if you make her gluten-free and her D goes away completely, then you probably have your answer without making her eat gluten on purpose.

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Guest Villanfam
I didn't learn to read until I was eight years old. Once I grasped the concept of reading, I instantly became the best reader and speller in my class! And was all through the rest of my schooling. I have Asperger Syndrome, too. Your son will be okay. Maybe different (which is fine, as far as I am concerned), but just as beautiful as so-called 'normal' kids.

Thank you for saying that. He actually is a pretty amazing speller. It's just getting him to read that's been tricky. He is very stubborn and says "I never want to read, EVER , I HATE IT :angry: ! LOL I tell him that if he ever wants to be a Paleontologist (HE LOVES, LOVES, LOVES DINOSAURS) he has to be able to read. We are working on it with him. He is brilliant with math and science and anything to do with nature. His teachers and aids really love him dearly, he is so sweet, and funny as all get out. And absolutely stunning to look at. Really, just gorgeous :wub: !! (in my humble opinion :rolleyes: )

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