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Nathan's mom

Elisa Test - Need Advice

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Hi,

I want to have my son tested through York for the ELISA food intolerance test. Did anyone purchase theirs online from them directly? Or did you use a reputable distributor here in the U.S.? I'm not sure if my insurance will cover so I'm just going to do it. We already had an appointment with the allergist and it is clear she thinks there is "no correlation" between removing foods pinpointed by an IGg response and behavior.

Thanks for the help!

Debbie


Mom to Nathan (5) and Joshua (6 months).

Nathan diagnosed Celiac through positive dietary response and bloodwork.

In search of the best gluten free recipes. I get discouraged, then pick up the measuring cup again and try some more.

Praying Nathan has a good year in Kindergarten!

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My doctor (who is a MD gone more holistic) uses US Biotek for ELISA tests. I went through him and did them.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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I am also interested in getting some testing done. Is ELISA the best test you think? Is it reliable? Or are people just as skeptical to that as EnteroLab?


One Celiac gene and one gluten intolerance gene (HLA-DQ 2,1).

Grain free, casein free, soy/legume free + a bunch of allergies I have had since I was a child (stone fruits, nuts..carrots)

Following the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, but no nuts, legumes or casein.

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I am also interested in getting some testing done. Is ELISA the best test you think? Is it reliable? Or are people just as skeptical to that as EnteroLab?

It can have false positives (I'm not sure about false negatives). It helps to pinpoint things and make an elimination diet easier to start since you know what to eliminate. Otherwise just go on a basic elimination diet and add in one food every 4-7 days (after at least 2 weeks of starting elimination diet).


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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It can have false positives (I'm not sure about false negatives). It helps to pinpoint things and make an elimination diet easier to start since you know what to eliminate. Otherwise just go on a basic elimination diet and add in one food every 4-7 days (after at least 2 weeks of starting elimination diet).

I have kinda tried eliminating things and it hasn't made me all that wiser. Some stuff I figured out, but I seem to not like a lot of stuff and sometimes one things works and doesn't work after I have had it a couple of times.. I also would like to check my old allergies. See if any of it changed (stone fruits among other things). I guess ELISA doesn't do allergies? More for intolerance&sensitivities it sounds like?

Thanks for your reply.


One Celiac gene and one gluten intolerance gene (HLA-DQ 2,1).

Grain free, casein free, soy/legume free + a bunch of allergies I have had since I was a child (stone fruits, nuts..carrots)

Following the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, but no nuts, legumes or casein.

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I am also interested in getting some testing done. Is ELISA the best test you think? Is it reliable? Or are people just as skeptical to that as EnteroLab?

I guess it is a good test if you are having trouble pinpointing intolerances. I had my son go to an allergist last week just to rule out any classical (histamine) responses. I was pretty sure there were none. As it turns out he has a small reaction to garlic and cinnamon. Not really worried about that. His behavior at times seems triggered by food (or something - too many mood swings). :ph34r:

I've already gone down the elimination diet path and it was not fun with a 3 year old. I didn't know he had a gluten sensitivity and probably celiac (pos. Ttg). The gluten was a mask covering up anything else. It was so negative to see how sick he got and I probably helped to trigger it because of all the whole wheat bread, bagels, etc. he was consuming. Wheat was generally "safe" on this elimination diet. :(

The allergist said (and yes, she is negative as most traditional docs are to the test) that any allergy/intolerance test can give false positives but a negative is a negative (however, some celiacs would disagree with that, huh?). Anyway, for me it will be helpful to just know which foods MIGHT be causing problems. Then I can eliminate those for awhile and one by one reintroduce and challenge them. I'm tired of guessing - did he not have enough sleep? Is he just not gluten free long enough? Was it the beef? Was it the grapes? etc., etc., etc., I'm done with excluding food from his diet because I THINK it might be causing problems. He needs vitamins and nutrients to heal.

So...it will be helpful even if it only helps with one more piece of the puzzle.

I want to use York Laboratories, but they are in Europe and I'm not sure I can get it from them. I've just read that they are good. I read a review about one company (not sure which) selling a test through Amazon. However, the review was terrible because the person never got their money back, no results, and the BBB never heard of them. Yikes! By the way, it is still listed on Amazon, but just "not available at this time" if you are interested in looking up which one it is.

Anyone have any thoughts on which test and from where would be appreciated!

Thanks!


Mom to Nathan (5) and Joshua (6 months).

Nathan diagnosed Celiac through positive dietary response and bloodwork.

In search of the best gluten free recipes. I get discouraged, then pick up the measuring cup again and try some more.

Praying Nathan has a good year in Kindergarten!

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I have so "proper" allergies that I need to go and check again. I was tested like 13 years ago last time. I need to see if anything has changed.

..and like you I am tired of guessing.

It is very hard when the doctors can't agree on tests. It doesn't make things very easy.


One Celiac gene and one gluten intolerance gene (HLA-DQ 2,1).

Grain free, casein free, soy/legume free + a bunch of allergies I have had since I was a child (stone fruits, nuts..carrots)

Following the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, but no nuts, legumes or casein.

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