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Mickide

How To Help A Teen Adjust?

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My younger sister (16) and brother (13) recently have had positive bloodwork. They have not seen the GI yet and have to wait until Nov/Dec for they're appts. I don't think there is much question on wether they have it or not seeing as I have celiacs. Are there any resources to help teens adjust? I had a hard enough time myself in my 30's, I can't image how tough it is going to be for them. My brother is active in boy scouts, my sister in band, etc.. Not to mention bouncing back and forth between my mom's and my dad's.

I am just trying to compile some info for them to help them get started.

Also my other sis in her 30's is getting tested next week, although she already tested positive for a wheat and gluten intolerance a few years ago. Not sure how that test is different but she does not comply to a gluten free diet. So it looks like there is a good possibility that 4 out of 4 kids have it!

Thanks!!

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Hello,

I am 17 and was dx'd in May after a long list of health problems finally led to the diagnosis. It will be difficult for them to adjust, but they have you and your support. I am also starting a teen support group in the Los Angeles area, so if you want to give either or both of them my email address, feel free. It is knshore@hotmail.com I would be more than willing to give them support because I went through a hard time when I first went gluten-free and didn't have anyone to talk to about it. The biggest thing is for them to try to not eat many gluten-free replacement foods when they are healing. Also, don't overdose on any one thing. For example, I also was dairy free and was using a lot of soy replacements for dairy, but then I developed an intolerance to soy because I ate so much of it. This is very common in this thread and other celiacs I know. Overall, this diet has been a great change for me, I have the healthiest diet out of all of my friends. They all are jealous of my good lunches because they eat wonder bread with bolonga. LOL! :D Also, make sure your parents are together on them being gluten-free (even though I think you said they're divorced.) Your parents will need to make sure there is always food for them to eat such as granola bars, etc. It is definitely going to take a little, okay A LOT of adjustment, but this is the best diagnosis to me. The prescription is to change your diet!!! It's not like we are stuck to 25849743 pills a day. Again, please feel free to have them email me, or if you want to, I am more than happy to help.

I thought of something else, is there any way YOU could take them shopping and show them things that they can eat and have them read the labels so they understand what they can and cannot eat. The list on this sites "site index" is a great list to help with label reading.

Good luck and it's great to see your concern! :)

Kassandra

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Hello,

I am 17 and was dx'd in May after a long list of health problems finally led to the diagnosis. It will be difficult for them to adjust, but they have you and your support. I am also starting a teen support group in the Los Angeles area, so if you want to give either or both of them my email address, feel free. It is knshore@hotmail.com I would be more than willing to give them support because I went through a hard time when I first went gluten-free and didn't have anyone to talk to about it. The biggest thing is for them to try to not eat many gluten-free replacement foods when they are healing. Also, don't overdose on any one thing. For example, I also was dairy free and was using a lot of soy replacements for dairy, but then I developed an intolerance to soy because I ate so much of it. This is very common in this thread and other celiacs I know. Overall, this diet has been a great change for me, I have the healthiest diet out of all of my friends. They all are jealous of my good lunches because they eat wonder bread with bolonga. LOL! :D Also, make sure your parents are together on them being gluten-free (even though I think you said they're divorced.) Your parents will need to make sure there is always food for them to eat such as granola bars, etc. It is definitely going to take a little, okay A LOT of adjustment, but this is the best diagnosis to me. The prescription is to change your diet!!! It's not like we are stuck to 25849743 pills a day. Again, please feel free to have them email me, or if you want to, I am more than happy to help.

I thought of something else, is there any way YOU could take them shopping and show them things that they can eat and have them read the labels so they understand what they can and cannot eat. The list on this sites "site index" is a great list to help with label reading.

Good luck and it's great to see your concern! :)

Kassandra

Thanks for the reply.. I want to help them out as much as I can but am the older one and not one of they're friend, KWIM?? also they live in Ohio and I in Texas so I only see them a few times a year. I can email and help them out on the phone but know they are going to want to talk to others they're age. Thanks so much for your email I will pass it on!!

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:D Also, make sure your parents are together on them being gluten-free (even though I think you said they're divorced.) Your parents will need to make sure there is always food for them to eat such as granola bars, etc. It is definitely going to take a little, okay A LOT of adjustment, but this is the best diagnosis to me. The prescription is to change your diet!!!

I would also encourage both parents to get tested. I must assume you all got it from somebody's genes.

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I would also encourage both parents to get tested. I must assume you all got it from somebody's genes.

I would suggest to them that they frequent this website, and that they get in touch with their local celiac support chapter, if there is one in their area.

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I was diagnosed a little over a month before my 17th birthday. Post-daignosis I actually have the energy to do all those things my friends were doing that I couldn't keep up with.

I found it very liberating (after reading every book I could get my hands on and educating my family about what I could eat (good thing, too, since 2 others have just been diagnosed Celiac)). :)

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I would suggest to them that they frequent this website, and that they get in touch with their local celiac support chapter, if there is one in their area.

I second this suggestion.

I also think getting them in contact with other kids their age, either through this website or a local group, who are going through the same thing would be very helpful- for support, sharing info and coping strategies, etc. Check out the Teenagers section.

They need to know that they aren't alone, and that there are many kids out there living their lives succesfully with celiac.

I have also heard about Celiac summer camps, you might want to look into that for them.

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