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So I called the ped gi today since the ped wants to now about a follow visit. Since the biopsy was "normal" she doesn't have Celiac but is just sensitive and lactase deficient and they want us to seek out a nutrionist. Since the one in his office hasn't told us anything we didn't know, I really don't think one would be of much more help than I can find online. So to you guys I turn

Since we are gluten free/dairy free/soy free and have to watch cashews, here are my questions. I hope someone might be able to answer them. I have 3 kids 10, 7, 20 months and they are all doing the above diet.

How do I get the most calcium in a day? I'm thinking fortified calcium orange juice, almond milk but how much veggies and what kinds of veggies/fruit

do I need to worry much about protein? We eat meat with every dinner (mostly chicken/pork), lunch meat or hot dogs or chicken nuggetts with lunch and eggs with breakfast

And we are using grains like buckwheat, sorghum, brown rice flour, almond meal - are those a good source of b vitamins, and other things?

what would be the best vitamin to supplement with

Thanks

Stacie

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

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You get the most calcium out of green leafy vegetables. Not milk, not fortified juice, just dark green veggies.

It sounds like you certainly don't have to worry about protein, you are getting plenty.

Buckwheat is not a grain, but rather a seed. I don't have any idea what kinds of vitamins you get out of those flours. It might be a good idea to give your kids a good multivitamin (make sure it is gluten-free).


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Thank you! how much dark green leafy stuff? How many times a week do I need to work those in to dinners? And more importantly how can I sneak them in? The extent of our dark green leafy in the past amounted to the likes of iceberg lettuce. <_< I'm having to seriously revamp our veggie/fruit intake. Before it was easy to get the calcium as we measured it be the amount and size of cheese, milk, vanilla pudding. We had it worked out to an ounce of hard cheese, slice on sandwhiches, glass of milk, serving of vanilla pudding and some yogurt. Now, I'm having to scrap that and I really don't know what to replace it with. A piece of broccoli, serving of spinach, can I puree and use it as a coating on chicken nuggetts or something like that? My ped is going to really question how I'm getting calcium in the kids so I need a new system. i know the juice and almond milk they love so I can use that to help. What are the dark veggies and does any fruit qualify?

Stacie

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Stacie, the dairy industry with the help of the government has brainwashed the majority of the population into believing that you need dairy for calcium. Nothing could be further from the truth. Because of pasteurization, the calcium in milk is not usable by humans at all.

America has the highest consumption of dairy in the world, but also the highest rate of osteoporosis!

My husband's grandmother had a lifelong severe dairy intolerance and NEVER had any dairy at all. When she fell and broke her femur at the age of 98, they tested her for osteoporosis, and they were astonished that there wasn't even a hint of it! She walked again within six months.

I don't know how many green veggies you'd have to eat to get enough calcium. You might just want give the kids some chewable calcium/magnesium tablets (or liquid), I bet you can find some in the health food store (but be careful to make sure they are gluten-free).

In fact, most good multivitamins contain calcium and magnesium!

And just forget about what the ped thinks! Use your own good judgment. Most doctors, including pediatricians haven't got a clue about proper nutrition. Most average people have a better idea as to what you should eat.

As long as you feed your kids a healthy diet of meat, veggies and fruit, with the occasional treat (but not too much junk food), they'll be just fine.

I never had a pediatrician for my five kids, and my kids don't have a pediatrician for their kids, either. Their family doctors (a naturopathic doctor in my oldest daughter's case) and chiropractors are their doctors, for their kids as well, and everybody is healthy and doing well.

My five kids saw a doctor maybe once every few years, because they were so healthy they never needed any doctor. I do my own research, and think that my kids were healthier because no doctor was allowed to meddle with what I was doing.

Trust your own instincts, you don't need a doctor to tell you what to feed your kids.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Hi Ursa Major....

I have also heard this about dairy. I just never heard anybody so SURE of it as you. What does the pasteurization process do to the milk so that the calcium is unusable? What is wrong with the calcium in OJ and almond milk? And why do you recommend multis over those other things-- they are all "artificial" supplementation. Why are green leafy veggies better to provide calcium? There are always conflicts about this stuff and I never know who to believe. If you didn't eat many green leafy veggies (i only like spinach and kale-- and only have it once or twice a week)-- would you be getting enough calcium along with a multi?? and what about the fact that everybody argues you need vitamin D that is in milk to absorb the calcium....does this exist in green leafy veggies?

I have also heard that too much animal protein leaches calcium from bones.

Oh my goodness, lost and confused.....

Stacie, the dairy industry with the help of the government has brainwashed the majority of the population into believing that you need dairy for calcium. Nothing could be further from the truth. Because of pasteurization, the calcium in milk is not usable by humans at all.

America has the highest consumption of dairy in the world, but also the highest rate of osteoporosis!

My husband's grandmother had a lifelong severe dairy intolerance and NEVER had any dairy at all. When she fell and broke her femur at the age of 98, they tested her for osteoporosis, and they were astonished that there wasn't even a hint of it! She walked again within six months.

I don't know how many green veggies you'd have to eat to get enough calcium. You might just want give the kids some chewable calcium/magnesium tablets (or liquid), I bet you can find some in the health food store (but be careful to make sure they are gluten-free).

In fact, most good multivitamins contain calcium and magnesium!

And just forget about what the ped thinks! Use your own good judgment. Most doctors, including pediatricians haven't got a clue about proper nutrition. Most average people have a better idea as to what you should eat.

As long as you feed your kids a healthy diet of meat, veggies and fruit, with the occasional treat (but not too much junk food), they'll be just fine.

I never had a pediatrician for my five kids, and my kids don't have a pediatrician for their kids, either. Their family doctors (a naturopathic doctor in my oldest daughter's case) and chiropractors are their doctors, for their kids as well, and everybody is healthy and doing well.

My five kids saw a doctor maybe once every few years, because they were so healthy they never needed any doctor. I do my own research, and think that my kids were healthier because no doctor was allowed to meddle with what I was doing.

Trust your own instincts, you don't need a doctor to tell you what to feed your kids.

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You have gotten some good advice already.

One of the simplest things to do to know if you are getting balanced nutrition is to look at your plate. Is it colorful? If it is chances are it is pretty balanced. My Mom taught me that as a child and it was reinforced in nutrition classes that I have taken.

You can sneak veggies into a lot of stuff, meat and bean loafs, pureed and added to pasta sauce, soups, dips, even muffins. If kids help with the cooking they are more likely to eat what they fix. Have them help with the prep for quick veggie and meat sautes that you can put over rice noodles or rice. Even the smallest can snap the ends off beans or help rinse veggies or select them. Be aware also that some kids are what they call 'super tasters', these may have a true aversion for some veggies like broccoli or onions. Don't push them just give them a veggie they do like. We also use fruit as a veggie replacement at times. A bowl full of sliced strawberries, kiwi's, blueberry and raspberries with just a tiny sprinkle of sugar or honey will disappear fast and is loaded with good stuff.

Hemp milk might be worth trying also. It has more calcium than any of the other milks I have tried and also a lot of protein.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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ooops, double post :rolleyes:


Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11

Son: ADHD '06,

neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07

ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08

ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08

Gluten-free-Feb. '09

other food allergies

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I was given a chart on nutrients in gluten-free grains recently. So here's some trivia. I'll just list the calcium and magnesium unless there's another specific nutrient you're concerned about.

It is per cup (raw)(keep in mind these are the grains not the flours).

calcium magnesium

Amaranth 298mg 519mg

Buckwheat 31mg 393mg

Millet 16 mg 228mg

Oats 54 mg 276mg

Brown Rice 63mg 272mg

Quinoa 102mg 357mg

Sorghum 54mg n/a

Wild Rice 34mg 283mg

Durham Wheat(for comparison) 65mg 276mg

http://www.ars.usda.gov/Main/docs.htm?docid=15869


Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11

Son: ADHD '06,

neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07

ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08

ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08

Gluten-free-Feb. '09

other food allergies

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