Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

poodlethree

Help I Cant Find Anything Good To Eat!

Recommended Posts

Hello all,

I have just been told (after years of suffering) that I have Celiac Disease. I rushed out to the local bookstore and bought up 4 cookbooks. I then went to the local health food store and shelled out $75.00 for various types of flours, etc.

I went home and attempted to bake bread (also invested in a bread maker) I baked bread. I made cookies and several other things. Well, I guess my question is....Is there anything out there that even comes close to the bread I have eaten for years? It seems that everything I have made has a funny taste. Now, dont get me wrong. I do understand that I am having to adjust to a wheat free lifestyle......but is anything going to have any taste to me?

I am not tring to whine but being new to all of this....well it bites big time.

Does anyone have any suggestions for me? Will I just have to get used to doing without breads. Do you just get used to having a limited menu?

Boy, it seems Im in a mourning phase for how I used to eat.

If anyone can suggest any cookbooks or websites where I might find good ideas for making gluten free breads, cookies etc. or any thoughtful insites on how you got used to this new lifestlye....

I would be greatful for any ideas or insites.....Thanks, Kathy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Bread is very difficult to replace. I think I read an article that somewhere in Northern Europe somebody made a break-through in celiac bread :rolleyes:, but so far there isn't anything exactly like the old bread. The main problem, I think, is density.

For store-bought breads, I think the Ener-G and Kinnickinick breads are the best. I think I usually use Ener-G, but Kinnickinick is good, also. Unfortunately, breads are rather expensive. I think the main fault for both is that they aren't light enough--too dense.

I've heard that it's very difficult to make a good homemade bread that doesn't flop or anything. There are many posts under the baking, cooking tips, and recipes section, though, which would probably help you find a recipe and tips on how to make a successful loaf.

Good luck!

-celiac3270

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't make my own bread but I buy Kinnikinnick brand and they have some awesome bread and english muffins. My Mother and Brother (both Celiacs as well) by Whole Foods Bakery brand and enjoy it.

It does take awhile to get used to cooking and eating the glutenfree products because they do tatse and cook differently. . .but after a few months they arn't so bad!

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes...you also start to forget what the old version tasted like after awhile, which makes you all the more satisfied with the gluten-free version. I've been almost a year on this diet and lately I've been literally rechecking that the bagel I'm eating is gluten-free...and of course it is--it has it on the package--I'm just saying that it gets better. Especially since you find better and better replacements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"limited menu" is a relative term. I don't eat much in the way of breads these days, but I do have a wide variety in my diet (and I'm dairy-free as well):

smoothies, salads (vegetable/fruit/bean/green/exotic, etc), meats, veggies, stir-fries, soups, stews, mexican food, chinese food, italian food, indian food, thai food, vegetarian dishes, etc.

For baked goods, I find quick breads and muffins to be easy to make gluten-free.

If you're not used to cooking, it takes some time and experimenting to find out how to cook things you like. But like any other skill, it just takes practice. :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had great luck with Bette Hagman's "The Gluten Free Gourmet Bakes Bread". My girlfriend gave it to me for Xmas (she is so supportive of my gluten-free-ness!! It feels really great to have that kind fo support.) I used to only use Manna from Anna for my bread machine. I still like it, but I've been having a ball playing with the bread in Hagman's book. And, I do them in the oven, no bread machine. Her French Bread in unreal! Not light and fluffy, but still really tasty and a great texture. Toasted it tastes like a Thomases English Muffin!!!

Give it a shot!

Michelle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't bake a good gluten-free yeast bread to save my life! I can make quick breads, cakes, brownies, cookies (all different kinds) and other goodies, but not regualr yeast bread. I use Kinnikinnick breads. Their white sandwich bread, and the sunflower flax are what we use most often. Makes great sandwiches, french toast and toast. I also have in stock in my freezer as much raisin bread and Starlight grain free bread that I could get before they discontinued those two flavors last fall. Both we use only for toast. Their breads are very light compared to other gluten-free breads. The trick is to keep the bread frozen and then microwave for about 30 seconds to soften the bread. then use it for toast, sandwich, french toast, or whatever else you can think of. They also make great bagels, muffins and biscuits. As well as many other products. We also get their pizza crust. It is a bit on the sweet side, but has a good taste and is the most like real pizza than any I have been able to try. http://www.kinnikinnick.com/

I highly recommend them.

God bless,

Mariann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poodlethree,

There is a recipe in a post by "catfish" under the "Does Anyone Bake Their Own gluten-free Bread" topic of this forum. I made it this week and it tops all of the bread recipes and mixes (probably 20 or so) that I've tried over the past few years, as far as taste, texture, and "durability". It's not dry and crumbly at all. I added 2 tsp of dough enhancer, but that was my only major deviation. Try this one in the oven as rolls or a loaf; I think you'll be surprirsed. Today I wondered, for the first time, whether or not it was gluten-free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Everyone!

When I was first told I had Celiac Disease the Doctor gave me a print out of what NOT to eat. I have had a really hard time with this new way of eating. I knew what not to eat,however the trick was...finding out just what I could eat.

Everyone on this board is so nice and I want to let you know how much all the ideas mean to me. You all have helped more than you know. I really did not know what to buy. I sure did not want to waste anymore money on food I was taking a taste of and putting in the trash.....YUCK...everything I have tried to bake has been terrible.

Anyway...thanks again for all the great ideas. Im going shopping and hopefully I get the hang of this gluten-free way of cooking.

God Bless you all! I really think with having this kind of support I'll be just fine!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep...of course, make sure it looks like a credible site. The shipping is high, so you're best off with a nearby healthfood store, but with some sites they have a flat shipping rate so you can just order in bulk and the shipping doesn't seem as extreme.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found that for wheat bread, the closest thing is the Manna From Anna mix. It's AMAZING. For white bread, I make the Tapioca Bread in Bette Hagman's Living Well Without Wheat: The Gluten-Free Gourmet Revised Edition. AGain, amazing. Very much like "real" bread.

I order foods from, mainly, The Gluten-Free Trading Company bc they have such a HUGE selection and I've been very happy with their service. You can locate them at http://www.gluten-free.tc/

Best of luck! Bridget

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I order online from :

Kinnikinnick-for breads, pizza crust, donuts and muffins. Shipping is a flat rate of $10.00. I buy in bulk and stock my freezer, as well as share the order with a friend who has a child on the gluten-free diet. This cuts my shipping costs dramatically. You also earn g-points with each order that you can cash in for credit on your future orders. I earn about @500 points per $100 spent and each 1000 points is worth $5.00 credit. This last time I cashed in 2000 points and got free shipping. http://www.kinnikinnick.com/

Gluten Solutions-pretzels, Really Great Foods cake mix, individually wrapped cookies, and rice protein bars. I think the shipping is based on weight, but it isn't too high. I paid @$15.00 for 18 lbs. on my last shipment. If you order more than 15 items then you get $2.00 off your shipping. I just order in bulk, again to save on shipping. http://www.glutensolutions.com/

The Gluten Free Pantry-Dakota Lakes seasoning, and individual packets of Annie's dressings, ANDI bars, cookies, crackers. I pay the most on shipping here, so I only order when I am desperate. One order I paid $12 for 8 lbs. I don't know if the shipping is based on weight or not, but it always seems a little high to me. I trust them though and for items I can't find elsewhere...I don't really have a choice. http://www.gluten free.com/index.htm

Ener-G Foods-bulk flours and baking supplies. They are very reasonable on their shipping. I ordered more than 16lbs of various flours and starches and the shipping was @$9.00. http://www.ener-g.com/

These are the stores that I frequently buy from. I have also purchased from shopbydiet.com. I liked that they offer free shipping on orders over $79, but my order got delayed in their processing center and the gluten-free tortillas that I really wanted to try were moldy by the time I got them. I have hesitated buying from them again. I did like what they had to offer and I was very happy with the proce and variety of the gluten-free cereals. I think it was just a freak thing about the tortillas and they appologized profusely and refunded my credit card right away. I need more cereal and will probably check them out again. http://www.shopbydiet.com/

I also buy Vance's DariFree drink mix directly from the Vance's site. They offer the best price and shipping is not too bad. http://www.vancesfoods.com/

God bless,

Mariann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mariann provided you with some excellent links.

Also, try http://www.chebe.com. I love the pizza you can make using the bread mix (bread mix makes a better pizza than their "pizza crust", so try this one). Of course, there's no replacement, but Chebe's great. You can also make bread sticks, etc. using the mix--just not an actual loaf. PLUS, FREE SHIPPING! :D:lol: ...and if you like it, you can order it in bulk for discounted prices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as cookies, pancakes, waffles, etc. go, I swear by Pamela's baking mixes: she has both a regular baking mix and a chocolate one. When I made the brownie cookies from the chocolate mix, my friends didn't even realize it was gluten-free. Pamela's also has prepackaged cookies that are great. Her line has been my savior for my sweet tooth since being diagnosed. Good luck with the food and recipe search!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites