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glutenfreejenny

In College & Working Help!

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I debated on where to post this, I was going to put it in the teen/young adults, but I'm in my mid 20's and I thought I could get more advice from people who are done with college.

Anyway, I am currently working full time (no choice there) and trying to go to school full time (it's turned into part time because of the celiac disease). When I get sick it usually lasts about 7 days to fully recover. About 3 or 4 of those days are spent so tired it's really hard to get out of bed. I still continue to go to work because I can't lose my job, so school comes in second. I've told my academic advisor about my celiac disease, but haven't really explained it or anything. I've been missing a lot of classes lately. When I get glutenated sometimes while sick I'll catch something else like the flu. I work with kids so there's always something going around.

My question is about school. Is there anything I can do to make them more aware and help me out? My teachers all do not accept late work, it's a school policy. So if I miss a day all that work is gone. This is obviously a problem. I've been trying to get through college for the past 5 years. Any advice?

Thanks :)

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I debated on where to post this, I was going to put it in the teen/young adults, but I'm in my mid 20's and I thought I could get more advice from people who are done with college.

Anyway, I am currently working full time (no choice there) and trying to go to school full time (it's turned into part time because of the celiac disease). When I get sick it usually lasts about 7 days to fully recover. About 3 or 4 of those days are spent so tired it's really hard to get out of bed. I still continue to go to work because I can't lose my job, so school comes in second. I've told my academic advisor about my celiac disease, but haven't really explained it or anything. I've been missing a lot of classes lately. When I get glutenated sometimes while sick I'll catch something else like the flu. I work with kids so there's always something going around.

My question is about school. Is there anything I can do to make them more aware and help me out? My teachers all do not accept late work, it's a school policy. So if I miss a day all that work is gone. This is obviously a problem. I've been trying to get through college for the past 5 years. Any advice?

Thanks :)

Not to sound like the doctor on "Hee-Haw," but if you're only getting sick when you accidentally eat gluten, don't do that. We can help a lot with suggestions for quick meals, fast food (maybe not "a lot" under that category, but some), frozen foods, meal planning, etc. Obviously, you're pressed for time, but this is your health you're talking about. Even apart from being able to meet school and work responsibilities, you have to learn how to live gluten-free, and for the rest of your life.

You should certainly make your employers and teachers aware of the situation, and try to get them to work with you as much as possible. I don't know what kind of school refuses as policy to accept late work; obviously you'll have to find out if there's any wiggle room in the policy at all. If you're asking whether the ADA applies to celiac disease, no, it probably doesn't. But people are willing to make reasonable accommodations. You'll just have to explain as clearly as you can the situation, and as I say, try harder to avoid gluten accidents.

Also, there's no law that says you have to finish school in any set span of time. If you have no choice about working full time and are having too much difficulty keeping up with school, let school go until you have a better handle on the gluten-free diet. When you go back, your performance will likely be dramatically better.

Sorry I can't offer any more helpful suggestions. Good luck.

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You could try on-line classes since you'd be submitting via the internet. Are you eating gluten-free? I found working and going to college at the same time to be doable as long as I followed my diet. So, it can be done! Just make sure you are eating right, even if it means only fresh fruit, veggies, and meat. It may be boring but you will not get sick. Good luck!

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Is it possible for you to take a term off from school and get a solid health and good habit foundation under you? There is so much pressure to get into a good school, get good grades, graduate as soon as possible and make lots and lots of money... In my experience, no one has ever asked me at a job interview what my grades were and how long it took me to get through school (B average & over 8 years). It sounds like you are in a place where you are questioning whether or not to push yourself... my personal experience has shown me time and time again, that if I push myself, I end up paying for it more than if I had just backed off a bit, i.e. I push through one week and am down for two months instead of taking the 2 days it would have taken to get my strength back. This is just my personal experience and yours may be completely different and I might have misunderstood your post... I guess my theme is that it is totally fine, and actually wise, to take time out and care for your health.

Please go back and talk with the folks at school who can help you. Perhaps you can bring a note from your doctor. Take the time before you meet with them to clearly decide what you want. Ask what they have done in other cases of chronic illness. You might try sending an email, too... something like "I have a chronic illness that at times makes it incredibly difficult for me to meet my obligations as a student. What accommodations or solutions we can find to this problem so that I can stay on track with obtaining my degree?" Be direct and try not to whine (I'm terrible with that). Unfortunately some of your very healthy student peers have tried to manipulate their professors with lame excuses and the professors don't want to hear anything now, whether legit or not. If you approach them in a professional, adult manner, you should have better success. Unfortunately, what you are experiencing is a life lesson from a class you didn't enroll in, other than the class of life. and it isn't a very fun class, sorry kiddo! Do not accept anything other than your needs being met. You give this school money, you buy their product and if you aren't getting what you pay for, you might want to consider going to another school.

Hang in there and be gentle with your precious self!

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MST's suggestion about online classes is a good one, IMO. I am finishing up my last class online and will be receiving my BA in a couple of weeks. If it is an option for you, it's great because even though you still have due dates, you can do assignments day or night, whenever you can. Make sure they're accredited by the Dept. of Education. In fact, a lot of "brick and mortar" colleges/universities are offering online programs.

Mrs. Doyle and The Fluffy Assassin are also correct, you must take care of your health first and foremost. If you don't have your health, you have nothing. If you tell us what area of the country you're in, we (people on this forum) might be able to tell you about gluten-free restaurants and products in your area. Good luck and I hope everything works out for you.

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My oldest daughter is your age, and we both recently found out we have Celiac disease. She just started a promising new job, wants to further her education and make it a career, and is dealing with the same problems you are. We're still going through a lot of accidental "glutenings" just like you because it's a dramatic lifestyle change and we're still learning every day.

I think it's harder for her because she is tempted to cheat every day -- especially because she's so busy. I've only given into temptation once since going gluten-free in June, and I paid dearly. It really seems like my reactions are much worse than before I went gluten-free (or maybe I was used to it after so many years?). But the good days are sure a nice change!

A lot of pressure is often put on young adults to burn the candle at both ends because they're "young and strong," but the bottom line is you have a serious disease that you're learning to live with, while simultaneously trying to make a good future for yourself.

I REALLY admire your drive to get an education and your self-sufficiency, but like I keep stressing to my daughter: your present and future health are most important. You can't do your best at anything without it.

Obviously everyone here is behind you 100%!

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I debated on where to post this, I was going to put it in the teen/young adults, but I'm in my mid 20's and I thought I could get more advice from people who are done with college.

Anyway, I am currently working full time (no choice there) and trying to go to school full time (it's turned into part time because of the celiac disease). When I get sick it usually lasts about 7 days to fully recover. About 3 or 4 of those days are spent so tired it's really hard to get out of bed. I still continue to go to work because I can't lose my job, so school comes in second. I've told my academic advisor about my celiac disease, but haven't really explained it or anything. I've been missing a lot of classes lately. When I get glutenated sometimes while sick I'll catch something else like the flu. I work with kids so there's always something going around.

My question is about school. Is there anything I can do to make them more aware and help me out? My teachers all do not accept late work, it's a school policy. So if I miss a day all that work is gone. This is obviously a problem. I've been trying to get through college for the past 5 years. Any advice?

Thanks :)

Its very tough,been there done that! Unawareness is hurting us,,alot!celiac disease for 6 years.Chuck :huh:

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Not much to add other than that Celiac is covered under the ADA. You should go to the ADA office at school and see what help they can provide. Also you may be getting CC'd badly working with the little ones. Their snacks and even some of the stuff they may use for play could be an issue.

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