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I went into see my GI regarding my issues and he gave me the bloodwork for Celiacs...but before he did, he asked me what my ancestory was?? What the heck does that have to do with anything, I thought...than he said it common in the Irish community. Since I wasn't Irish, I really thought he wasn't going to give me the bloodwork, but he did.

Has anyone ever heard of this?

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I went into see my GI regarding my issues and he gave me the bloodwork for Celiacs...but before he did, he asked me what my ancestory was?? What the heck does that have to do with anything, I thought...than he said it common in the Irish community. Since I wasn't Irish, I really thought he wasn't going to give me the bloodwork, but he did.

Has anyone ever heard of this?

He was probably just curious. This shows that he may be keeping up with current info on eliacs. It seems to be more common in Irish descent but is not exclusive to the Irish.. I actually read a study in a medical journal (can't remember where) about a researcher looking at ethnic origin.

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my son's GI doc commented on our very Italian last name. then i told him my husband is 1/4 Irish, 1/4 Polish and 1/2 Italian. i guess celiac disease is very common in Italians. we don't know if any of his family has celiac disease but there's gluten intolerances in my family. it's like a double whammy on my kids.

sounds like your doctor is on top of his game.

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One of the articles on the website for Pacific Health Center in Oregon says that celiac disease is much more common in N. and central Europe and N. India than in the States. As an example the article specifically cites Ireland, claiming that celiac disease is about 8 times more common there than in the States.

On the other hand, in my research the other day I came across an article from Dr. Mark Hyman that claimed that the wheat grown in the States is much, much higher in gluten content than the wheat grown in Europe; this is due to the fact that people here are so in love with their Wonder Bread-type breads.

So....who knows for sure? :blink:

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Ireland is supposed to have the highest amount of diagnosed Celiacs.

Italy screens all children before they enter school.

It seems to be so common in the northern European population, you can order a gluten free Big Mac from the McDonald's in Helsinki, Finland.

There are also known genetic links to Celiac and gluten sensitivity.

It leads back to the "caveman diet" and the ethnic peoples who adapted to farming food last theory. The fact remains that humans started ingesting foods that needed to be cooked to remove/lower toxicity levels.

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When I was diagnosed, my doc told me it was more common in those of Irish ancestry. I told him my mom was "right off the boat" ... she was born in Belfast. I'm the only one in my family and in my extended family. In my own research, I found it can be more common in Jews... so my kids have a double whammy... Scots/Irish mom and Jewish father.

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I just learned the other day , the only dog that can get true Celiac Disease are Irish Setters. I thought this was very funny.

:lol: :lol:

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I just learned the other day , the only dog that can get true Celiac Disease are Irish Setters. I thought this was very funny.

In regards to the Irish Setter as the only dog getting celiac, I don't know about that. My Scottish Terrier has been doing great gluten free...So great, that the English Bulldog she sees down the street wants the same diet now!! :wacko:

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:lol: :lol: :lol: Oh boy, now I think I've heard it all! :rolleyes::lol:

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Guest doradomiel

I happen to know an African-American lady who is diagnosed with celiac. But then again with America being the melting pot that it is, especially with so many half European/half African babies that were being born in the early 1800's (for reasons no one dares to acknowledge)- it seems to me that anybody could carry the celiac gene...

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In regards to the Irish Setter as the only dog getting celiac, I don't know about that. My Scottish Terrier has been doing great gluten free...So great, that the English Bulldog she sees down the street wants the same diet now!! :wacko:

"Dogs with celiac disease cannot tolerate gluten, a protein present in wheat, barley and rye. Eating those grains causes an abnormal immune response that attacks the small intestine. Irish Setters are the only breed known have to true celiac disease, but many dogs are sensitive to glutenous grains. Untreated celiac disease can lead to malnutrition and damage to the digestive tract"

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