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irish daveyboy

Barley Interactions With Drugs

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In general, prescription drugs should be taken one hour before or two hours after barley because barley may reduce the effectiveness of many drugs, vitamins and minerals.

One component of barley may increase the side effects associated with some drugs, including over-the-counter cold treatments containing pseudoephedrine (Sudafed).

Barley may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised if you are taking drugs that may also lower blood sugar levels.

Patients taking oral drugs for diabetes or using insulin should be monitored closely by a health care professional while using barley.

Dosing adjustments may be necessary.

Barley may increase the effects of cholesterol-lowering drugs.

Heart and blood pressure drugs and drugs used to treat parasites may interact with barley.

Wondering does this also apply to barley malt in breakfast cereals ??

http://tinyurl.com/22svjmb

Anyone know anything or heard about this before ??

Best Regards,

David


Chronically Ill and lost 56lbs in 3 Months Prior to Diagnosis.

Diagnosed in Nov 2005 after Biopsy and Blood Tests

Cannot tolerate Codex Wheat Starch.

Self Taught Baker.

Bake everything from scratch using naturally gluten-free ingredients.

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Well, since we can't have barley malt it's sort of a non-issue. I would be surprised if a tiny bit would make a big difference though. They're probably talking about eating it by the cup, as a normal grain.

Some high-fiber grains can lower blood sugar. Oats do it, as does rye.

Looking at the references, I'm not entirely sure why the guys at Harvard even let that stuff about meds through. There is nothing in the reference list about a Sudafed interaction.

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Don't have to worry about that since we should not eat barley in any form.

In the UK barley Malt is used to flavour Breakfast cereals and even some own brand using Barley malt are in the gluten-free Food bible as being ok.

I just copied and pasted it from the UK message forum.

So I presume the malt in breakfast cereals in the USA is rice malt ?

Best Regards,

David


Chronically Ill and lost 56lbs in 3 Months Prior to Diagnosis.

Diagnosed in Nov 2005 after Biopsy and Blood Tests

Cannot tolerate Codex Wheat Starch.

Self Taught Baker.

Bake everything from scratch using naturally gluten-free ingredients.

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In the UK barley Malt is used to flavour Breakfast cereals and even some own brand using Barley malt are in the gluten-free Food bible as being ok.

I just copied and pasted it from the UK message forum.

So I presume the malt in breakfast cereals in the USA is rice malt ?

Best Regards,

David

No, unless it says rice (which the gluten-free ones say). We have cereals like Rice Krispies that for some reason have barley malt.


 

 

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You might want to have a look at this if you are eating barley malt. Tricia Thompson, who is one of the best celiac dietitians around, says eating barley malt not a good idea, despite whatever your book might say. The testing that has been done has determined that cereals with barley malt in them are not necessarily safe for celiacs.

http://www.diet.com/dietblogs/read_blog.php?title=Can+Barley+Malt+Extract+Really+Be+Gluten-Free%3F&blid=15528

And no, rice malt is not commonly used in the US. There are very few mainstream gluten-free cereals, partly because of barley malt that is commonly added to rice cereals. Gluten free Chex switched their formulation from malt to molasses.

As a general rule, it is unwise to eat anything derived from wheat, barley, or rye unless it has been distilled. Even distillation is not enough for some super-sensitive celiacs who react to grain vinegars and alcohols.

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