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Simona19

All Family With Celiac Disease.

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I just want to share something. I had my husband tested for the celiac disease. Today I called our doctor for the results. Something came up because doctor want to see my husband. I asked nurs what was wrong, but she didn't want to tell me. I know that something is positive. He had only celiac panel written on the prescription. It looks like my whole family will have the celiac disease. It will be funn.

My son refuses the upper endoscopy and my husband is in shock from the results. He don't want to eat gluten free food at all. He thinks that it's some mistake. So far only I'm gluten free. I also have real allergy to milk (casein), nuts and fructose intolerance. I also have allergy to kiwi, orange flavor, mint + latex. After years of avoiding bananas because I had hives from them, I'm able after 7 months on gluten free diet eat them again. He see me avoiding a lot of food and I thing that is his problem.

I don'n know how I will manage all this. My family will have a funn in the near future.

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I want to let you know that you are not alone. I discovered my latex allergy and got DX just last October after progressively worsening reactions. DS is latex allergic as well. Even with all that I've been through and even with all my restrictions, latex allergy opened my eyes to a whole new world that I never imagined. I discovered about 20 food allergies the year before(including casein and soy) and the year before that I discovered diabetes, two years before that I discovered my gluten issues. Last week I had my Type 2 diabetes DX changed to a type 1. All managed by diet alone so far. That's only me. My kiddo has a couple of food allergies including gluten and ADHD DX. On one level our daily meals are a nightmare, on another I DO manage. It requires a major adjustment and change but in the end it's all worth it. My DH and I have recently learned where we can buy produce that is not wrapped in rubber bands for example. Keep it simple, lots of old fashioned from scratch cooking like great grandma did. Pick and choose your battles. We have indoor allergies so keeping house clean makes a big difference but I just can't do it all and have to let some things go and am still learning to live one step at a time, one day at a time and decide what really needs to be done and let other things go. Enlist the help of all family members. I try and teach kiddo cooking skills. It helps now as well as prepares him for the future. If you can find a way to make a few things that are familiar and tasty for your DH that will help. I know it can be a sacrifice. I sacrifice and make things for my kiddo that are gluten-free that I can't eat so that he will not feel deprived and other times make things that we all can eat. It's a challenge. I do my best to make Ds feel as normal and comfortable as realistically possible.

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I want to let you know that you are not alone. I discovered my latex allergy and got DX just last October after progressively worsening reactions. DS is latex allergic as well. Even with all that I've been through and even with all my restrictions, latex allergy opened my eyes to a whole new world that I never imagined. I discovered about 20 food allergies the year before(including casein and soy) and the year before that I discovered diabetes, two years before that I discovered my gluten issues. Last week I had my Type 2 diabetes DX changed to a type 1. All managed by diet alone so far. That's only me. My kiddo has a couple of food allergies including gluten and ADHD DX. On one level our daily meals are a nightmare, on another I DO manage. It requires a major adjustment and change but in the end it's all worth it. My DH and I have recently learned where we can buy produce that is not wrapped in rubber bands for example. Keep it simple, lots of old fashioned from scratch cooking like great grandma did. Pick and choose your battles. We have indoor allergies so keeping house clean makes a big difference but I just can't do it all and have to let some things go and am still learning to live one step at a time, one day at a time and decide what really needs to be done and let other things go. Enlist the help of all family members. I try and teach kiddo cooking skills. It helps now as well as prepares him for the future. If you can find a way to make a few things that are familiar and tasty for your DH that will help. I know it can be a sacrifice. I sacrifice and make things for my kiddo that are gluten-free that I can't eat so that he will not feel deprived and other times make things that we all can eat. It's a challenge. I do my best to make Ds feel as normal and comfortable as realistically possible.

Thank you for your reply. It helps to know that I'm not alone. I told my son about his father's results, and I saw that he felt better because he wasn't alone in this. I always had many allergies (I forgot honey) and was forced to avoid food. The rest of my family had none. It is shock for them.

I also have indoors allergies from 16 years of age and astma with many triggers (smoke, parfumes, cold air, exercise and more). I need to have with me the EPI- injections and albuterol- the emergency spray for asthma everywhere I go. After the casein allergy I was forced to weare a medical bracelet with all my allergies listed.

I'm use to be sick and on the restrictions, but them? It will be hard, but I hope manageable.

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In the long run it probably should make things a big easier for you because you will be able to cook things for everyone to eat a lot of the time. Also, they will have more respect and understanding for your needs :) Sure, it will be hard at first and be prepared for the grieving process and the withdrawal, but once that is over it should be smoother sailing.

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It is not unusual at all for all in the family to be celiac. Hold off on gluten free breads and other replacements for a bit. Often after people have been gluten free for a while they find the replacements a bit more tasty. Go with whole naturally gluten free foods, stews can be thickened by cutting a potato or two really small and letting it cook down to thicken. Rice is gluten free and there is a lot you can do with that. Thai Kitchen makes rice noodles that are not real pricey and since they are not 'specialty gluten free' items your family may be less likely to turn their nose up at them. I use the angel hair a lot and there is a thicker linguine type also. Go through your cabinets and get rid of all gluten foods. Donate them to a food bank so you can take a tax write off. It might be easier to do this when your family isn't around as it can be depressing to watch all that 'money' run out the door. If you live near a Wegmans they make shopping easier as they label all gluten-free food with a circle G.

In the long run it can be hard to make the changes but the family will be so much healthier and happier in the long run.

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Thank you for your reply. It helps to know that I'm not alone. I told my son about his father's results, and I saw that he felt better because he wasn't alone in this. I always had many allergies (I forgot honey) and was forced to avoid food. The rest of my family had none. It is shock for them.

I also have indoors allergies from 16 years of age and astma with many triggers (smoke, parfumes, cold air, exercise and more). I need to have with me the EPI- injections and albuterol- the emergency spray for asthma everywhere I go. After the casein allergy I was forced to weare a medical bracelet with all my allergies listed.

I'm use to be sick and on the restrictions, but them? It will be hard, but I hope manageable.

Where there's a will, there's a way and you'll find some sort of new normal in your home.

I understand. I was sick so long and my restrictions have each made me feel that much better but it's still hard for DS sometimes because his restrictions don't make him feel all that bad. It's a subtle cumulative effect so he has a hard time feeling like he needs to be free of these things. Making naturally gluten-free or unnoticeably gluten-free things to share at church tea time and keeping busy with life itself help take the focus off the dietary issues.

I know that it has helped me that DS and I have gone through this whole journey with the food allergies together. With our eliminations and challenges(re-introductions) we've thought of it a bit like Iron Chef- It's been battle almond! or battle corn!

Try and find the fun/adventure in it when you can. I was not up to learning how to bake gluten-free cookies that only 1 of us would eat last year at Xmas so I got out grandma's old retro Jello cookbook and we picked out a fanciful creation, rainbow jello, and made it. DS loved the colorful dessert and said it was SO worth all the time it took to let each of the many layers set before adding the next. He loved that more than any cookies we could have made!

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