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So, I'm in college, and I'm looking for some tips on how to basically just deal with it.

I've had symptoms for years, but finally went and got checked out, and lo and behold, Celiac's it was.

Anyone have any support/tips for how to do it?

My two main staples have been taken away. I've found some decent gluten-free bread, but how do you

survive the high prices of gluten-free products?

Starving college student has been taken to a whole new level for me.

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Katie -- lots of cheap recipes out there. I'm single, and survive on $50/grocery trip/week, and could do it on 30 if I had to. Here's how:

Tuna -- easy-peasy. Over salad, with mayo, etc.

Corn tortilla -- great for sandwiches

Shop bulk with roommate or friend, and you can both eat healthy and cheap!

Progresso soup -- cheap, gluten free (check the label, though)

Buy value paks of chicken breasts and freeze. Many cheap, easy meals

Thai soup bowls can be cheap and gluten free, just check the label

I lived on pasta and flavored diced tomatoes my first time around in college. If you are just prepping for yourself, you can probably make a very cheap meal that way, even with the increased cost of gluten free pasta.

Gorilla munch cereal

The list goes on.

Think in terms of regular food -- it's not that expensive and easy to make. You just have to be prepared to put out a bit more effort than prepackaged food. I swear -- it can be done. Also, talk to your school. I'm a grad student, and we have three other students/faculty in my seasonal residencies (it's a distance program) that have celiac's or wheat allergies, in addition to the student population at large. So the chef is able and prepared to take care of my needs. Just make sure to really check ingredients on everything.

Coupon shop, and many stores now do special deals. Wegman's has free foods for members every week, and most times they are foods I can eat. Figure out your staple, go-to foods, and then build around them. I promise, it's not as hard as it first seems. One of my favorite cookbooks is the "Biggest Loser" cookbook, as the recipes are easy, and often already gluten free or easy to convert. Also, Hungry Girl often has easy recipes -- just convert them for your use. And they are frequently for one or two servings.

I make a lot of sautees for over salad or tortillas, or over chicken breasts. I eat burgers without a bun. Utilize a slow cooker. Traditional meals won't require you to do much to make them gluten free, and left overs are your best friend.

I hope some of these ideas help. I know how hard it is when you are on a limited budget. I just recently had to shrink my budget considerably, and I'm amazed by how much I was spending before, when I can get away on a LOT less. So hang in there. And don't be afraid to ask for accommodation at your cafeteria. They may already be doing it, and you have a diagnosis -- that can be a golden ticket. And you aren't being a pain -- they do it for other people who have food issues or sensitivities.

Most foods you "should" ;) be eating are already gluten free. Just cut back on the junk food and you'll be fine. And heck, you can still have ice cream and potato chips...which are another food group, dangit.

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I am lucky enough to have an organic food coop by my apartment. I know its expensive, but in the end I feel so much healthier for eating food I nuy there that the cost difference is worth it in good health! You may have to get used to cooking, but it can be really fun! I find it therapeutic, like my little days end meditation to cook a meal with tons of fresh veggies that I can eat for days! :)

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Katie -- lots of cheap recipes out there. I'm single, and survive on $50/grocery trip/week, and could do it on 30 if I had to. Here's how:

Tuna -- easy-peasy. Over salad, with mayo, etc.

Corn tortilla -- great for sandwiches

Shop bulk with roommate or friend, and you can both eat healthy and cheap!

Progresso soup -- cheap, gluten free (check the label, though)

Buy value paks of chicken breasts and freeze. Many cheap, easy meals

Thai soup bowls can be cheap and gluten free, just check the label

I lived on pasta and flavored diced tomatoes my first time around in college. If you are just prepping for yourself, you can probably make a very cheap meal that way, even with the increased cost of gluten free pasta.

Gorilla munch cereal

The list goes on.

Think in terms of regular food -- it's not that expensive and easy to make. You just have to be prepared to put out a bit more effort than prepackaged food. I swear -- it can be done. Also, talk to your school. I'm a grad student, and we have three other students/faculty in my seasonal residencies (it's a distance program) that have celiac's or wheat allergies, in addition to the student population at large. So the chef is able and prepared to take care of my needs. Just make sure to really check ingredients on everything.

Coupon shop, and many stores now do special deals. Wegman's has free foods for members every week, and most times they are foods I can eat. Figure out your staple, go-to foods, and then build around them. I promise, it's not as hard as it first seems. One of my favorite cookbooks is the "Biggest Loser" cookbook, as the recipes are easy, and often already gluten free or easy to convert. Also, Hungry Girl often has easy recipes -- just convert them for your use. And they are frequently for one or two servings.

I make a lot of sautees for over salad or tortillas, or over chicken breasts. I eat burgers without a bun. Utilize a slow cooker. Traditional meals won't require you to do much to make them gluten free, and left overs are your best friend.

I hope some of these ideas help. I know how hard it is when you are on a limited budget. I just recently had to shrink my budget considerably, and I'm amazed by how much I was spending before, when I can get away on a LOT less. So hang in there. And don't be afraid to ask for accommodation at your cafeteria. They may already be doing it, and you have a diagnosis -- that can be a golden ticket. And you aren't being a pain -- they do it for other people who have food issues or sensitivities.

Most foods you "should" ;) be eating are already gluten free. Just cut back on the junk food and you'll be fine. And heck, you can still have ice cream and potato chips...which are another food group, dangit.

Thank you so much for your input! I will definitely look out Hungry Girl, and the "Biggest Loser" cookbook. I just needed a little direction, and you absolutely were above and beyond. Thank you!

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I am lucky enough to have an organic food coop by my apartment. I know its expensive, but in the end I feel so much healthier for eating food I nuy there that the cost difference is worth it in good health! You may have to get used to cooking, but it can be really fun! I find it therapeutic, like my little days end meditation to cook a meal with tons of fresh veggies that I can eat for days! :)

Thank you! I'm getting used to cooking, and it is definitely becoming therapeutic for me :) I'm loving all the veggies. Thanks!

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