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MommaNerd

Three Quick Questions....

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First quick question, does Celiac Disease and Lactose Intolerance go hand in hand? A lot of what I have read states that if you removed wheat, rye, barley from your diet, you should also remove lactose. Any reasons for this?

Also, since I am expecting the blood tests to come back negative for Logan, should I also request a biopsy for him? Even if they come back positive, should I request a biopsy for him (remember he is only 18 months old)?

What is the actual benefit of having a formal medical diagnosis for Celiac Disease?

Thanks everyone!!

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First quick question, does Celiac Disease and Lactose Intolerance go hand in hand? A lot of what I have read states that if you removed wheat, rye, barley from your diet, you should also remove lactose. Any reasons for this?

Also, since I am expecting the blood tests to come back negative for Logan, should I also request a biopsy for him? Even if they come back positive, should I request a biopsy for him (remember he is only 18 months old)?

What is the actual benefit of having a formal medical diagnosis for Celiac Disease?

Thanks everyone!!

I can answer question number 1. :)

Lactase, which is the enzyme that breaks down the sugar lactose, is produced in the tip of the villi.

When the villi get blunted in celiac disease, sometimes the ability to digest lactose is decreased and you can become lactose intolerant. This secondary intolerance may well be temporary but will cause bloating, stomach cramps, diarrhea, etc. After going gluten-free, the villi will heal and most people are able to tolerate dairy foods again. It takes several months--my doctor suggested 6 months before trying it.

I do not know the circumstances surrounding your little one, so I hesitate to say what you should do. Maybe someone who knows Logan's story can chime in on this? I imagine you are reluctant to put him through a biopsy.

As for a "formal" diagnosis...many will never have one because of the many false negatives with the tests that are available for a firm diagnosis. The positive response to a gluten-free diet is what many rely on for their "diagnosis". There are also genetic tests (non-invasive) available which indicate whether someone may be genetically pre-disposed to developing celiac disease.

Hope this helps....and Best wishes!

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Testing in a toddler (in fact all children under five) is not highly accurate, whether blood or biopsy. If his blood test is positive his doctor may recommend the biopsy, but remember, it is your choice whether he is subjected to this procedure or not. Usually a doctor will give a celiac diagnosis based on a positive blood test and positive response to the diet alone. The only reason for needing a celiac diagnosis is that it makes it easier to get cooperation from his schools, once he starts school, in keeping him gluten free. They generally require something written from a doctor, although they are getting less particular now that there are more diagnosed celiac children around.

Removing lactose is pretty easy because there are lots of other milks around; even apart from soy (which I personally would not recommend) and rice milks (not Rice Dream though), there are also almond and hemp milks which are both delicious, and coconut and hemp ice cream too!

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The actual benefit of a formal diagnosis...

In Europe, this can get you forms of help with finding gluten free groceries. Also, if your child were to become sick, that diagnosis is already ruled out, so it must be something else.

In the US, this can help if your child is going to school and needs an excuse from An Authority Figure on why your school should not be accidentally glutening him or her. Schools nowadays have stranger and stranger rules on what can and can not be brought in and kept to one's self, or shared. And schools are just loaded at times with commercially made bakery cupcakes for special occasions, but some times they'll whig out if the kid brings a non approved personal snack.

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I agree with you mushroom!! I am not a huge fan of giving my boys soy, so I am going to have to search for an alternative to that! I don't even know about lataid milk or not. For right now, I think I will stick with almond milk until I find something that I know won't make him sick!

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