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heatherm4

Traveling To Dordogne Region In France

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I'm traveling to the Dordogne region of France later this month and have been stressing about food issues. In addition to celiac, I have many other intolerances--dairy, nuts, corn. I'm traveling with my mother-in-law, sisters-in-law, and the MIL's BFF. They aren't that understanding about my dietary issues, despite (or maybe because of) the fact that my FIL is a retired internist.

From searches on this forum, I've gathered that France is not the easiest place to travel with celiacs and a part of me wishes I weren't going, even though traveling to France again is a dream. (I studied there twice in college, pre-diagnosis.) Has anyone been to this area? I'd appreciate any advice. I believe Le Bugue is the nearest town to where we are staying.

merci.

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I have to wonder - why would you want to travel with these people who don't really care about your health or if you feel well? If they weren't relatives, I bet you wouldn't do more than talk on Facebook.

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Are you going self-catering or to hotels? I love the South of France and I'm going there for three weeks late summer. I'm doing two weeks self-catering and four nights in hotels travelling to and from Dunkirk ferry terminal in the North. This will be my first time there since being diagnosed. I'm making up a laminated card in French explaining what I can and can't eat, cross-contamination etc. Getting it from an app on my daughters iphone. The quality of fresh fruit, vegs, meat, poultry and fish in even the cheapest of French supermarkets is excellent. I'm taking packets of gluten free bread mix with me as my way of coping with not having their wonderful fresh bread and croissants straight from the boulangerie every morning.

If staying in hotels, have you already booked? Coeliac uk magazine has an advert for a chateau in Dordogne which does gourmet gluten free dining. Their website is www.chateaudevillars.co.uk.

You could also try googling for the French coeliac organisation for information.

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I have to wonder - why would you want to travel with these people who don't really care about your health or if you feel well? If they weren't relatives, I bet you wouldn't do more than talk on Facebook.

They're family. They do care. They're just skeptical about the role of food in health and ignorant about the ingredients in food--like most people and medical professionals. Not going isn't an option.

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I believe if there's a will there's a way! So cliche but true. :lol: I refuse to allow celiac disease prevent me from doing something I love.

Although I have not been to France since diagnosed with celiac disease I just returned back to Canada from Croatia which isn't exactly known for its knowledge of the disease. On their celiac website I read that there are only 4,000 people in the country diagnosed with it - plus much of their gluten-free is subsidized. Knowing all that in advance, I went prepared, taking lots of snacks along. But the restaurants were more knowledgable than I expected so that may be the case with you. If you manage to find places grill fresh fish, veg or meat that is a good option (of course avoiding CC issues). As mentioned the fresh markets are a dream!

The celiac restaurant cards you can print (on this site) are of great help. They explain celiac disease and what you must avoid. However, they are lacking in a bit of detail so I am going to do up my own next time. As you have further allergies you could add that info, too.

I just re-read what Navigator said and I'm afraid I've been repetitive here.

Anyway, do your homework in advance, relax and enjoy! It truly can be done.

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I agree with love2travel. It may take a bit of effort on your part but I'm sure that you'll love France. Try to get out of the tourist area and go to what we like to call 'real France' in the rural areas. It takes a bit more effort as here the people generally don't speak English but respond well to your efforts to speak schoolchild french and mime out what you want to say!! As long as you make an effort they are friendly and welcoming. To be honest the worst thing you can do is to start a conversation with 'parlez vous anglais'. If you start with pardonez, je ne parlez francais and then speak isolated french words with gestures, I find that you get a very good response.

As love2travel said, prepare as best as you can and take what you can with you. I would still recommend googling and finding out what products are available for you in France. It may be a pleasant surprise.

I would be really interested in hearing how your trip went. Enjoy! I completely understand your issues with in-laws. I love my in-laws dearly but they don't always get it. I know that it's not about their level of caring for me - they're in their 70s and just haven't come across it before and have that' give yourself a shake and get on with it' attitude but that comes from growing up in tougher times.

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