Jump to content
  • Sign Up
0
TexasJenn

Positive Ttg Iga And Ema

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I have been seeing a new doctor for various symptoms (the big ones being chronic fatigue and pain) after my previous doctor said I was depressed, and did no exam or testing. She ran a Celiac Panel at my request because my mom has Celiac, and I just wanted to be able to for rule it out. I was in no way even concerned about it. She called with the results and said I did in fact have Celiac. She said I tested positive for the tTG-IGA and EMA tests. I thought a biopsy was required to confirm diagnosis? I'm just shocked with the results, and I guess in denial. I mean, I feel pretty crummy, but not as sick as I would expect to be with Celiac. I'd like some opinions of others who have been there, done that!

BTW, she also diagnosed me with mild hypothyroidism, some severe vitamin deficiencies, and is testing me for adrenal fatigue.

Thanks!

Jenn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With those positives, especially the EMA in my book, I would say you have it. Also, the hypothyroidism and vitamin deficiencies go along with celiac routinely and I wouldn't be surprised by adrenal fatigue. And given that it is a genetically based inheritance disease - well, I would say you should eat gluten free regardless of what any biopsy may or may not say. Not everyone has dramatic GI symptoms - your chronic fatigue and pain are just as common. I know, it's hard to accept, but it is what it is. You could insist upon a biopsy if you really wanted it, and it is entirely up to you if you want this confirmation, but more and more doctors are realizing that you can have celiac disease and have a negative biopsy - about a 20% false negative rate.

Read around here a little and you will find people crying because they can't get a positive blood test..... :D

So I would say, "Welcome to the celiac community, Texas-Jenn" and here's to health.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Mushroom. I guess I'm still just getting used to the idea. I was ok until I really started looking into all of the things that contain gluten, and what really gets me is how careful you have to be because of cross contamination. As a mom of four, we are constantly on the go, and with my husband's crazy work schedule (and my lack of enthusiasm in the kitchen), we eat out a ton. A diet change is doable, but the lifestyle change that will be required is overwhelming. My mom adjusted really well when she was diagnosed four years ago, and I think that gives me a false sense of ease about it. She refrains from ingesting gluten in obvious ways, but doesn't worry too much about cross contamination and hidden gluten, so she makes it look so easy! She, however, doesn't feel good much of the time and I suspect it's because she's not careful enough. I don't want to fall into the trap of eliminating the gluten when it's easy and convenient, but not completely. And I figure that if I start off that way, it would be easy to continue that habit. So I'd like to be super careful from the get-go, and thinking about all that that involves is when I find myself getting so overwhelmed.

I'm not trying to have a pity party, I promise! I'm just verbalizing (or writing) my feelings about it to people who have been where I am. Reading about others' improvements is encouraging! I don't know what it's like to wake up without limping, in pain, and feeling rested, and it would be wonderful to have the energy and motivation to tackle my day with enthusiasm!

Thanks!

Jenn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a vicious circle. The pain and fatigue from dealing with the gluten are making you think that you don't have enough energy to get rid of the gluten. Yet if you can stick it through the initial withdrawal and learning curve, it is amazing what energy and zest for life you may discover. Good for you, for seeing that doing things your mom's way doesn't really work. You do have to make it 100% and it does not make it easier if you "ease" into it. I "tried" to quit smoking for many years before I woke up one morning and told myself I had already had my last cigarette :P Never had another.

I personally feel that the only way to avoid cross-contamination is to make the house gluten free - when you think about it most foods (the whole foods) are naturally gluten free. Your husband and children can eat gluten outside the home as much as they want, but not in it. So you could still eat out but you would have to go to places where you could eat too. You will have to discuss this as a family, though - how to keep mommy safe. And don't forget that you should get your children tested too, because they have a good chance of having received the gene from you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just have to add that I too am a mother of 4 and two of my children are gluten free. I often times feel disheartened and overwhelmed but just keep a great stock of gluten free snacks, fruits, veggies, yogurt around just in case. If I can't think of what to fix, I can always grab one of those. The biggest challenge for me is being prepared. I'm unable to just "wing it" when running around. I need to think ahead and have something planned to eat. You can do this:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Mattie-Jack! I am terrible at planning meals ahead of time, so suddenly everyone's hungry and I have nothing prepared to cook. It all boils down to poor planning and time management on my part (although I like to blame all of our away-from-home activities and my husband's work schedule- 2nd shift). Maybe this is God's way of giving me an incentive to work on that. It's certainly going to make my meals healthier! Thanks for the encouragement. I KNOW I can do this, it's just so overwhelming right now that I don't know where to start. I'm working on it one day at a time, but eventually I need to stop eating day-to-day and actually plan meals for grocery shopping, etc. I guess I'll start by cleaning out the pantry! :)

Jenn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your activities are a legitimate excuse! It isn't easy to plan, especially with so many distractions. I actually gave several things to neighbors out of my pantry yesterday. I've also cooked a week's worth of meals out of a new cookbook I was given as a gift - Gluten Free Quick & Easy by Carol Fenster. It has several family friendly meals and several of them build on each other. I've been able to double and freeze to pull out for later. It was a change from my normal routine but doubling takes little extra time but gives us more freedom at dinner time with busy nights. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a really long "what are you cooking tonight" thread here that should give you plenty of ideas! Start simple. Make some rice, bake some chicken pieces, and fix a veggie or make a salad with oil and red wine or basalmic vinegar. Viola! Easy, wholesome gluten-free dinner that requires no label reading.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey there! It's great you are starting off right, by cleaning and looking for cross contamination sources. I agree with whoever said it's much easier to be safe in a gluten free house. Get the kids' bloodwork done before taking them off gluten, though!

You should check out crockpot365 for lots of easy recipes for the crock pot. Focus on veggies and meats rather than packaged stuff and restaurants in general. The change will be worth it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

×