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slee11211

First Time On Plane Celiac

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Europe is actually quite easy and much more celiac-aware than the US. I find traveling around Europe easier than traveling around the US ('m sensitive with multiple allergies as well). I've done it without a kitchen - with a kitchen it would definitely be doable.

I so agree. FAR easier than on the prairies in Canada!

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Hi,

Thanks for your reply!

The Schar Fette Croccanti crackers are amazing. My non-gluten-free husband loves them too. They're just a snack, but they're great. Their little cracker snack packs are good too.

The croissants au chocolat are okay but not awesome, but it's nice if you're missing that kind of thing. You've got to warm them up.

The mini baguettes are good toasted (they crumble completely untoasted) and I've found them fantastic for travel. When we have guests and are touring around with them, I make myself a sandwich in a baguette in the morning and it's always quite tasty at lunch and saves me the worry of finding somewhere to eat.

They have another product, I can't remember the name, that is a sweet breakfast bread. Petit Pain, maybe? Or Pain Matin? Anyway, it's delicious and you don't even need to toast it. Quite sweet, but very good. Definitely a treat.

Their penne and fusili are good.

Where I live we also have a DS-Schar brand that makes a few frozen things - I did not like the lasagne, I do like the tortellini, ravioli, and pizza. They are definitely frozen-food calibre, but within that category I think they're quite good. They also carry a millefoglie pastry crust which would probably be really useful for baking, though I've never tried it.

Bon Appetit!

Thank you for the awesome information! I am saving this for our next trip which we have booked for May. There is a great store with lots of Schar stuff on our way to Croatia in Slovenia.

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I'm also gluten and dairy free and the flight I usually take mainly only serves a refreshment so I can't have a gluten-free meal. I usually just accept it and have a look at what is inside. Ingredients are usually on all the little packets so I just work out what I can have and take the rest with me to give to someone at the other end.

All these other tips are especially useful for me though as I will be flying brisbane-Los angeles in a month or so and not only is it my longest ever flight but the first where I'll be gluten-free/df and actualyl need to eat at some point. Ahh how I wish I could have a stopover.

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I always bring my own snacks/meals on flights and have never had an issue. Sliced apples (or carrots) are delicious dipped in peanut butter, and it gives you that extra protein to keep you satisfied. I bring rice crackers (the Fung Sui brand at my local supermarket, Asian aisle) and whatever I want to put on them. Egg salad, chcken salad, hummus. Sliced cheese works nicely, too.

If you tell the TSA that it is part of a special diet, they will wave your food right through. If you don't want to deal with explaining, however, you can break your objectionable food (peanut butter, hummus, whatever) into small (3 oz) plastic containers. I once brough 4 small containers of peanut butter through. As long as it all fits in a quart sized zipper bag, they won't argue at all.

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