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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    GLUTEN-FREE ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES


    admin

    Celiac.com 02/20/2015 - Here is Celiac.com's most up-to-date list of gluten-free beers and alcoholic beverages.


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    The gluten status of the products listed below is accurate at the present time. However, as product formulations can change without notice, it is best to verify gluten-free product status by checking the ingredients yourself, or by contacting the manufacturer.

    Unless gluten is added after distillation, all distilled alcohols are gluten-free. However, US labeling laws prohibit beverages that use cereal grains at any point in the manufacturing process from advertising themselves as 'gluten-free.'

    Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid distilled beverages that use cereal grains in the manufacturing process, while many others drink them with no adverse effects.

    So, when you do see a 'gluten-free' label on a distilled beverage, it means that no gluten ingredients have been used at any point in the production process.

    A List of Naturally Gluten-free Beers

    • Anheuser-Busch Redbridge
    • Bard's Gold
    • Bard's Tale Beer
    • Brasserie Dupont Forêt Libre
    • Brasseurs Sans Gluten Glutenberg Blanche
    • Brunehaut Bio Ambrée
    • Brunehaut Blonde Bio
    • Brunehaut Blanche
    • Burning Brothers Brewing
    • Coors Peak
    • Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales: Tweason'ale
    • Drummond Gluten Free
    • Epic Brewing Company: Glutenator
    • Ghostfish Brewery
    • Glutenberg American Pale Ale
    • Glutenberg Blonde
    • Glutenberg Belgian Double
    • Glutenberg India Pale Ale
    • Glutenberg Rousse
    • Green's Discovery Amber Ale
    • Green's Endeavour
    • Green's Enterprise Dry-Hopped Lager
    • Green's India Pale Ale
    • Green's Quest Tripel Blonde Ale
    • Ground Breaker Corsa Rose Gold Ale
    • Ground Breaker IPA No. 5
    • Ground Breaker Dark Ale
    • Ipswich Ale Brewery: Celia Saison
    • Joseph James Brewing Fox Tail
    • Lakefront New Grist Ginger Style Ale
    • Lakefront New Grist Pilsner Style
    • Minhas Lazy Mutt Gluten Free
    • Mongozo Premium Pilsener
    • New Planet Belgian Style Ale
    • New Planet Blonde Ale
    • New Planet Pale Ale
    • New Planet Raspberry Ale
    • New Planet Seclusion IPA
    • New Planet Tread Lightly Session Ale
    • Nickel Brook Gluten Free
    • Nouvelle France La Messagère
    • Nouvelle-France Messagère Aux Fruits
    • Nouvelle-France Messagère Red Ale
    • Schnitzer Bräu Hirse Lemon
    • Schnitzer Bräu Hirse Premium
    • Sprecher Brewing Company's Shakparo Ale
    • Steadfast Beer gluten-free Blonde and Pale Ales
    • Steadfast Beer Company's Oatmeal Cream Stout
    • To Øl Reparationsbajer Gluten Free
    • Whistler Forager

    A List of Gluten-Removed Beers

    • Alley Kat Scona Gold Kölsch
    • Brunehaut Bio Tripel
    • Estrella Damm Daura
    • Estrella Damm Daura Marzen
    • Lammsbräu Glutenfrei Lager Beer
    • Mikkeller American Dream Gluten Free
    • Mikkeller Green Gold Gluten Free
    • Mikkeller I Wish Gluten Free IPA
    • Mikkeller Peter, Pale And Mary Gluten Free
    • New Belgium Glutiny brand Golden and Pale Ales
    • Short's Brewing Space Rock
    • Stone Delicious IPA
    • Sufferfest Brewing Company Pale Ale and Lager
    • Widmer Omission Lager
    • Widmer Omission IPA
    • Widmer Omission Pale Ale
    • Wold Top Against The Grain
    • Wold Top Marmalade Porter
    • Wold Top Scarborough Fair IPA

    Gluten-Free Hard Cider

    Most ciders are fermented from apples or other fruits. Most are safe, however, some add barley for enzymes and flavor. Read labels!

    Gluten-free hard cider brands include:

    • Ace Pear Cider
    • Angry Orchard
    • Blue Mountain Cider Company
    • Blackthorn Cider
    • Bulmer's Hard Cider
    • Crispin Cider (including Fox Barrel products)
    • Gaymer Cider Company
    • Harpoon Craft Cider
    • J.K. Scrumpy's Organic Hard Cider
    • Lazy Jack's Cider
    • Magner's Cider
    • Newton's Folly Hard Cider
    • Original Sin Hard Cider
    • Spire Mountain Draft Cider
    • Strongbow Cider
    • Stella Artois Apple and Pear Hard Cidre
    • Woodchuck
    • Woodpecker Cider

    Gluten-Free Wine

    All wines, including brandy, champagne, cognac, port wine, sherry, and vermouth are safe for celiacs.

    Gluten-Free Wine Coolers

    The majority of wine coolers are made from barley products. 

    Gluten-free versions include: 

    • Bartle & Jaymes - all EXCEPT malt beverages
    • Boones - all EXCEPT their malt beverages

    Other Gluten-Free Alcoholic Brews, Wines and Spirits Include

    • Brandy
    • Campari
    • Champagne
    • Cognac—made from grapes
    • Cointreau
    • Grappa
    • Midori
    • Prosecco
    • Khalua Coffee Liquer
    • Kirschwasser (cherry liqueur)
    • Old Deadly Cider
    • Sambuca
    • Vermouth

    Gluten-Free Distilled Alcohols

    Unless gluten is added after distillation, all distilled alcohols are free of gluten. However, US labeling laws prohibit beverages that use cereal grains at any point in the manufacturing process from advertising themselves as 'gluten-free.'

    So, when you do see a 'gluten-free' label on a distilled beverage, it means that no gluten ingredients have been used at any point in the production process.

    Gluten-Free Gin

    Most gins are made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final distilled product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid these beverages, while many others drink them with no adverse effects.

    Gluten-free gin brands include:

    • Cold River Gin—distilled from potatoes

    Brands of standard gin include:

    • Aviation American Gin
    • Beefeater
    • Bombay
    • Bombay Sapphire
    • Boodles British Gin
    • Booth's Gin 
    • Gordon's
    • Leopolds Gin
    • New Amsterdam Gin
    • Seagram's
    • Tanqueray

    Gluten-Free Rum

    Distilled from sugar cane, most rums are gluten-free and safe for celiacs. Beware of pre-made drink mixes, such as those intended for piña coladas — many of these contain gluten ingredients as flavoring.

    Gluten-free rum brands include:

    • Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum
    • Bacardi—only Gold, Superior, 151, and flavored
    • Bayou Rum
    • Bundaberg Rum
    • Captain Morgan Rum
    • Cruzan Rum
    • Malibu Rum
    • Mount Gay Rum
    • Meyer's Rum

    Gluten-Free Sake

    Fermented with rice and Koji enzymes. The Koji enzymes are grown on Miso, which is usually made with barley. The two-product separation from barley, and the manufacturing process should make it safe for celiacs.

    Gluten-Free Tequila

    Made from the agave cactus, all tequilas are gluten-free and safe for celiacs.

    Gluten-free tequila brands include:

    • 1519 Tequila
    • 1800 Tequila
    • Cabo Wabo
    • Cazadores
    • Chimayo
    • Don Julio
    • El Jimador
    • Herradura
    • Hornitos
    • Jose Cuervo
    • Patron
    • Sauza

    Gluten-Free Vodka

    Vodkas distilled from potatoes, gluten-free grains or other gluten-free ingredients contain no gluten ingredients and can be labeled as gluten-free.

    Gluten-free vodka brands include:

    • Corn Vodka—Deep Eddy, Nikolai, Rain, Tito's, UV
    • Grape Vodka—Bombora, Cooranbong
    • Potato Vodka—Boyd & Blair, Cirrus, Chase, Chopin, Cold River Vodka, Cracovia, Grand Teton, Karlsson's, Luksusowa, Monopolowa, Schramm Organic, Zodiac
    • Rice Vodka—Kissui
    • Sugar Cane—Downunder, DOT AU

    Vodkas distilled from cereal grains include:
    Many vodkas made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid these beverages, while many others drink them with no adverse effects.

    • Barley Vodka—Finlandia
    • Grain Vodka—Absolwent, Blavod, Bowman's, Fleischmann's, Orloff, Polonaise, SKYY, Smirnoff, Stolichnaya, 
    • Wheat Vodka—Absolut, Bong Spirit, Danzka, Grey Goose, Hangar One, Ketel One, P.i.n.k Vodka
    • Rye Vodka—Belvedere, BiaÅ‚a Dama, Platinka, Sobieski, Starka, Wisent, Wyborowa, Xellent Swiss, Å»ubrówka

    Gluten-Free Whiskey

    Nearly all whiskeys are made with gluten-containing cereal grains. The final product does not contain gluten, but cannot be advertised or labeled as gluten-free. Many people with celiac disease choose to avoid whiskey, while many others drink it with no adverse effects.

    Gluten-free whiskey brands include:

    • Queen Jennie Whiskey, by Old Sugar Distillery is made entirely from sorghum

    Whiskeys distilled from cereal grains include:

    • Bourbon—Benjamin Prichard's, Booker's, Buffalo Trace, Jim Beam, Early Times, Ezra Brooks, Jefferson's Bourbon, Knob Creek, Makers Mark, Old Crow, Old Forester, Old Grand-Dad
    • Canadian Whiskey—Alberta Premium, Black Velvet, Canadian Club, Crown Royal,
    • Tenesse Whiskey—Jack Daniels, George Dickel.
    • Irish Whiskey—Bushmills, Jameson, Kilbeggan, Redbreast, Tullamore Dew
    • Japanese Blended Whiskey—Hibiki, Kakubin, Nikka, 
    • Japanese Single Malt Whiskey—Hakushu, Yamazaki, Yoichi
    • Rye Whiskey—Alberta Premium, Bulleitt
    • Scotch Whiskey Blends—Ballentine's, Bell's, Black Grouse, Chivas Regal, Cutty Sark, Dewar's, Famous Grouse, Johnnie Walker, Teacher's, Whitehorse
    • Scotch Whiskey Single Malts—Bowmore, Glenfiddich, Glen Grant, The Glenlivet, Glenmorangie, Highland Park, Knockando, Lagavulin, Laphroaig, Macallan, Monkey Shoulder, Singleton, Talisker 
    • Taiwanese Whiskey—Kavalan Classic

    Gluten-Free Drink Mixes

    • Club Extra Dry Martini (corn & grape)
    • Club Vodka Martini (corn & grape)
    • Coco Casa and Coco Lopez Brands: Cream of Coconut
    • Jose Cuervo Brand: Margarita Mix and All Jose Cuervo Blenders
    • Master of Mixes Brand: Tom Collins, Whiskey Sour, Strawberry Daiquiri, Sweet & Sour Mixer, and Margarita Mix
    • Mr. & Mrs. T—Except Bloody Mary Mix
    • TGI Friday's Brand: On The Rocks, Long Island Ice Tea, Margarita, Mudslide, Pina Colada, and Strawberry Daiquiri.
    • TGI Friday's Club Cocktails including: Gin Martini, Manhattan, Screwdriver, Vodka Martini, and Whiskey Sour mix.

    Other Gluten-free Beverages Mixes & Cooking Alcohol

    • Club Tom Collins—made with corn
    • Diamond Jims Bloody Mary Mystery
    • Holland House - all EXCEPT Teriyaki Marinade and Smooth & Spicy Bloody Mary Mixes
    • Mead—made from honey
    • Mistico: Jose Cuervo Mistico—agave and cane
    • Ouzo - made from grapes and anise
    • Spice Islands - Cooking Wines - Burgundy, Sherry and White
    • Also Godiva products contain gluten as do Smirnoff FMB's, Twisted V, and Smirnoff Ice.

    Edited by admin



    Image Caption: Photo: CC--fklv (Obsolete hipster)
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    Guest Courtney

    Posted

    LOVE IT!! Thanks I needed this information for my upcoming wedding.....

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    Guest chelsea

    Posted

    Q: Even though most vodkas are in fact distilled from grain rather than the much thought potato, are they still all gluten-free?

     

    A: (Scott Adams): Yes, distillation removes all prolamines so distilled spirits are considered safe.

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    You agree with the American Dietetic Association which put us in sync with Canada and the EU.

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    I'm finding this very hard to swallow.

    From personal experience, I know that not all grain alcohol based spirits cannot possibly be completely gluten-free. I became deathly ill after consuming a gin martini (zero vermouth) after being completely gluten-free for 3 months. The first thing my co-worker asked me as she was babysitting me in the restaurant's bathroom where I threw up for a solid hour, was if I was on a gluten-free diet. I asked her how she was aware and she said she observed the same thing happen many times before in Hong Kong where our factories were located. Since then, I have avoided gin, any vodka not made from potatoes or grapes, tequila that is not 100% agave, blended scotches and bourbons (I'm sure corn mash bourbon is safe, ie. Maker's Mark, but I have yet to experiment) and pretty much anything that I don't know all the ingredients and how it is made. If it's source is anything but grapes (or other fermented fruits), potatoes, rice, corn, agave, sugar cane..... I wouldn't take the chance personally.

    Same goes for beer: unless it's made from rice or labeled gluten-free, no way Jose. Not worth it.

     

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    Very helpful. Due to celiac I avoided all spirits except tequila. It is good to be informed.

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    Guest Natasha

    Posted

    Thank you, this was very helpful. I'm going to my first party since being diagnosed.

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    Guest Barbara Coots

    Posted

    I agree with #4 since I get sick on any vodka that is not potato. I will remain cautious.

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    I agree with 4 and 7. I stick with my wine and potato vodka with no problems at all. Not even a hint of a hangover. Like anything else when new to the diet grain derived alcohols distilled or not should be consumed with caution until one know how they react.

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    Only drink tequila that is 100% Agave, anything less has other unknown ingredients added. It's more expensive but the good news is you most likely won't have a hangover. As far as Vodka goes, Smirnoff Red Label isn't expensive and is gluten-free. It is made from corn rather than wheat. Ketel One Vodka is 100% wheat but claims to be gluten-free. Go figure. I've tried many of the other brand name Vodkas and I also ended up in the bathroom. The list above is a great place to start but do your own homework.

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    I also agree with #4. I stick with wine and potato vodka. I have had problems when I have used other vodkas.

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    For #4, 7, and 8. It seems many vodkas are only single distilled and poorly at that (thus the burning sensation and smell). If you get a higher end or at least a triple distilled vodka, you should be fine. I would think the same would apply for gin.

     

    I know Smirnoff Triple Distilled is fine. Although, after having Chopin (potato) I have no care to consider any other vodka.

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    Guest bronwhn

    Posted

    I have had problems with grain vodkas. I do not think they are gluten free. Perhaps Scott is correct that the gluten is removed in distillation but perhaps there is grain present at the distillery and that contaminates the final product. Whatever the reason, I have trouble with it.

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    I've just been diagnosed with coeliac disease pending my biopsy scheduled for midday today. I am also going to a birthday party with BIG drinkers this Saturday night. Think I'll be drinking Smirnoff Vodka. The comments above were great. Nice to know I'm not alone.

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    This list is awesome. The other day I though that this is the season for Kahlua and coffee and I was really wondering if it would be safe. Thank you very much!!!

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    This is an excellent resource. I love Chicken Marsala. Is Marsala Wine in the gluten free list?

    I found a recipe and said (gluten free Marsala wine)

    So, is there a Gluten free one?

    Thanks

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    We're also new to celiac disease, my husband has had 2 doctors tell him that's probably what he has, his biopsy is next Wednesday. So we're starting to look into what his diet will likely be. Unfortunately I'm finding a lot of discrepancies from resource to resource. e.g. No ketchup, HEINZ ketchup, ok. Gin bad, gin okay. Grain based vodkas and whiskeys okay as long as they're distilled, only potato vodkas okay, no whiskeys but bourbon and scotch. It's all very confusing. And 'unfortunately' he had no symptoms but anemia, so he can't even go by how he feels from eating or drinking something 'bad' like some of you who get deathly ill from drinking cheap vodka!! What to do, what to do.....

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    Wow! Thank God for you people who forged ahead and 'experimented' for people like us who are still clueless as to what to drink this holiday season. Here I was thinking I shouldn't even socialize in fear of drinking the wrong stuff, but you all saved me and now I don't have to be so bah humbug! I know I can still have wine and anything potato vodka or triple distilled stuff or Kahlua. Let's hope I don't screw up by adding the wrong thing to the alcohol. I guess just juice to keep it safe! Thank you all so much and happy holidays! Here is to a healthier 2008 for all of us!

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    Awesome I have lost a lot of weight and got very sick before they figured I had celiac. I have searched high and low for info and people to talk to. This site is great.

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    Guest Thjomas

    Posted

    I have known that I've had Celiac Disease pretty much all of my life. I have stayed away from all whiskey drinks, malted beverages, and non-gluten free beers and have never been sick (besides drinking too much). To date, I have NOT had a problem with any varieties of vodka, rum, tequila, wine, or gin. I have even consumed a couple of shots worth of Ketel One Vodka one night and still didn't feel sick afterwards. However, Ketel One Vodka sucks and don't waste your time, money, or taste buds.

     

    Usually, if you want to play it safe, stick to rum or gluten-free beer. Here are some examples of gluten-free beer: Bard's Tale Beer, New Grist, and Woodchuck Draft Cider.

     

    For verification, I do get intestinally sick from eating any sort of gluten (wheat, barley, oat, or rye) products, and therefore maintain a strict, gluten free diet. I still feel bitter sometimes about the foods that I cannot eat, but my special diet forces me to eat healthy, and in response, it makes me a healthy person. Celiac Disease in no way means the end of a happy life. I hope that this information helps people.

     

    DISCLAIMER: Everybody has a different reaction to gluten products. Some people's reactions might be more sensitive than other people's response. What I have posted is only my experiences with different kinds of alcohol. Know your own body and how it reacts.

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    Guest Julie Higgins

    Posted

    Very informative.....expanded information on liquors would be helpful.

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    Guest Kathryn

    Posted

    I am not a celiac but I think this web site is fantastic. What a way to help people.

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    This site is very helpful. My doctor discovered that I had Celiac Disease about 3 months ago. So I'm still getting use to it. Thanks

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    Guest Lauren svorc

    Posted

    I am 18 and had it most of my life and about ten others in my family also have it so I am pretty good at knowing what I can and can't have--until my friend said that I may not be able to drink scotch whiskey so I thought I would check out a web site--thanks mate!

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    I'm sure the paid-for version of the list has more details on distillation and etc. Folks need to realize that the reaction they are having after eating or drinking something may not be to that specific food. Reactions can 'brew' inside us for a long time, and something can set off the reaction that was already brewing. I have had celiac disease for 20 years and most my family are celiacs.

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    Guest adrienne  weber

    Posted

    Very confusing info, I thought Ketel One was Potato vodka, I found a vodka called Iceberg Vodka. Their website claims to be gluten free.

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    FD&C Yellow No. 6 Lake
    Ferric Orthophosphate
    Ferrous Gluconate
    Ferrous Fumerate
    Ferrous Lactate
    Ferrous Sulfate
    Fish (fresh)
    Flaked Rice
    Flax
    Folacin
    Folate
    Flavoring
    Flavoring Extracts
    Folic Acid-Folacin
    Food Starch
    Food Starch Modified
    Formaldehyde
    Fructose
    Fruit (including dried)
    Fruit Vinegar
    Fumaric Acid
    Galactose
    Garbanzo Beans
    Gelatin
    Glucoamylase
    Gluconolactone
    Glucose
    Glucose Syrup
    Glutamate (free)
    Glutamic Acid
    Glutamine (amino acid)
    Glutinous Rice
    Glutinous Rice Flour
    Glycerides
    Glycerin
    Glycerol Monooleate
    Glycol Monosterate
    Glycol
    Glycolic acid
    Gram flour (chick peas)
    Grape Skin Extract
    Grits, Corn
    Guar Gum
    Gum Acacia
    Gum Arabic
    Gum Base
    Gum Tragacanth
    Hemp
    Hemp Seeds
    Herbs
    Herb Vinegar
    Hexanedioic Acid
    High Fructose Corn Syrup
    Hominy
    Honey
    Hops
    Horseradish (Pure)
    HPP
    HVP
    Hyacinth Bean
    Hydrogen Peroxide
    Hydrolyzed Caseinate
    Hydrolyzed Meat Protein
    Hydrolyzed Plant Protein
    Hydrolyzed Protein
    Hydrolyzed Soy Protein
    Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein
    Hydroxypropyl Cellulose
    Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose
    Hypromellose
    Illepe
    Iodine
    Inulin
    Invert Sugar
    Iron Ammonium Citrate
    Isinglass
    Isolated Soy Protein
    Isomalt
    Job's Tears
    Jowar (Sorghum)
    Karaya Gum
    Kasha (roasted buckwheat)
    Keratin
    K-Carmine Color
    K-Gelatin
    Koshihikari (rice)
    Kudzu
    Kudzu Root Starch
    Lactalbumin Phosphate
    Lactase
    Lactic Acid
    Lactitol
    Lactose
    Lactulose
    Lanolin
    Lard
    L-cysteine
    Lecithin
    Lemon Grass
    Lentils
    Licorice
    Licorice Extract
    Lipase
    L-leucine
    L-lysine
    L-methionine
    Locust Bean Gum
    L-tryptophan
    Magnesium Carbonate
    Magnesium Hydroxide
    Magnesium Oxide
    Maize
    Maize Waxy
    Malic Acid
    Maltitol
    Maltodextrin (except in pharmaceuticals)
    Maltol
    Maltose
    Manganese Sulfate
    Manioc
    Masa
    Masa Flour
    Masa Harina
    Meat (fresh)
    Medium Chain Triglycerides
    Menhaden Oil
    Methyl Cellulose2
    Microcrystalline Cellulose
    Micro-particulated Egg White Protein
    Milk
    Milk Protein Isolate
    Millet
    Milo (Sorghum)
    Mineral Oil
    Mineral Salts
    Mixed Tocopherols
    Modified Food Starch
    Modified Starch
    Modified food Starch
    Molybdenum Amino Acid Chelate
    Monocalcium Phosphate
    Monoglycerides
    Mono and Diglycerides
    Monopotassium Phosphate
    Monosaccharides
    Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)
    Monostearates
    MSG
    Mung Bean
    Musk
    Mustard Flour
    Myristic Acid
    Natural Flavoring
    Natural Flavors
    Natural Smoke Flavor
    Niacin-Niacinamide
    Neotame
    Niacin
    Niacinamide
    Nitrates
    Nitrous Oxide
    Non-fat Milk
    Nuts (except wheat, rye & barley)
    Nut, Acron
    Nut, Almond
    Oats3
    Oils and Fats
    Oleic Acid
    Oleoresin
    Olestra
    Oleyl Alcohol/Oil
    Orange B
    Oryzanol
    Palmitic Acid
    Pantothenic Acid
    Papain
    Paprika
    Paraffin
    Patially Hydrogenated Cottonseed Oil
    Patially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil
    Peas
    Pea - Chick
    Pea - Cow
    Pea Flour
    Pea Starch
    Peanuts
    Peanut Flour
    Pectin
    Pectinase
    Peppermint Oil
    Peppers
    Pepsin
    Peru Balsam
    Petrolatum
    PGPR (Polyglycerol Polyricinoleate)
    Phenylalanine
    Phosphoric Acid
    Phosphoric Glycol
    Pigeon Peas
    Polenta
    Polydextrose
    Polyethylene Glycol
    Polyglycerol
    Polyglycerol Polyricinoleate (PGPR)
    Polysorbates
    Polysorbate 60
    Polysorbate 80
    Potassium Benzoate
    Potassium Caseinate
    Potassium Citrate
    Potassium Iodide
    Potassium Lactate
    Potassium Matabisulphite
    Potassium Sorbate
    Potatoes
    Potato Flour
    Potato Starch
    Povidone
    Prinus
    Pristane
    Propolis
    Propylene Glycol
    Propylene Glycol Monosterate
    Propyl Gallate
    Protease
    Psyllium
    Pyridoxine Hydrochloride
    Quinoa
    Ragi
    Raisin Vinegar
    Rape
    Recaldent
    Reduced Iron
    Rennet
    Rennet Casein
    Resinous Glaze
    Reticulin
    Riboflavin
    Rice
    Rice (Enriched)
    Rice Flour
    Rice Starch
    Rice Syrup
    Rice Vinegar
    Ricinoleic Acid
    Romano Bean (chickpea)
    Rosematta
    Rosin
    Royal Jelly
    Saccharin
    Saffron
    Sago
    Sago Palm
    Sago Flour
    Sago Starch
    Saifun (bean threads)
    Salt
    Seaweed
    Seeds (except wheat, rye & barley)
    Seed - Sesame
    Seed - Sunflower
    Shea
    Sherry Vinegar
    Silicon Dioxide
    Smoke Flavoring
    Soba (be sure its 100% buckwheat)
    Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate
    Sodium Acetate
    Sodium Alginate
    Sodium Ascorbate
    Sodium Benzoate
    Sodium Caseinate
    Sodium Citrate
    Sodium Erythrobate
    Sodium Hexametaphosphate
    Sodium Lactate
    Sodium Lauryl Sulfate
    Sodium Metabisulphite
    Sodium Nitrate
    Sodium Phosphate
    Sodium Polyphosphate
    Sodium Silaco Aluminate
    Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate
    Sodium Sulphite
    Sodium Stannate
    Sodium Tripolyphosphate
    Sorbic Acid
    Sorbitan Monostearate
    Sorbitol-Mannitol (can cause IBS symptoms)
    Sorghum
    Sorghum Flour
    Soy
    Soybean
    Soy Lecithin
    Soy Protein
    Soy Protein Isolate
    Spices (pure)
    Spirits (Specific Types)
    Spirit Vinegar
    Starch (the single word ingredient is, by law, cornstarch)
    Stearates
    Stearamide
    Stearamine
    Stearic Acid
    Stearyl Lactate
    Stevia
    Subflower Seed
    Succotash (corn and beans)
    Sucralose
    Sucrose
    Sulfosuccinate
    Sulfites
    Sulfur Dioxide
    Sweet Chestnut Flour
    Tagatose
    Tallow
    Tapioca
    Tapioca Flour
    Tapioca Starch
    Tara Gum
    Taro
    Tarro
    Tarrow Root
    Tartaric Acid
    Tartrazine
    TBHQ is Tetra or Tributylhydroquinone
    Tea
    Tea-Tree Oil
    Teff
    Teff Flour
    Tepary Bean
    Textured Vegetable Protein
    Thiamin Hydrochloride
    Thiamine Mononitrate
    Thiamine Hydrochloride
    Titanium Dioxide
    Tofu (Soy Curd)
    Tolu Balsam
    Torula Yeast
    Tragacanth
    Tragacanth Gum
    Triacetin
    Tricalcium Phosphate
    Tri-Calcium Phosphate
    Trypsin
    Turmeric (Kurkuma)
    TVP
    Tyrosine
    Urad/Urid Beans
    Urad/Urid Dal (peas) Vegetables
    Urad/Urid flour
    Urd
    Vinegar (All except Malt)
    Vanilla Extract
    Vanilla Flavoring
    Vanillin
    Vinegars (Specific Types - Except Malt Vinegar)
    Vitamin A (retinol)
    Vitamin A Palmitate
    Vitamin B1
    Vitamin B-12
    Vitamin B2
    Vitamin B6
    Vitamin D
    Vitamin E Acetate
    Waxy Maize
    Whey
    Whey Protein Concentrate
    Whey Protein Isolate
    White Vinegar
    Wines
    Wine Vinegars (& Balsamic)
    Wild Rice
    Xanthan Gum
    Xylitol
    Yam Flour
    Yeast (except brewer's yeast)
    Yogurt (plain, unflavored)
    Zinc Oxide
    Zinc Sulfate
    1) Cellulose is a carbohydrate polymer of D-glucose. It is the structural material of plants, such as wood in trees. It contains no gluten protein. 2) Methyl cellulose is a chemically modified form of cellulose that makes a good substitute for gluten in rice-based breads, etc. 3) Recent research indicates that oats may be safe for people on gluten-free diets, although many people may also have an additional, unrelated intolerance to them. Cross contamination with wheat is also a factor that you need to consider before choosing to include oats in your diet.

    admin

    Rice and soy beverages because their production process may utilize barley enzymes. Bad advice from health food store employees (i.e., that spelt and/or kamut is/are safe for celiacs). Cross-contamination between food store bins selling raw flours and grains (usually via the scoops). Wheat-bread crumbs in butter, jams, toaster, counter, etc. Lotions, creams and cosmetics (primarily for those with dermatitis herpetaformis). Stamps, envelopes or other gummed labels. Toothpaste and mouthwash. Medicines: many contain gluten. Cereals: most contain malt flavoring, or some other non-gluten-free ingredient. Some brands of rice paper. Sauce mixes and sauces (soy sauce, fish sauce, catsup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc.). Ice cream. Packet & canned soups. Dried meals and gravy mixes. Laxatives. Grilled restaurant food - gluten contaminated grill. Fried restaurant foods - gluten contaminated grease. Ground spices - wheat flour is sometimes used to prevent clumping.

    admin

    Celiac.com 07/12/2004 - There have been numerous claims that traditional barley-based beers are gluten free or that all beers are gluten free. Unfortunately, the area is very grey and substantiated on technicalities. The purpose of this post is to eliminate the confusion about gluten as it relates to beer. Gluten is an umbrella term used to describe a mixture of individual proteins found in many grains. Celiac disease (celiac sprue or gluten intolerance, gluten sensitivity) is an autoimmune disorder that is triggered by the ingestion of some of these glutens. People with classic celiac disease are intolerant to the gluten proteins found in wheat, barley, rye, spelt and a couple other lesser known grains. All these grains have a relative of the gluten protein. Interestingly, corn, rice and sorghum also have gluten proteins but are not toxic to celiacs. Herein lies one of the fundamental problems; the use of the term gluten intolerance to cover only certain gluten containing grains is confusing for consumers and food manufacturers alike. Unfortunately, it seems that the inertia for using celiac disease and gluten intolerance as synonyms is unstoppable. Therefore, it becomes the responsibility of both consumers and manufacturers to make sure the terms being discussed are defined and understood.
    As this relates to beer, there is a gluten protein found in barley. This protein is known as hordein. Wheat gluten is known as gliadin. Rye gluten is known as secalin. Presently, assay tests (or lab tests) are only commercially available for the testing of gliadin. We are unaware of any tests for hordein or any manufacturer that presently tests for hordein (Note: If you know of anyone that does in fact test specifically for hordein, please let us know). Therefore the idea that a barley based beer can be considered gluten free based upon the lack of testing is very difficult to fathom. It should be understood that a company using an assay test for gliadin to test for hordein will not return accurate results.
    There has been widespread speculation that the brewing process eliminates these hordein proteins making all beers gluten-free. Although commercial assay tests for hordein are not available there is conclusive evidence that the brewing process does not degrade hordein to non-toxic levels. A research study in Australia on improving beer haze shows that hordein is still present in beer after the brewing process (http://www.regional.org.au/au/abts/1999/sheehan.htm). Therefore, claims that hordein or gluten is destroyed in the brewing process is unsubstantiated and clearly, based upon the Australian research, is highly questionable.
    Based upon the continuous claims by beer companies that beers are gluten free, it is clear that the issue is misunderstood and, as always, it is up to the consumer to educate them on the facts. Hopefully, the information provided here will give consumers and manufacturers alike the ability to discuss these gluten issues intelligently and effectively.
    About the author: Kevin Seplowitz is the President and Co-founder of the Bards Tale Research Company, LLC and organization that researches the correlations between nutrition, diet, and autoimmune disorders. Bards Tale Research owns and operates Bards Tale Beer Company, LLC (www.bardsbeer.com) a company that develops commercial gluten-free beers. Mr. Seplowitz is a diagnosed Celiac.

    Megan Tichy

    What is Gluten?
    Gluten is a huge molecule held together by smaller molecules linked together called amino acids. A very tiny part of the gluten molecule can initiate a response. If each amino acid that makes up gluten is represented as a single letter that very tiny part would be: SGQGSFQPSQQ. There are other sequences of amino acids that cause a reaction in gluten sensitive individuals, but the point is, as tiny as this fragment is with respect to the entire gluten protein, it is still HUGE with respect to the size of ethanol (the stuff you are drinking).
    What is Alcohol?
    The alcohol you drink is ethanol. Ethanol is smaller than the size of the smallest amino acid in the smallest fragment of gluten that has been shown to initiate an autoimmune reaction. More specifically, ethanol is about 10 atomic mass units smaller than just the G in the sequence shown above.
    What are Amino Acids?
    The G is glycine, and by the way, each of these amino acids (represented by letters) by themselves is safe, and sold at most health food stores. For example Q = glutamine (yes, “L-glutamine,” the same amino acid mentioned in a recent post and used to heal intestinal damage). If the protein is viewed as beads on a string, then one of those beads might be good for you, but certain sequences strung together can initiate an allergic reaction of many types from acute peanut allergy to less-than-obvious gluten sensitivity.
    What is Distillation?
    When a distillation is performed, pure ethanol is separated away from all of the other “stuff” that forms as a result of fermentation. This is because ethanol is volatile (meaning it becomes a gas in the distillation process). Imagine a vat of fermentation products, you heat it, and only the volatile molecules like ethanol enter a tube attached to the vat. This tube is not just any tube - it is a curved condensation tube! Here is what it does: While the heated gas form of ethanol floats into it (because that is what gases do), the molecules are cooled and condense back into a liquid, and fall into a new sparkling clean vessel containing the stuff that intoxicates you and any other volatiles. So the fancier distillation columns that are actually used industrially also purify the ethanol away from other volatiles. Gluten does not stand a chance of “crossing over” because it is not volatile.
    Here is a simplified analogy. Let's say you put some sand in the bottom of your tea kettle. If you take the spout off your tea kettle, and attach a condensing tube to the opening (a curved tube would be the simplest type of condensing tube but there are many elaborate types), you could distill your water away from the sand. The condensing tube would be curved so as to open into a new clean pot. Let us pretend that the sand is gluten and the water is ethanol. When you heat to the boiling point, the liquid becomes gas so it travels into the condenser, cools and becomes liquid, then falls into the clean pot.
    Now having read that, is there any way that the new clean pot would contain any sand? No, and distilled alcohol (ethanol) does not contain any gluten. Remember, gluten is not volatile. Another non-volatile compound is table salt. So you could perform a distillation at home, with salt water. Has anyone ever inadvertently done this? Boiled a pot of salt water, perhaps to make some Tinkyada pasta, and walked away to do something else. You came back to find your pot almost empty with white crusty stuff (salt) all inside the pot.
    So the gluten is left behind in a distillation process. If malt is added to the distilled product it will be disclosed on the ingredients label.
    What is Vinegar?
    Vinegar is formed by fermentation in a similar way that ethanol is formed by fermentation. The process is to take ethanol and ferment it with bacteria. Later, there is a filtration to remove the bacteria. Rarely, vinegar is fermented from wheat-based alcohol. “Distilled vinegar,” gets its name from the fact that it was fermented from distilled alcohol.
    Why is Vinegar Still Questioned?
    The answer could be, perhaps, because so many people report a reaction to it and vinegar-based products. The never-ending fear is that cross-contamination during the fermentation process is leading to barely detectable amounts of gluten in the finished product (by barely detectable, I mean in terms of commercially available tests). Since the vinegar is rarely distilled post fermentation from the ethanol, the “messy” nature of the second fermentation step could pose a problem, especially for highly sensitive individuals. If the alcohol gets all used up by the bacteria, the bacteria go on to form carbon dioxide and water from the vinegar. So alcohol is periodically added in the fermentation process. Conceivably, one “shortcut” would be to just add beer at this juncture. Adding beer or some other form of cheap malted alcohol would keep the culture alive, and increase the “quality” and yield of the vinegar. Another fear is that the bacterial “mother” as it is called, contains trace gluten through cross-contamination. Claims that these practices actually take place are unsubstantiated by evidence.
    Why are Distilled Spirits Still Questioned?
    That is a good question, I do not know.Take a Short Quiz on this Topic:
    You bought mustard and pickles at the grocery store. These products contain “distilled vinegar” according to the ingredients labels, and the label does NOT say “contains: wheat.” Are the mustard and pickles gluten-free? Rum, gin, whiskey, and vodka are distilled beverages. If they are not flavored with something that contains wheat (would be declared on the label), rye, or barley (usually in the form of “malt”), are they gluten-free?  What is wrong with the following statements (they have all been cut and pasted from various blogs and forums on the topic of celiac disease)?a. “Most alcohols are distilled in such a way that any wheat gluten is no longer present.”b. “Even trace amounts of gluten that make it past the filter system can be harmful.”c. “It seems improbable to me, too, that gliadin could survive the distillation process.”

    Answers:
    Yes, unless you have reason to believe otherwise, in which case you should simply avoid them.
    Yes.
    3a. All alcohols, if distilled, have been removed from any type of gluten.
    3b. Distillation is nothing like a filtration. We are not separating small from large, there is no filter. Filtration would be like how your coffee pot separates water from the coffee grains. A tear in the filter would result in a big problem, right? Filtration is a separation based on size, distillation is a separation based on volatility.
    3c. Do we care whether gliadin (a name given to part of wheat gluten) “survives” the process or not? No, because it has been left behind to stew in its own juices in the distillation pot. Your stuff (the ethanol) has floated away, and entered a new, clean pot. Some people have this idea that we heat the fermented mixture to smithereens and it somehow decomposes the molecules of gluten. Clearly, such a process would be ineffective or else we could simply “cook,” “roast,” “fry,” or “burn” the gluten out of our foods, and we know that we cannot do that.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com

    admin
    WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?
    Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that affects around 1% of the population. People with celiac disease suffer an autoimmune reaction when they consume wheat, rye or barley. The immune reaction is triggered by certain proteins in the wheat, rye, or barley, and, left untreated, causes damage to the small, finger-like structures, called villi, that line the gut. The damage occurs as shortening and villous flattening in the lamina propria and crypt regions of the intestines. The damage to these villi then leads to numerous other issues that commonly plague people with untreated celiac disease, including poor nutritional uptake, fatigue, and myriad other problems.
    Celiac disease mostly affects people of Northern European descent, but recent studies show that it also affects large numbers of people in Italy, China, Iran, India, and numerous other places thought to have few or no cases.
    Celiac disease is most often uncovered because people experience symptoms that lead them to get tests for antibodies to gluten. If these tests are positive, then the people usually get biopsy confirmation of their celiac disease. Once they adopt a gluten-free diet, they usually see gut healing, and major improvements in their symptoms. 
    CLASSIC CELIAC DISEASE SYMPTOMS
    Symptoms of celiac disease can range from the classic features, such as diarrhea, upset stomach, bloating, gas, weight loss, and malnutrition, among others.
    LESS OBVIOUS SYMPTOMS
    Celiac disease can often less obvious symptoms, such fatigue, vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, anemia, to name a few. Often, these symptoms are regarded as less obvious because they are not gastrointestinal in nature. You got that right, it is not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have few or no gastrointestinal symptoms. That makes spotting and connecting these seemingly unrelated and unclear celiac symptoms so important.
    NO SYMPTOMS
    Currently, most people diagnosed with celiac disease do not show symptoms, but are diagnosed on the basis of referral for elevated risk factors. 

    CELIAC DISEASE VS. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE
    Gluten intolerance is a generic term for people who have some sort of sensitivity to gluten. These people may or may not have celiac disease. Researchers generally agree that there is a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. That term has largely replaced the term gluten-intolerance. What’s the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity? 
    CELIAC DISEASE VS. NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY (NCGS)
    Gluten triggers symptoms and immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Gluten can also trigger symptoms in some people with NCGS, but the similarities largely end there.

    There are four main differences between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity:
    No Hereditary Link in NCGS
    Researchers know for certain that genetic heredity plays a major role in celiac disease. If a first-degree relative has celiac disease, then you have a statistically higher risk of carrying genetic markers DQ2 and/or DQ8, and of developing celiac disease yourself. NCGS is not known to be hereditary. Some research has shown certain genetic associations, such as some NCGS patients, but there is no proof that NCGS is hereditary. No Connection with Celiac-related Disorders
    Unlike celiac disease, NCGS is so far not associated with malabsorption, nutritional deficiencies, or a higher risk of autoimmune disorders or intestinal malignancies. No Immunological or Serological Markers
    People with celiac disease nearly always test positive for antibodies to gluten proteins. Researchers have, as yet, identified no such antobodies or serologic markers for NCGS. That means that, unlike with celiac disease, there are no telltale screening tests that can point to NCGS. Absence of Celiac Disease or Wheat Allergy
    Doctors diagnose NCGS only by excluding both celiac disease, an IgE-mediated allergy to wheat, and by the noting ongoing adverse symptoms associated with gluten consumption. WHAT ABOUT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) AND IRRITABLE BOWEL DISEASE (IBD)?
    IBS and IBD are usually diagnosed in part by ruling out celiac disease. Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome are sensitive to gluten. Many experience celiac disease-like symptoms in reaction to wheat. However, patients with IBS generally show no gut damage, and do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin and other proteins as do people with celiac disease. Some IBS patients also suffer from NCGS.

    To add more confusion, many cases of IBS are, in fact, celiac disease in disguise.

    That said, people with IBS generally react to more than just wheat. People with NCGS generally react to wheat and not to other things, but that’s not always the case. Doctors generally try to rule out celiac disease before making a diagnosis of IBS or NCGS. 
    Crohn’s Disease and celiac disease share many common symptoms, though causes are different.  In Crohn’s disease, the immune system can cause disruption anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, and a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease typically requires more diagnostic testing than does a celiac diagnosis.  
    Crohn’s treatment consists of changes to diet and possible surgery.  Up to 10% of Crohn's patients can have both of conditions, which suggests a genetic connection, and researchers continue to examine that connection.
    Is There a Connection Between Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Large Number of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Sensitive To Gluten Some IBD Patients also Suffer from Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Many Cases of IBS and Fibromyalgia Actually Celiac Disease in Disguise CELIAC DISEASE DIAGNOSIS
    Diagnosis of celiac disease can be difficult. 

    Perhaps because celiac disease presents clinically in such a variety of ways, proper diagnosis often takes years. A positive serological test for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase is considered a very strong diagnostic indicator, and a duodenal biopsy revealing villous atrophy is still considered by many to be the diagnostic gold standard. 
    But this idea is being questioned; some think the biopsy is unnecessary in the face of clear serological tests and obvious symptoms. Also, researchers are developing accurate and reliable ways to test for celiac disease even when patients are already avoiding wheat. In the past, patients needed to be consuming wheat to get an accurate test result. 
    Celiac disease can have numerous vague, or confusing symptoms that can make diagnosis difficult.  Celiac disease is commonly misdiagnosed by doctors. Read a Personal Story About Celiac Disease Diagnosis from the Founder of Celiac.com Currently, testing and biopsy still form the cornerstone of celiac diagnosis.
    TESTING
    There are several serologic (blood) tests available that screen for celiac disease antibodies, but the most commonly used is called a tTG-IgA test. If blood test results suggest celiac disease, your physician will recommend a biopsy of your small intestine to confirm the diagnosis.
    Testing is fairly simple and involves screening the patients blood for antigliadin (AGA) and endomysium antibodies (EmA), and/or doing a biopsy on the areas of the intestines mentioned above, which is still the standard for a formal diagnosis. Also, it is now possible to test people for celiac disease without making them concume wheat products.

    BIOPSY
    Until recently, biopsy confirmation of a positive gluten antibody test was the gold standard for celiac diagnosis. It still is, but things are changing fairly quickly. Children can now be accurately diagnosed for celiac disease without biopsy. Diagnosis based on level of TGA-IgA 10-fold or more the ULN, a positive result from the EMA tests in a second blood sample, and the presence of at least 1 symptom could avoid risks and costs of endoscopy for more than half the children with celiac disease worldwide.

    WHY A GLUTEN-FREE DIET?
    Currently the only effective, medically approved treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. Following a gluten-free diet relieves symptoms, promotes gut healing, and prevents nearly all celiac-related complications. 
    A gluten-free diet means avoiding all products that contain wheat, rye and barley, or any of their derivatives. This is a difficult task as there are many hidden sources of gluten found in the ingredients of many processed foods. Still, with effort, most people with celiac disease manage to make the transition. The vast majority of celiac disease patients who follow a gluten-free diet see symptom relief and experience gut healing within two years.
    For these reasons, a gluten-free diet remains the only effective, medically proven treatment for celiac disease.
    WHAT ABOUT ENZYMES, VACCINES, ETC.?
    There is currently no enzyme or vaccine that can replace a gluten-free diet for people with celiac disease.
    There are enzyme supplements currently available, such as AN-PEP, Latiglutetenase, GluteGuard, and KumaMax, which may help to mitigate accidental gluten ingestion by celiacs. KumaMax, has been shown to survive the stomach, and to break down gluten in the small intestine. Latiglutenase, formerly known as ALV003, is an enzyme therapy designed to be taken with meals. GluteGuard has been shown to significantly protect celiac patients from the serious symptoms they would normally experience after gluten ingestion. There are other enzymes, including those based on papaya enzymes.

    Additionally, there are many celiac disease drugs, enzymes, and therapies in various stages of development by pharmaceutical companies, including at least one vaccine that has received financial backing. At some point in the not too distant future there will likely be new treatments available for those who seek an alternative to a lifelong gluten-free diet. 

    For now though, there are no products on the market that can take the place of a gluten-free diet. Any enzyme or other treatment for celiac disease is intended to be used in conjunction with a gluten-free diet, not as a replacement.

    ASSOCIATED DISEASES
    The most common disorders associated with celiac disease are thyroid disease and Type 1 Diabetes, however, celiac disease is associated with many other conditions, including but not limited to the following autoimmune conditions:
    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: 2.4-16.4% Multiple Sclerosis (MS): 11% Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: 4-6% Autoimmune hepatitis: 6-15% Addison disease: 6% Arthritis: 1.5-7.5% Sjögren’s syndrome: 2-15% Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: 5.7% IgA Nephropathy (Berger’s Disease): 3.6% Other celiac co-morditities include:
    Crohn’s Disease; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Chronic Pancreatitis Down Syndrome Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Lupus Multiple Sclerosis Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Psoriasis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Turner Syndrome Ulcerative Colitis; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Williams Syndrome Cancers:
    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (intestinal and extra-intestinal, T- and B-cell types) Small intestinal adenocarcinoma Esophageal carcinoma Papillary thyroid cancer Melanoma CELIAC DISEASE REFERENCES:
    Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University
    Gluten Intolerance Group
    National Institutes of Health
    U.S. National Library of Medicine
    Mayo Clinic
    University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/17/2018 - Could the holy grail of gluten-free food lie in special strains of wheat that lack “bad glutens” that trigger the celiac disease, but include the “good glutens” that make bread and other products chewy, spongey and delicious? Such products would include all of the good things about wheat, but none of the bad things that might trigger celiac disease.
    A team of researchers in Spain is creating strains of wheat that lack the “bad glutens” that trigger the autoimmune disorder celiac disease. The team, based at the Institute for Sustainable Agriculture in Cordoba, Spain, is making use of the new and highly effective CRISPR gene editing to eliminate the majority of the gliadins in wheat.
    Gliadins are the gluten proteins that trigger the majority of symptoms for people with celiac disease.
    As part of their efforts, the team has conducted a small study on 20 people with “gluten sensitivity.” That study showed that test subjects can tolerate bread made with this special wheat, says team member Francisco Barro. However, the team has yet to publish the results.
    Clearly, more comprehensive testing would be needed to determine if such a product is safely tolerated by people with celiac disease. Still, with these efforts, along with efforts to develop vaccines, enzymes, and other treatments making steady progress, we are living in exciting times for people with celiac disease.
    It is entirely conceivable that in the not-so-distant future we will see safe, viable treatments for celiac disease that do not require a strict gluten-free diet.
    Read more at Digitaltrends.com , and at Newscientist.com