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I'm kind of new to the whole Celiac/ gluten free world as I was just recently diagnosed and am confused about 1 thing.... For example: they say Sprite Zero is considered Gluten Free but up to 20 ppm... In a 12oz can, how much is 20ppm? I need help with this or some kind of converter haha. Thank you!

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The new law that went into effect this month states that in order to be labeled gluten-free, an item must be tested. The test they usually use will tell them if an item has MORE than 20 ppm, in which case they can't make a gluten-free claim. But that doesn't mean it actually has 20 ppm. It could be anywhere between 20 ppm and zero ppm. 20 ppm is considered safe for the large majority of celiacs. You don't need a converter. It wouldn't do you any good anyway.

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Sprite Zero has no gluten-containing ingredients. There is no reasonable concern about cross-contamination. None of The Coca-Cola Company's carbonated beverages contain gluten. So it is very likely zero parts per million. But, if there were twenty parts per million in a 12 ounce can, it would be 0.00024 ounces. As Bartful said, zero is less than twenty.

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ppm means parts per million.  One ppm means that in one million parts of the food or drink, there will be one part of gluten.  A part could be a cup, a pound, or a serving.  A study found that the vast majority of celiacs are safe with under 10 mg of gluten per day: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17209192

 

According to Fasano: "would be equivalent to the daily ingestion of more than a pound of gluten free products containing 20 ppm of gluten!"

http://www.glutenfreediet.ca/img/Fasano_letter.pdf

 

That being said.  Not all of us are in that vast majority.  I think that there is a possibility for a tiny amount of contamination from the corn syrup as corn can contain wheat contamination from farming practices.  The USDA allows for up to 10% of other grains in corn: http://www.gipsa.usda.gov/fgis/standards/810corn.pdf

That last link isn't working.  You can google USDA corn definition.

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