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Hello,

I had surgery to remove the bladder 3 months ago, and when I turned 40 days of surgery began to feel thoracic pain. The doctor requested the tests IgG gliadin antibody, IgA, IgG endomysial all positivized. It is possible that these antibodies suffer change immediately after surgery gallbladder but non-celiac patient is? As if my body was to rebalance after surgery?

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It appears that surgery is one thing that can trigger Celiac disease.

 

Just want to add - once you have Celiac , you always have Celiac.  It isn't an "imbalance" and can't be reversed.  The only current treatment for Celiac disease is a gluten free diet.

 

Edited by kareng

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5 hours ago, Viviane Souza said:

Hello,

I had surgery to remove the bladder 3 months ago, and when I turned 40 days of surgery began to feel thoracic pain. The doctor requested the tests IgG gliadin antibody, IgA, IgG endomysial all positivized. It is possible that these antibodies suffer change immediately after surgery gallbladder but non-celiac patient is? As if my body was to rebalance after surgery?

Hi Viviane,

No, the antibodies to gliaden are learned by the immune system.  They won't be forgotten by the immune system ever.  The antibodies to gliaden are specific to the protein gliaden that is part of wheat protein.  Once learned, the learning never goes away.

Usually the doctor will do an endoscopy to confirm celiac disease damage to the gut lining (villi).  The endoscopy is usually after a positive antibody test, which you had already it sounds like.  You shouldn't stop eating gluten until the endoscopy is completed and test results are received.  If you stop eating gluten too soon, the test results can be faulty.

Several people have reported having their gall bladders removed before being diagnosed with celiac disease.  Gallbladder problems and celiac disease seem to go together for some people.

Welcome to the forum! :)

Edited by GFinDC

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20 hours ago, GFinDC said:

Hi Viviane,

No, the antibodies to gliaden are learned by the immune system.  They won't be forgotten by the immune system ever.  The antibodies to gliaden are specific to the protein gliaden that is part of wheat protein.  Once learned, the learning never goes away.

Usually the doctor will do an endoscopy to confirm celiac disease damage to the gut lining (villi).  The endoscopy is usually after a positive antibody test, which you had already it sounds like.  You shouldn't stop eating gluten until the endoscopy is completed and test results are received.  If you stop eating gluten too soon, the test results can be faulty.

Several people have reported having their gall bladders removed before being diagnosed with celiac disease.  Gallbladder problems and celiac disease seem to go together for some people.

Welcome to the forum! :)

Tks

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