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RecycleDiva

Model # please

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Are you asking about a setting on a bread machine?  I can not imagine a gluten-free setting on a mixer.  


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

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Why would a stand mixer have a gluten-free setting?  What does that mean?  There is no special way to mix gluten-free cookies, cake, etc.  Just buy the one in the color you like.  
 

I will suggest you buy one that uses all metal attachments - not those white coated ones.  They seem to peel off after a lot of use.  


 

 

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All bread machines have built-mixers (paddle), but you would not use a bread machine to mix up a cake or cookies.  It is designed to knead dough.  The gluten free setting most likely does not knead heavily and shortens the time by skipping a second knead and rise,  which is needed for wheat bread.  

I had a bread machine 20 years ago or more. I found it very handy because I was working and it takes time to knead dough and then allow it to rise (twice).  When hubby went gluten free, I stopped using it.  I did continue to bake once I started working from home.  I had time to knead and let dough rise.  I baked everything from loaves, brioche to burger buns.  (It is no wonder my hubby said that when I was diagnosed and I stopped baking gluten filled items, that he felt really good.  I was probably glutening him.  No proof, but I would not advise baking if someone in the house is gluten free.  Too risky.)

I bake all the same things now, but only gluten free.   I have time to mix, let rise and stick my bread into the oven.  For a working person, a bread machine could be very useful.  

As far as mixers, I just use a hand held one.  My kitchen is small and I do not have space for a larger mixer.  Someday, if I become weak and frail, I will consider it.  Most of the time, I use a wooden spoon.  Great way to work my arms!  

Edited by cyclinglady

Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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