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sjust

Starting A Gluten Free Diet

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I have decided to take my entire house gluten free. I worry that the cc to my daughter is too great and also question whether my 3 year old might be gluten intolerant. My concern is how do change a 3 year old who is use to breads, pasta's ect. over to a gluten free lifestyle? Also, snack ideas would be great. This is going to be hard for him I suspect but want to make the transition as easy as possible.

Thank you

Sarah


Sarah 29 gluten-free for daughter since March 2007

Rebecca 12/21/06 apppears to be sensitive to all foods FFT

Robbie 1/12/07 cashew allergy, doing better off gluten

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I have a 3 year old daughter and we've been gluten free (as a family) for a couple of months now. The biggest mistake I made in the beginning was thinking that we had to have substitutes for everything we ate prior to going gluten free, such as bread, crackers, muffins, pancakes and whatnot. My DD HATES gluten free bread! We've tried just about every brand and mix we can find - and I admit, some of them are pretty gross. I bought a lot of cookbooks and specialty flours, tried making bread, tried eating like we did before, only substituting. Yuck.

The biggest help was changing my thinking. We now eat foods that are naturally gluten free without having to substitute. Rice pasta is good though. And now we use corn tortillas instead of the flour ones, but that's not a "specialty" item. Lunches have been the biggest challenge. I'm at home with the kids full time, so I just cook at lunch like I would at dinner and not rely on sandwiches. Fruit is good for snacks, or tortilla chips with bean dip, or celery and peanut butter (if you can have peanuts), yougurt if you can have dairy. I think the biggest thing for a 3 year old is not to think that the gluten free specialty items are going to "fool" them into thinking they are getting what they are used to. They just don't taste the same.

Lays plain potato chips are gluten free - and if you can have dairy, there's always ranch dip - you might need to make your own or just make sure the one you get doesn't have anything in the spices that contains gluten.

My DD is also allergic to dairy, soy and eggs. So we've gone gluten free, dairy free, soy free and egg free. Quite a challenge, but I'm always surprised at how many good things we eat are naturally free of that stuff anyway. But we have to cook it ourselves most of the time and not rely on pre-packaged or processed food. A big pot of chili is always good too. My favorite cookbook is The Gluten Free Kitchen by Roben Ryberg - it has a really good gluten free fried chicken recipe in it that is really, really good! And I use it to make chicken nuggets for the kids and they love it! I've used it for homemade fish sticks too and it's really good.

Hope that helps some.

Beth

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ALso, after you've been gluten free for awhile, you can re-introduce things that you, and your child, wouldn't accept before, especially, as the previous poster stated, after you've changed your thinking.

We do roll-ups with thin, bendable slices of cheese and gluten free sandwich meat, and now he'll eat lettuce, too. We found one gluten free bread recipe that has completely changed the way we think of gluten free bread, http://www.recipezaar.com/190906 . I substitute sorghum flour and brown rice flour for the gluten free flour and garbanza fava bean flour and add a tiny bit more of honey, but otherwise we follow it almost exactly. You need to freeze it after 2 days, but we normally go through all of it before those two days are up.

But before we found that, we used large Corn Thins (thin, large crackers made from popped corn) for our sandwiches. They don't taste like bread or regular crackers, but they do taste like popcorn. So it is a familiar flavor; our kids, and nearly every other two to four year old who have asked for bites, really like them. We make peanut butter "sandwiches" with them, and also put sandwich meat, lettuce, cheese, etc. on them.

I also make "trail mixes" with easy to chew nuts (like pecans, broken up peanuts, etc.), gluten free cereals like EnviroKidz Gorilla Munch (it's like a cross between Kix and Captain Crunch - slightly sweeter than Kix but way less sweeter than Captain Crunch), dried fruit, and Terra Chips (root vegetable chips). That's our regular snack. We also love Bumble Bars over here - we call them "birdseed bars." They're made with small, easy to chew seeds (like sesame seeds and flax seed), brown rice, honey, and sometimes small pieces of nuts, depending on the flavor. And of course, lots of fruit and veggies with dip.

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I saw that recipe for bread and thought it sounded good. Do you substitute the same amount of brown rice flour as it calls for gluten free flour and the same amount of sourgham as garfava flour? I would like to try to make it.

Thank you for the advice. I will definately try to not replace old favorites with new ones. Luckily I found a tortilla recipe that he likes better than the gluten one. The other big hurdles will be not having chicken nuggets or bagels.


Sarah 29 gluten-free for daughter since March 2007

Rebecca 12/21/06 apppears to be sensitive to all foods FFT

Robbie 1/12/07 cashew allergy, doing better off gluten

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It is hard but do-able. What you kinda have to do is just avoid the loved foods for a bit before you entroduce the sub, that way the child forgets what it use to taste like. The whole house eatting gluten-free is much easier. Ener-G bread to me looks very simular to a regular slice of bread and grilling or toasting it deffinately is more tollerable that eatting it alone. It does have a different texture. If he is into chicken nuggets you can make your own or whole foods has the wellshire farms ones that taste yummy and are in the shape of dinosaurs.

For my son the hardest thing was crackers. He loved saltines and other crackers and totally refused any subs that were a gluten-free option. So we basically just did not have crackers for about 2 months and now he will tollerate a few of the glutino ones.

For pasta rice pasta and corn pasta are easy to switch out without anyone noticing. I prefer corn pasta over the rice, but everyone else in my home will eat either.

Remember eatting gluten-free is much healthier. this site gives some good kid friendly ideas

gfcfrecipes.com

I say eat the way you normally eat just use the subs for the gluten items. And don't forget to talk with him about it. I told my son that wheat makes his tummy hurt and I want him to feel good so we don't eat wheat anymore. My son accepted it much better than I thought.

The hardest part for us is eatting out and having to take your own food with you pretty much everywhere! We've had to say goodbye at spir of the minute drive thru windows on a friday night.


Janel (me): gluten-free since 4/10/07; casien free 5/1/07;soy light 10/07

**LOST 35 lbs since April 2007(much needed weight loss)**

ds(6 yrs)- gluten-free since 3/19/07; casein free 5/2/07;soy free 10/07

HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 7,7)

new dx= Hirschsprungs Disease w/cecostomy

the non believers, only allergen free eatting at home because they have to be:

Hubby: refuses to eat Gluten-free Casein-free except for dinner

dd(14 yrs)- refuses to go along with any special dietary retrictions *I suspect dairy/wheat intollerant*

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this site might be helpful to you, eventhough your son is not autistic. It gives a great timeline on how to go Gluten-free Casein-free in 10 weeks.

http://tacanow.com/gfcf_diet_10_weeks.htm


Janel (me): gluten-free since 4/10/07; casien free 5/1/07;soy light 10/07

**LOST 35 lbs since April 2007(much needed weight loss)**

ds(6 yrs)- gluten-free since 3/19/07; casein free 5/2/07;soy free 10/07

HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 7,7)

new dx= Hirschsprungs Disease w/cecostomy

the non believers, only allergen free eatting at home because they have to be:

Hubby: refuses to eat Gluten-free Casein-free except for dinner

dd(14 yrs)- refuses to go along with any special dietary retrictions *I suspect dairy/wheat intollerant*

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For the bread recipe I use 1 cup sorghum flour and 1/2 cup brown rice flour (equals to the 1 1/4 cup gluten free flour and 1/4 cup garfava flour.) I also often use a tiny bit more flax seed, maybe closer to 1/3 cup. I use my bread machine and keep it on the regular 2 lb. wheat bread setting. Or I use rapid rise yeast and bake it on the 2 lb. rapid rise wheat bread setting.

As for chicken nuggets, Ian's makes gluten free chicken nuggets and fish sticks that taste just like the regular ones. You can get them at Whole Foods. I also make chicken nuggets with boneless, skinless chicken breasts, a little mayo & mustard mixed together, then gluten free bread crumbs with a little salt, parmesan cheese, and Italian Seasoning. I bake it for about 10 minutes and they're done. Everyone likes them. Glutino makes bagels, but I haven't tried them yet. Pamela's Products Ultimate Baking & Pancake mix is a lifesaver (as long as you can eat dairy.) It makes great pancakes and waffles, and they have some great recipes for quick breads, too (www.pamelasproducts.com). I've been making banana bread and pumpkin bread with it (I use a little more banana or pumpkin than they recommend, but follow it exactly otherwise) to try to get the kids to eat a little more fruit. Nobody can tell that these quick breads are gluten free. They're cornbread is great, too.

My son was diagnosed at 2, and he's now 3 1/2. We started telling him how he needs to eat gluten free or he'll get really sick after he was about 2 1/2. It was at this age when he stopped trying to eat everyone else's food without asking quite so much. We started watching cooking shows, talking about what looks good and what doesn't, what has gluten, and what would be easy for me to make gluten free. Now when he's out and about with all of his friends, even at an impromptu birthday party with cupcakes and no treats for him he still doesn't whine or try to eat what they have. He knows I have something really yummy waiting for him at home. He is absolutely great about it. Since all the kids do share food with each other, though, I always make sure to bring extra so he can share at least a little bit. I hand it to them (don't let them grab it so there's no accidental cross contamination issue) and inevitably they want what he's having more than what they have.

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I am also sensitive to eggs. It was recommended that I try duck eggs. I can eat them. They taste just like chicken eggs only stronger. I found them for $6.00 a dozen.

I also am dairy free. I have found I tolerate Goat and Buffolo yogurt and cheese just fine. The whole milk is used with both of these. The buffalo yogurt is very high fat content.

Susan :rolleyes:


Dairy/Cesain free Oct. 2005

Gluten free June 2006

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Another alternative to chicken nuggets is this simple recipie.

1lb of ground chicken

1 egg

mix well

then crumble up regular lays potato chips,

then just form a nugget shape and coat with the crumbled chips.

Bake on a cookie sheet at 400 for about 20 min, or untill golden brown.

They do end up tasting just like McDonalds!! easy and quick. They freeze well and can just be warmed up ion the microwave from frozen in about 40 sec. Hope this helps!


April L. In NY

w/ Hunter 4 DX by biopsy on his 3rd B-day 7-28-06

Douglas 6, Gluten Intolerant, Biopsy Neg.

Virginia 10, tested neg.

And the hubby.

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BREAKFAST

Green eggs and ham - just use green food coloring, kids love 'em

omelet w/ their favorite foods in it (I've even done cookie omelets w/ chicken bits and cookie bits)

Eggs and Oscar Meyer bacon

Gluten free muffins (Incredible Edible Gluten Free Food for Kids by Shari L. Sanderson - the best cookbook ever!)

LUNCH

Oscar Meyer hot dogs, no bun, you can cut them into half circles and arrange them into pictures on his plate, decorate with ketchup

Lunch meat roll ups - oscar meyer lunch meat, kraft american cheese, rolled up and stuck together with a dull plastic toothpick

Skewered Burger - on kabob skewers string hamburger pieces, cheese, tomato, lettuce, onion, etc...

Smiley Burgers - Cut smiley faces out of burgers or just make smiley faces w/ ketchup, serve w/ McCain smiles (fried mashed potato smiley faces)

Macaroni and Cheese made w/ Tinkyada pasta and Cheese Whiz (double check that label, I buy the Walmart brand and it's gluten free)

"Baked" beans and franks - 1 small can Bush's baked beans, 2 oscar meyer hot dogs cut into semi circles, 4 slices of bacon, brown sugar to taste - this will feed 2 or 3

SNACKS

Fresh fruit

Fresh veggies with Kraft ranch dressing to dip in

Pinwheels - sweet balogna wrapped up around Philadelphia cream cheese or ham wrapped up around pineapple cream cheese

"salad" - lettuce, cherry tomato, favorite nuts, apple pieces, cherries (pitted), with a marshmallow cream "dressing"

Gluten free crackers w/ Easy Cheese

Banana pictures - slice a banana and arrange it into pictures, decorate lightly with colored sugar and/or cinnamon

Gerber lil' crunchies zesty tomato flavor (YUM!!!)

DINNER

Spaghetti - Tinkyada spaghetti, Classico italian sausage sauce, Kraft parmesean cheese, serve with salad

Rice Casserole - White Rice, Chicken (cooked and cubed), Kraft cheddar cheese, brocolli (chopped) - mix cooked ingredients together and throw into oven to bake until cheese is melted

Rice Casserole 2 - 1 can stewed tomato, 1-2 cups precooked brown or white rice, Kraft precooked sausage (south beach diet), diced veggies of your choice (we like zucchini in it) - throw precooked ingredients into oven until bubbling and hot through

Steak, baked potato, and veggie (great to make on the grill)

Shish Kabobs (great marinade recipes on allrecipes.com - la choy soy sauce regular flavor is gluten free, check label)

Most dinner recipes are easy to convert to being gluten free without anybody noticing. Allrecipes.com is a great resource for recipies. I use it constantly. I just use gluten free ingredients instead of glutenous ones.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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We decided to make our house basically gluten free in December. As my 4 year old was diagnosed and my husband suspects he is Celiac as well. I keep a few whole grain things around for my 8 year old b/c I feel they are healthier (ie whole wheat bread w/ separate side of toaster oven) and granola bars with oats in them. But substitution is the name of the game. My daughter has done great.... and I believe this is why. We all know what to avoid. We always work hard to have comparable offerings for her. I keep snacks and treats in the car so if we are at an event and everyone is having cake, I can offer her cookies or something ok for her. We eat a lot of brown rice and Tinkyada pasta. She still has her hotdogs (I like natural ones anyway), we can even get pizza or chicken fingers if she wants them. I'm lucky, I have whole foods nearby, but most of what she eats is what she ate before without the bread or with gluten-free bread.

Favorites:

Banana slices with peanut butter (daily for breakfast)

gluten-free waffles with peanut butter or cream cheese

eggs over well with seasoning or ketchup

Lunchbox:

gluten-free Bologna or ham or turkey folded into squares

Peanut butter and jelly on gluten-free toast

Apples or clementines or grapes

cheese sticks or cheese slices

Birthday parties:

I call ahead and ask what they will be serving.... ex pizza and cake. I discuss with her that the other kids will have pizza and cake and ask what she wants to bring. We pack a lunch box with a few pizza slices (from night before, or just gluten-free roll sliced with sauce and cheese melted on top... toaster oven does this beautifully) and whatever treats we have around.... gluten-free cookies with frosting and sprinkles on top, pumpkin muffins we make often, a lara bar, or other treat.

Often if kids are having ice cream with their cake, she will say she just wants ice cream.

We all have bought into it and I am prepared when we go out. I call ahead and if a place can't accommodate us, we don't go. We talk a lot about how healthy and strong she is now that she doesn't eat gluten. She knows what ingredients to avoid better than my husband does. Now that it has been several months, she knows she is growing taller, has longer hair and stronger finger and toe nails than she did. She was never "really sick", we were lucky she was diagnosed on a hunch I had based on family history and her minimal symptoms. So a lot of her changes are subtle. We talk about the fact it's different than a nut allergy (kids at school have), and that she is lucky we caught it so young.

I don't consider it a burden or "too bad" she was diagnosed. I talk with her about how lucky she is to be diagnosed so young and that all she has to do to be healthy is eat the right foods. I think that goes a long way in her acceptance too.

Good luck.... It's a hard transition, but it's sooooo worth it.

Sarah

She loves salad bars (picks out ham squares, cheese squares, dried fruit, cucumbers and carrots.... voila dinner).


Sarah

Mom in Rhode Island with two girls ages 4.5 and 7.5.

4.5 yr old diagnosed w/ blood test 12/2006

Chiropractor diagnosed it before that.

Extensive family history of Celiac

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I have decided to take my entire house gluten free. I worry that the cc to my daughter is too great and also question whether my 3 year old might be gluten intolerant. My concern is how do change a 3 year old who is use to breads, pasta's ect. over to a gluten free lifestyle? Also, snack ideas would be great. This is going to be hard for him I suspect but want to make the transition as easy as possible.

Thank you

Sarah

My son is almost 4 and he has been gluten free for four months. We also just went gluten free as a household with the exception of oatmeal for my husband and myself in the morning. I was also worried about CC and my son was really starting to want to eat what we were eating. Having to say, I'm sorry honey it has gluten in it too many times did it.

My son could have been the poster child for bad eating - goldfish, crackers, crackers, crackers. We used to call him a "carbivore" because it seemed like he could live off of bread. I think we've found that since he is feeling much better he is now open to trying more foods. I could not believe he consented to eating a salad a month ago!! If it happened for him I have faith it can happen for your little one. I think if everyone is on board and eating healthier it will be easier.

I have not found very many crackers (as in only 2) that are decent. I will be trying to make some soon. I am making bread now though and I am very happy with the results. Investing in the flours and special ingredients is worth it. It is far better than any gluten-free bread in the store.

Snack ideas:

Fruit - Smoothies

veggies

corn chips (I buy Guerrero tostada rounds and break them up)

Toast

Popcorn

Lundberg Sea Salt chips

Tinkyada pasta

Also, having some special snacks on hand as replacements when going to friends' house or other places is a must, I feel. I don't ever want him to feel left out! Cooking ahead a freezing portions is a lifesaver.

I have to remember that snack time is a must for my son getting some fresh fruit or vegetables. If he is hungry he will eat it. He would go back to eating junk in a heartbeat. Like I said, if he can change, I have faith you can gradually get you little one there also.


Mom to Nathan (5) and Joshua (6 months).

Nathan diagnosed Celiac through positive dietary response and bloodwork.

In search of the best gluten free recipes. I get discouraged, then pick up the measuring cup again and try some more.

Praying Nathan has a good year in Kindergarten!

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Ya know what's funny? i'm the only one gluten free in my house, but my kids like the gluten free stuff better than I do! LOL :D

When I make Lorka Bread - they won't eat any bread but that until it's gone! LOL :D

I think if we HAD to go gluten free for them, we could.

Looks like you got a lot of great advice here. I hope transition goes well for you!

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What is Lorka bread?


Sarah 29 gluten-free for daughter since March 2007

Rebecca 12/21/06 apppears to be sensitive to all foods FFT

Robbie 1/12/07 cashew allergy, doing better off gluten

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