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Guest j_mommy

Rising Bread And Bread Products

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Guest j_mommy

Where does everyone put their bread and bread products to rise????

I can't seem to put things in a place warm enough to rise. I've tried on top of the pre-heated stove, on top of a running dryer....it rises just not much and to get it to rise the right amout it take twice as long as the recipe says to rise! HELP!!!!

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

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Where does everyone put their bread and bread products to rise????

I can't seem to put things in a place warm enough to rise. I've tried on top of the pre-heated stove, on top of a running dryer....it rises just not much and to get it to rise the right amout it take twice as long as the recipe says to rise! HELP!!!!

I put mine in the oven to rise. I heat it up just a little bit first.


Tapioca intolerant

First cousin dx'd with Celiac Disease

Grandmother died of malnutrition b/c everything made her sick... sounds like celiac to me.

Gluten-free since June 2005

Dx with IBS February 2005

Blood tests both negative (or inconclusive?) for celiac (in 2002 and 2004)

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My oven has a "warm" setting, so I turn it on warm while I make the bread, then when the bread is in the pan I turn the oven off and put the bread inside it to rise - always works perfect and rises in about 40 min.

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My oven has a "warm" setting, so I turn it on warm while I make the bread, then when the bread is in the pan I turn the oven off and put the bread inside it to rise - always works perfect and rises in about 40 min.

You may need to add a bit (up to tsp depending on size of loaf and other ingredients) of sugar. That should help it rise. You could also purchase some "dough enhancer" (from one of the online gluten-free stores) or use about 1 tsp of vinegar. Sometimes I use both.

Most recently I had a loaf rise WAY too much - it overflowed all over everything!

And then sunk when that happened. It rose AGAIN, and sunk AGAIN. What a mess!

i


Franceen

Diagnosed DH by Allergist via gluten-free Diet Success

Gluten-free since Dec 2005

Gluten-free works so why keep getting tests?

Neg skin biopsy & Neg bloodwork after gluten-free for 3 months

No Endoscopy - need to eat gluten for good test & won't do it

No other Allergies or major ailments!

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My oven has a "warm" setting, so I turn it on warm while I make the bread, then when the bread is in the pan I turn the oven off and put the bread inside it to rise - always works perfect and rises in about 40 min.

<BR>My oven has a "warm" setting, so I turn it on warm while I make the bread, then when the bread is in the pan I turn the oven off and put the bread inside it to rise - always works perfect and rises in about 40 min.<BR>[

You may need to add a bit (up to tsp depending on size of loaf and other ingredients) of sugar. That should help it rise. You could also purchase some "dough enhancer" (from one of the online gluten-free stores) or use about 1 tsp of vinegar. Sometimes I use both (sugar and dough enhancer/vinegar (not both enhancer and vinegar!).

Most recently I had a loaf rise WAY too much - it overflowed all over everything! And then sunk when that happened. It rose AGAIN, and sunk AGAIN. What a mess! I ended up with a rather compressed loaf with lots of air holes that has the texture of a cracker!!!


Franceen

Diagnosed DH by Allergist via gluten-free Diet Success

Gluten-free since Dec 2005

Gluten-free works so why keep getting tests?

Neg skin biopsy & Neg bloodwork after gluten-free for 3 months

No Endoscopy - need to eat gluten for good test & won't do it

No other Allergies or major ailments!

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I put mine in the oven too. I start heating it to 300 degrees or so while I'm mixing the ingredients. Then I turn off the oven and put it in with a cheese cloth over it. I've also put plastic wrap with a little bit of oil sprayed on it over the bread too. Both have worked well. I also always put a pan of hot water below the bread (on a rack below) to create a moist environment. I sometimes put it in the dishwasher to rise too if I am using the oven for something else.

I put mine in the oven to rise. I heat it up just a little bit first.

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Guest j_mommy

Thank you guys!!! I didn't know you could preheat then turn off the oven to let it rise!!! New to cooking and so far loving it except for these little setbacks!!!LOL

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Don't worry too much about the rising time specified in the recipe - go by how high the dough has risen, not the time. It could take more or less time on different days, depending on many environmental factors, but if you go for a consistent dough height, you will have more consistent results.


Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

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Where does everyone put their bread and bread products to rise????

I can't seem to put things in a place warm enough to rise. I've tried on top of the pre-heated stove, on top of a running dryer....it rises just not much and to get it to rise the right amout it take twice as long as the recipe says to rise! HELP!!!!

Hi,

I let my bread rise (prove) by wrapping it loosely in a lightweight plastic bag

and putting it on a window ledge in the sun for about 40 mins, then straight

into the pre-heated oven.

.

Try a space in your airing cupboard,

or in a small press with a reading lamp with halogen type bulb playing down on it.

.

During the warm weather place it outside loosely wrapped in a plastic bag.

.

The bag serves as a barrier against bugs and also it helps prove bread quicker

by retaining the heat and moisture generated by the action of the yeast or soda.

.

Best Regards,

David


Chronically Ill and lost 56lbs in 3 Months Prior to Diagnosis.

Diagnosed in Nov 2005 after Biopsy and Blood Tests

Cannot tolerate Codex Wheat Starch.

Self Taught Baker.

Bake everything from scratch using naturally gluten-free ingredients.

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