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lilypad23

Enterolab Results

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I finally got my Enterolab results, but I'm unsure of what to do now. I'm really happy that I have some concrete answers but I was wondering if anyone could answer a couple of questions. Based on these results, does anyone here think that I should show these to my doctor to see if I should see a G.I. specialist? Also, it says that I probably don't have celiac, but I do have gluten sensitivity with an autoimmune reaction. What is the difference exactly? Also, when you first get diagnosed are there certain diets that you should follow to heal or will I get better if I just cut out gluten, milk, and soy. I haven't had any gluten in about a month or more but I have had soy and milk. Are sodas ok to have or I should I cut those out for a while?

A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 78 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 74 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 588 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow

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Well, since you have been gluten-free for a month, seeing a G.I. specialist would probably be pretty useless. He would want to put you back on gluten to do a biopsy, which is not needed.

You can try showing these to your doctor, but I am not sure what good it would do. He/she might look at your genes and declare that with those you can't have celiac disease (which would be untrue), and that these results mean nothing, and give you a diagnosis of IBS. Of course, if you have a good doctor (and those are a rare breed), these results will be accepted and you might actually get an official diagnosis of gluten, dairy and soy intolerance. But of course, you know that already.

There is no real difference between celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. It's all in the minds of the medical establishment. Since the treatment is the same, it shouldn't matter.

Your fecal fat score shows that you have malabsorption issues. Which probably means that you have vitamin and mineral deficiencies as a result. It would be best if you would, on top of also cutting out soy and dairy, also eliminate all junk foods (including gluten-free ones) from your diet for a while, to give your body the best chance to get nourishment out of your food.

If you can get your doctor to test for deficiencies (ferritin, vitamin D, vitamins B12 and B6, calcium, magnesium, potassium, vitamin E) as well as do a bone densitiy scan to rule out osteoporosis (even children with celiac disease have been diagnosed with osteoporosis), that would be good. Then you will know what you need to supplement with.

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Yes, not having sodas would be good, as they are very unhealthy. On the other hand, if you want caffeine, you might just want to drink a cup of coffee or black tea instead (apparently, some doctors/scientists say that coffee is good for you, while others say it isn't.........you decide which is true for you by how your body likes it if you try). If you sweeten your drink with honey or maple syrup, it should be okay.

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I was thinking about trying the coffee and tea, but then I decided that I don't really need to have caffeine right now. Its probably not that great for you, so I'm going to get rid of caffeine completely. I'm kind of scared because withdrawal can be really bad, but I really want to start feeling completely better.

Ursa, I wanted to ask you though about lectins. I saw another post of yours about them. I've noticed since being on this diet that potatoes, tomatoes, and peanut butter seem to give me more problems than other food, but rice and corn don't give me any problems. The first two days I was on this diet all I ate was rice and mangos and I felt great. But then I started adding more stuff and I started getting sick again and since then its been like I'll feel better for a couple of days and then I'll just get sick out of nowhere. That's why I ended up getting the Enterolab tests done because I keep getting sick. Anyways, back to my original question, can you be allergic to only one type of lectin? Also, are they permanent like gluten intolerance?

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Caraline, yes you can be sensitive to some groups of lectins and not so sensitive to others, I can't have gluten, milk, eggs, legumes and nightshades but I can still have rice and corn. If you get a feeling that a food isn't sitting right you can cut it out for a while and try it again later, after a few repetitions of this you'll notice if there is a pattern.

Pauliina

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There is no real difference between celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. It's all in the minds of the medical establishment. Since the treatment is the same, it shouldn't matter.

True, of course, that the treatment is the same - but I can only wish the top statement were true.

Gluten sensitivity or intolerance wouldn't have spawned the number or severity of symptoms I once had.

Celiac can affect EVERY system of the body.

The 2nd list of "probables" has a number of conditions which I'd bet by now could be moved to the "definite" list. (These were published yrs ago)

Definite symptoms/complications

http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodi...-15104373588.a8

Probable symptoms/complications

http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodi...-15104373588.a8

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Gluten intolerance can & does result in as many or more symptoms as celiac - just ask us that have the DQ1 genes... & we do get villi atrophy despite what the doctors seem to think. we also get a lot of neurological problems and other food intolerances.

Most of my family is double DQ1 - & they have the IBS, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, seizures, obesity, failure to thrive, asthma, hives, rashes, shingles, loss of enamel on teeth, bad cavities, migraines, osteoporosis, depression, dyslexia, constipation, fatique, etc etc etc

celiac is only advanced stage gluten intolerance...

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Gluten intolerance can & does result in as many or more symptoms as celiac - just ask us that have the DQ1 genes... & we do get villi atrophy despite what the doctors seem to think. we also get a lot of neurological problems and other food intolerances.

Most of my family is double DQ1 - & they have the IBS, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, seizures, obesity, failure to thrive, asthma, hives, rashes, shingles, loss of enamel on teeth, bad cavities, migraines, osteoporosis, depression, dyslexia, constipation, fatique, etc etc etc

celiac is only advanced stage gluten intolerance...

I agree totally with this. I am diagnosed celiac but when we had by gene tests done we were very surprised that 'technically' I am 'only' gluten intolerant. I have severe neurological damage, gltuen induced arthritis (in remission gluten-free), had daily and nightly painful D, skin problems including DH, and damage to almost every system in my body. There is no difference in the level of damage between celiac, as shown by genes, and gluten intolerance.

In doing a bit of research I discovered that oddly enough my gene type is very rare amongst caucasians, (odd because I am one, as were both parents and I have two copies) it is most commonly found in Asiatic people who do not consume the large amounts of wheat we do. In those populations my gene is linked to a rare form of adult onset Type 1 diabetes, lymphoma and RA. Some researchers are considering it to be another 'celiac' gene as it has only one small difference from DQ8, but time will tell as the population that carry it start to consume more gluten foods they are seeing it present as celiac.

There is much we don't know about celiac, more is being learned every day. but the one thing I can say with confidence is that gluten intolerance is just as serious as true celiac, the systems impacted may differ a bit, I was mostly a neuro presentation for 20 years before GI symptoms hit but my life would have been so different if I had been diagnosed promptly instead of everyone assuming I was just a mental case with horrible balance and lots of skin problems.

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