Jump to content
  • Sign Up
Celiac.com Sponsor:


Celiac.com Sponsor:


Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

wildwood

Daughter Freshman In College

Recommended Posts

I'm a freshman in college right now too! I was diagnosed the fall of my junior year in high school, and I'm still having some difficulties adjusting, so I can't imagine how hard it must be for your daughter. Luckily, the dining services at my school have been pretty good about finding food for me. They can only do so much when preparing gluten-free meals though, so it does get kind of bland eating similar, plain meals every night. And I've definitely gotten sick a few times because of cross contamination or confusion about ingredients. I have some crackers, soup, instant rice, etc. in my room, although I try to avoid eating in my room as much as possible because then I feel like I'm missing out on the experience of eating with my friends in the dining halls. One thing that's really helped me is that I've met 3 other people with celiac disease in my dorm, and a few others around campus! I never knew anyone my age with celiac disease before now, and it's great having the support (it also makes it easier to approach dinning services when there are so many of us). I don't know if I'm just lucky that I happened to find these other people or what, but especially now that celiac diseased is becoming more and more common, it's likely that there are some in your daughter's dorm as well. Tell her to keep an eye out for people who look wary around the salad bar, or who bring their own cereal boxes to breakfast, etc. It's amazing having someone to bond with over this, and for your daughter especially, meeting people who have had celiac disease for a while would be really helpful. Also, packages with gluten free baked goods always cheer me up. I hope it's starting to get a little easier for her! I know (as we all do) how frustrating it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm a freshman in college right now too! I was diagnosed the fall of my junior year in high school, and I'm still having some difficulties adjusting, so I can't imagine how hard it must be for your daughter. Luckily, the dining services at my school have been pretty good about finding food for me. They can only do so much when preparing gluten-free meals though, so it does get kind of bland eating similar, plain meals every night. And I've definitely gotten sick a few times because of cross contamination or confusion about ingredients. I have some crackers, soup, instant rice, etc. in my room, although I try to avoid eating in my room as much as possible because then I feel like I'm missing out on the experience of eating with my friends in the dining halls. One thing that's really helped me is that I've met 3 other people with celiac disease in my dorm, and a few others around campus! I never knew anyone my age with celiac disease before now, and it's great having the support (it also makes it easier to approach dinning services when there are so many of us). I don't know if I'm just lucky that I happened to find these other people or what, but especially now that celiac diseased is becoming more and more common, it's likely that there are some in your daughter's dorm as well. Tell her to keep an eye out for people who look wary around the salad bar, or who bring their own cereal boxes to breakfast, etc. It's amazing having someone to bond with over this, and for your daughter especially, meeting people who have had celiac disease for a while would be really helpful. Also, packages with gluten free baked goods always cheer me up. I hope it's starting to get a little easier for her! I know (as we all do) how frustrating it is.

I am so glad things are going well for you in college. I can imagine how great it must be to have met others with celiac disease. I am sure the support is invaluable. My daughter said she met two people in her dorm that have celiac disease. Unfortunately they are both in denial and refusing to eat gluten free. I know everyone goes through different stages and perhaps they will reach acceptance sometime soon. I hope so. My daughter has made some nice friends that do not need to follow a gluten free diet, but they have been wonderful about watching out for her and when they go out to buy snacks they all read the labels to make sure they are okay for her to eat. Now that is what I call friendship! I wish you the best. Thank you for your post. It is really nice to hear from someone in the same boat as she is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am relatively new to this myself. I am a junior in college, but I was just diagnosed this summer. As funny as it sounds, there was never a better time! This is the first year the school started offering gluten-free students options about where they can eat (granted, it is one consistent place). I really prepared myself before I came to school to understand what I can and cannot eat. Also, it helps that they make special meals. But, about your question - I love chocolate, and a lot of chocolate is gluten-free! Your daughter might have different preferences. Also, for my birthday, I got a gluten-free cheesecake. It was really good! Another good gluten-free treat would be gluten-free macaroons. I have had several brands and all have been very, very good. I had gluten-free bread once, and I vowed never to do so again. The school had a picnic at the beginning of the year and gave me bread for my sandwich. It was the most disgusting thing ever. Also, there are no exclusive gluten-free toasters, so I had to have my bread hard as rock and it tasted very, very funny. My tastebuds have changed, thanks to this diet. Most of the food is usually bland and repetitive - chicken nightly from the college, with some vegetables and either rice or gluten-free pasta - but I like it anyway . Again, for a care package, I'm sure she would appreciate anything! I LOVE packages, and anytime I've gotten one in my couple of years here, regardless of what it has been, I've gotten ecstatic. I like gluten-free wafers and macaroons. I am not a fan of other cookies or cake; they taste funny.

I hope this is helpful!

Sidenote: I know one senior who is also gluten-free, because we both were at an event at which we were being offered baked goods and could not have any. Aside from that, I recognize the other Celiacs, just because they eat at the dining hall at which I eat, but I am not really friends with any of them. My support group is my immediate group of friends, even though none of them really understand. :)

Gluten-free got a lot easier! It's worthwhile now; I get no cravings for gluten-food anymore. Through trial and error, I learned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We went through the same thing last year at Penn St. A few things we did that made it easier: ask them if they have room in the dining hall to store some extra food - this way you can send more at one time & she won't have a problem with storing the stuff. Also, see if they would let you keep a toaster (maybe they would even purchase it for you) there. That way she could have some for breakfast (that seems to be the hardest meal to find things to eat). My daughter also got another refrigerator in the room - she switched to a single room - felt having the extra space for food was worth it. She ended up doing a lot of chinese take-out too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can't get her a designated toaster, you could buy her Toast-A-Bags. They are reusable bags you can use in any toaster to prevent cross-contamination. I LOVE LOVE LOVE mine. I can even put a whole sandwich in one and use the toaster to make a panini. It melts the cheese and toasts the bread perfectly! The bags are easy to clean and, like I said earlier, are reusable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am in college too, and I just found out last week that I have celiac. One thing that's been really helpful to me is one of those apple cutters....it has the sections on it and then the middle part that takes out the core. My mom bought me one when she was here last time (before the celiac came about) and I used it about 2 times....now with the celiac I use it everyday!! It's so easy to slice an apple, then throw it in a baggie and eat it while in class/work/on my way to class/in the library...anywhere. It's really really helpful!! She could even dip it in peanut butter if she's craving something extra. Another thing that I have in my cupboard incase I get invited to a friends for a movie or something is those little bags of small size rice cakes. They have them in tons of flavors and different brands if she has a problem with Quaker....and they are really reasonable priced too! I just checked the ingredients very carefully and chose flavors that were gluten free. Microwave popcorn is great while studying. My mom makes this fantastic homemade salsa that I eat all the the time with corn tortilla chips. (Tostito's All Natural ones are the best....the sea salt on them really makes the chip! lol!) If I think of any other tips, I will let you know :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am in college too, and I just found out last week that I have celiac. One thing that's been really helpful to me is one of those apple cutters....it has the sections on it and then the middle part that takes out the core. My mom bought me one when she was here last time (before the celiac came about) and I used it about 2 times....now with the celiac I use it everyday!! It's so easy to slice an apple, then throw it in a baggie and eat it while in class/work/on my way to class/in the library...anywhere. It's really really helpful!! She could even dip it in peanut butter if she's craving something extra. Another thing that I have in my cupboard incase I get invited to a friends for a movie or something is those little bags of small size rice cakes. They have them in tons of flavors and different brands if she has a problem with Quaker....and they are really reasonable priced too! I just checked the ingredients very carefully and chose flavors that were gluten free. Microwave popcorn is great while studying. My mom makes this fantastic homemade salsa that I eat all the the time with corn tortilla chips. (Tostito's All Natural ones are the best....the sea salt on them really makes the chip! lol!) If I think of any other tips, I will let you know :)

You have a wonderful attitude for someone who is newly diagnosed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a really nice thing to say, THANK YOU!!! I try to keep a positive attitude...It's so hard though because I feel like no one understands sometimes! I'm the only person my age (I'm 22) who I know has this...all my friends are like "wow, that sucks, how can you live without bread??" or something like that. My boyfriend is great, learning to read labels with me and attending my nutrition class. Sometimes I think I'd go a little nutty if it wasn't for him :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am in college too, and I just found out last week that I have celiac. One thing that's been really helpful to me is one of those apple cutters....it has the sections on it and then the middle part that takes out the core. My mom bought me one when she was here last time (before the celiac came about) and I used it about 2 times....now with the celiac I use it everyday!! It's so easy to slice an apple, then throw it in a baggie and eat it while in class/work/on my way to class/in the library...anywhere. It's really really helpful!! She could even dip it in peanut butter if she's craving something extra. Another thing that I have in my cupboard incase I get invited to a friends for a movie or something is those little bags of small size rice cakes. They have them in tons of flavors and different brands if she has a problem with Quaker....and they are really reasonable priced too! I just checked the ingredients very carefully and chose flavors that were gluten free. Microwave popcorn is great while studying. My mom makes this fantastic homemade salsa that I eat all the the time with corn tortilla chips. (Tostito's All Natural ones are the best....the sea salt on them really makes the chip! lol!) If I think of any other tips, I will let you know :)

I would appreciate any tips you come up with. I have a couple of ideas for you that my daughter has come up with. Rice Chex are a mainstream cereal that is gluten free so you can get them at most any grocery store. I actually went to a Super Walmart for the first time this weekend and they were $1.66 a box! She puts those in baggies to carry around with her in case she needs a nibble between classes. She has grown to enjoy them. She also has found that sticking to foods that have very little processing has worked pretty well for her. I will have to let her know about dipping apples in peanut butter. She loves peanut butter. I know when she needs a quick snack she just takes a spoonful or two and eats it that way. I am not sure she ever thought to use it on her apples. She loves apples!! She also has found a brand of corn tortillas that she likes. She puts sandwich fillings on them and rolls them up. They are quick, easy and portable. When home she used one to make a little pizza in the toaster oven. The corn tortillas are diffferent than what she was used to, but as with most other things she is acquiring new tastes for different foods and finding she actually likes some of the new alternatives better. She never used to eat nuts, but now finds she really enjoys pecans. It sounds as though you have a great handle on all of the ins and outs you will encounter and I am sure you are well on your way to feeling fantastic!! I wish you the best of luck on your journey!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't started my nutrtion classes yet but I will let you know of some of the foods they recommend once I do start! I feel the same way about the corn tortillas--icky compaired to what I am used to! (flour tortillas are so much softer) but they are ok. My friend told me to try lunch meat and flavored cream cheese (like onion or chive) rolled up in them and that's pretty good too. Something quick that I made last night for a movie snack was refried beans, sour cream and shredded cheese layered on a plate and then microwaved for a minute or two to melt the cheese. My grandma suggested it and I thought the sour cream would be gross in the micro but it was really good with chips. Your daughter is so lucky to have you so involved and ready to help her with this! I'm sure it really makes a difference, and it's good to feel support.

I was so excited....I went to a hockey game this weekend and I found that the hot cocoa, nachos and cheese, and some candy bars were gluten free! In case I ever wanted a snack there :) We can use our student meal plans to buy snacks at the games too.....really convienient!!! Some of my friends bought the food and I was checking their labels! ha-ha :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I haven't started my nutrtion classes yet but I will let you know of some of the foods they recommend once I do start! I feel the same way about the corn tortillas--icky compaired to what I am used to! (flour tortillas are so much softer) but they are ok. My friend told me to try lunch meat and flavored cream cheese (like onion or chive) rolled up in them and that's pretty good too. Something quick that I made last night for a movie snack was refried beans, sour cream and shredded cheese layered on a plate and then microwaved for a minute or two to melt the cheese. My grandma suggested it and I thought the sour cream would be gross in the micro but it was really good with chips. Your daughter is so lucky to have you so involved and ready to help her with this! I'm sure it really makes a difference, and it's good to feel support.

I was so excited....I went to a hockey game this weekend and I found that the hot cocoa, nachos and cheese, and some candy bars were gluten free! In case I ever wanted a snack there :) We can use our student meal plans to buy snacks at the games too.....really convienient!!! Some of my friends bought the food and I was checking their labels! ha-ha :)

Be careful of the nacho cheese that comes in a can, check the label.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter has a TV/ movie night with her friends and they like this layered dip with corn chips.

Layer a can of gluten-free chili, there are lots of those at any grocery. Layer first a brick of cream cheese then the chili then your favorite cheese. Micro till warmed then if you like cold toppings, add those. Maybe chopped onions, lettuce, tomatoes or salsa. Good stuff!

THe rollups we just do with cream cheese, flavored or plain and lunchmeat, pop in a plastic bag and you have a snack on the go!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About the nacho cheese....the one they have at our stadium's concessions comes in individual little containers (like smaller yogurt or pudding containers) that is SEALED (no cross contamination) and has the ingredients and "gluten free" typed on the outside......pretty handy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
About the nacho cheese....the one they have at our stadium's concessions comes in individual little containers (like smaller yogurt or pudding containers) that is SEALED (no cross contamination) and has the ingredients and "gluten free" typed on the outside......pretty handy!

WOW, that's great! Perfect! I will watch for those everywhere for my dd. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for your reply. These are good ideas. She just called me to say she ate some soup and was so sick this afternoon her professor excused her from class. I told her you idea for the individual packets of soy sauce and she liked that idea very much. I will look into some gluten-free canned soups for her also. I feel she is starting to get discouraged. I am glad I am going to see her next weekend. I have been gathering alot of ideas for her and I can try and reinforce to her where gluten may be hiding. I know she will find her way, but I am hoping she does not let it get her down. I try to keep things as upbeat as possible and to let her know she will get the hang of it. She will just be learning alot along the way. I will also be discussing with her your suggestion of a meeting with the dining facility. I really don't think she would be happy leaving the dorm because that is where all the freshman reside. If I were able to get her into a suite she would be with upper classman. She may be okay with that idea. It is another option I will offer her although I suspect for now she will want to stay put because she has made some nice friends where she is. Thanks again for your suggestions :)

I am newly diganosed, too, and I know how your daughter feels. It IS frustrating being reminded constantly of what you can't eat, and it is hard to get the hang of it. I can imagine that it would be extra hard in college...how is she handling it? Doing okay?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the worst time in the dorms... but I was not officially diagnosed and didn't have a doctor's note to use yet (it was about 2 months before I moved out of the dorms, so at least it was short!), and our food services weren't that helpful even to the diagnosed celiacs I knew. They'd mark up a menu and highlight the "safe" foods, which were very repetitive, bland, and sparse. They didn't make individual servings for anyone, our food was their food, so everyone was constantly sick from cross contamination. I recall living off of Amy's frozen meals and this Indian restaurant across the street, and the gluten-free soups at the hot bar at Whole Foods. Even when I just got salad, I got sick in the dining halls.

Whole Foods really was a life saver. They do have some gluten-free foods (including some of their sushi) and their staff was really helpful when I couldn't figure out if I could have something or not. It got frustrating after a while, but it was a good solution when all else fails. My bf still drags me there for lunch when we can't figure out where else to eat, haha. If she has a whole foods near her, suggest that she go to their customer service desk and pick up one of their gluten-free shopping guides. It basically lists all kinds of products that are gluten-free. They also do gluten-free tours once and a while, where they point out all the gluten-free stuff in the store. I've never been on one but it might be a good suggestion so that she can start to identify more easy to eat/make foods.

Also, I know they're not supposed to have toasters, but I could not LIVE without mine. I snuck mine into the dorm and then used it semi-illegally in my sorority house last year as well. For the most part, RAs won't check for that kind of junk. If they check for anything, it's booze and drugs, and usually it's provoked. So if she keeps it out of sight and hidden, even if the RA comes in to say "hi" or something, if its isn't noticed, she won't get in trouble. gluten-free breads are for the most part, horrible without toasting. She could make all kinds of sandwiches (even "grilled" cheese!) and toast and whatever else if she had a good way to heat them up. I simply kept mine in a cardboard box when it wasn't in use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I had the worst time in the dorms... but I was not officially diagnosed and didn't have a doctor's note to use yet (it was about 2 months before I moved out of the dorms, so at least it was short!), and our food services weren't that helpful even to the diagnosed celiacs I knew. They'd mark up a menu and highlight the "safe" foods, which were very repetitive, bland, and sparse. They didn't make individual servings for anyone, our food was their food, so everyone was constantly sick from cross contamination. I recall living off of Amy's frozen meals and this Indian restaurant across the street, and the gluten-free soups at the hot bar at Whole Foods. Even when I just got salad, I got sick in the dining halls.

Whole Foods really was a life saver. They do have some gluten-free foods (including some of their sushi) and their staff was really helpful when I couldn't figure out if I could have something or not. It got frustrating after a while, but it was a good solution when all else fails. My bf still drags me there for lunch when we can't figure out where else to eat, haha. If she has a whole foods near her, suggest that she go to their customer service desk and pick up one of their gluten-free shopping guides. It basically lists all kinds of products that are gluten-free. They also do gluten-free tours once and a while, where they point out all the gluten-free stuff in the store. I've never been on one but it might be a good suggestion so that she can start to identify more easy to eat/make foods.

Also, I know they're not supposed to have toasters, but I could not LIVE without mine. I snuck mine into the dorm and then used it semi-illegally in my sorority house last year as well. For the most part, RAs won't check for that kind of junk. If they check for anything, it's booze and drugs, and usually it's provoked. So if she keeps it out of sight and hidden, even if the RA comes in to say "hi" or something, if its isn't noticed, she won't get in trouble. gluten-free breads are for the most part, horrible without toasting. She could make all kinds of sandwiches (even "grilled" cheese!) and toast and whatever else if she had a good way to heat them up. I simply kept mine in a cardboard box when it wasn't in use.

Thanks for the advice. My daughter was able to get released from her housing contract, but could not find a suitable apartment that is available. Now it is almost the end of the semester and she is thinking she can manage one more. She will move into her own place for the fall semester. She has some roomates lined up already. The school did offer her a suite with a kitchen, but she would have to move in with upper classman she does not know. She felt it would be too awkward for her to move into a living situation where the others are already established and then trying to establish kitchen rules on top of it. I can understand where she is coming from.

She has come up with quite a few coping methods and finds she is not getting glutened as often. I am going to ask her what she thinks about the toaster. That would be great for her. Thanks again for your tips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I never developed DH. I did have some neuopathy in my fingers, but it went away. I would still think about getting a bone density test for your daughter. My vitamin levels and all other tests are normal and I only found out about the bone loss by accident. The annoying thing was, after I was diagnosed I saw my childhood doctor for the first time in years and he pulled out an X ray from when I got into a car accident at 19. He said: you know, this shows your bones were underdeveloped even back then. I thought, wow that would have been great to know 8 years ago!

Your daughter is lucky to have a mom to help her. Those of us who find out when we are older end up on our own!

Best wishes to you both.

I want to thank you for advising a bone density test. At your suggestion, my daughter had this done last week and the result shows she has some mild osteopenia. Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Celiac.com Sponsor:

  • Forum Discussions

    CB, sorry to hear you're still having problems.  Deficiency of Vitamin B12 can cause diarrhea.  It's a frequently overlooked symptom.  Did you discuss with your doctor what to do about the B12 deficiency? Shots or oral supplements?  ...
    I think you should consider getting tested for celiac disease in order to help rule out gluten ataxia.  Why?  I just had anemia.  No GI issues with gluten.  I never would have guessed that I had celiac disease.  
    My mom has Graves.  I much prefer Hashimoto’s!  I had a few thyroid swings and it is easier to be hypo than hyper.  My Mom has permanent eye damage as a result.  If you have Graves, get treatment which may include surgery.  Her ferritin levels a...
×
×
  • Create New...