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mkmom

One Half Of A Celiac Gene

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Hi everyone. I am new here but not so new to the celiac issue. My 11 yr old son was dx'd with PDD-NOS (autisum spec) in 04. Through detox and treatment for that we had genetic testing done (in 06). I've lost the test results but it was done by Prometheus and said he had one half of the celiac gene and they could not rule it out or in.

I've read on this site that you can have one gene and still have celiac. Do you think when they said one half gene that they meant one of the two that definately causes celiac??

I am beginning to think that all MY troubles are celiac and am going to pursue a dx for me. That is why all this is coming up again.

I have RA, hypo thyroidism, and have had bowel issues for years. My mother did too. She was lactose intollerant and I probably am to a lesser degree.

Any info you can give me would help. My son was dx'd with Type 1 Diabetes in Jan 08. I have him mostly gluten free, fearful that he will develope celiac. He doesn't seem to have many symptoms but I did notice he had mouth sores (inside, canker?) after eating Carl's Jr. crisscut fries two days in a row.

Thanks for your help.

MKmom

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I am guessing it is the gene called DQ7. Genes have an alpha and a beta part. The DQ7 shares one of these parts (can't remember which) with the DQ2, which is the gene commonly associated with celiac. The DQ7 was found in something like 2% of European celiacs in one study (with DQ2 and DQ8 being absent.) I have the DQ7 (no 2 or 8) and I have been diagnosed with the disease.

Some people here feel that the genes don't really help you very much in diagnosing the disease, because the relationship between the genes and the illness is not completely understood and there are other factors that come into play.

Your best bet is to try eliminating gluten to see what that does. If it helps, then you have an answer.

Good luck!

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I am guessing it is the gene called DQ7. Genes have an alpha and a beta part. The DQ7 shares one of these parts (can't remember which) with the DQ2, which is the gene commonly associated with celiac. The DQ7 was found in something like 2% of European celiacs in one study (with DQ2 and DQ8 being absent.) I have the DQ7 (no 2 or 8) and I have been diagnosed with the disease.

Some people here feel that the genes don't really help you very much in diagnosing the disease, because the relationship between the genes and the illness is not completely understood and there are other factors that come into play.

Your best bet is to try eliminating gluten to see what that does. If it helps, then you have an answer.

Good luck!

Lisa: Thank you for the quick reply. I am going to request another copy of his test from the doctor. I have read, and believe it would help me, that actually knowing that you have the disease (in this case the gene) helps people stay on the diet. I read the latest issue of Living Without with Elizabeth Hasselbeck where she says this was the case with her. I did go gluten free for 3 months (Jan, Feb & Mar) and didn't have all the bloating that I have now. I don't seem to get stomach aches, just bloating, gas and bowel issues (constipation has troubled me since I was a kid).

I think I'll just go gluten-free and see how I feel (going to keep a food journal). I have been tested for food allergies and am "allergic" (immune reaction ) to eggs, dairy, sugars and sesame. I had eliminated all of those while on my diet in January and felt better.

Thanks for your help.

MKmom

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IMO, it's helpful to know exactly what your genes are. Lisa16 is right about DQ7.5. The alpha portion of that gene (*0505) is very similar to the alpha gene of DQ2.5 (*0501), which is the gene most likely to be involved in celiac disease. Even if you don't have DQ2 or DQ8 it still puts you at risk... although the risk is smaller. BUT... here's what I think is important to know. DQ7 is also associated with casein intolerance (and I know a lot of people swear by the Gluten-free Casein-free diet as a treatment for autism), thyroid disorders, allergies to grass and pollen (allergic rhinitis), and lupus. That doesn't mean that someone with DQ7 is guaranteed to get any of those disorders... they're just something to be on the lookout for. It might explain why your family has a history of problems with dairy.

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