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Dedicated Breadmaker

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I have been gluten free for 6 weeks (yay me!), and have done very well with this. I am a good in the kitchen so adapting for me hasn't been too big of a deal. The issue is that I have not switched my family to a gluten-free diet, for several reasons, the primary reason being cost etc. I purchased a new breadmaker for making my breads, which I am having some success with. Last week I decided that I would make some french bread for my family in my new bread maker, as the old one is a vertical loaf and doesn't perform as well as the new one. I cleaned the pan carefully, and wiped out the unit so no crumbs etc were in it, then made my bread. I had a reaction to something, but it could have been another item (ie. Kraft Light mayo, or honey baked ham). My question is this, can I use my breadmaker to bake regular bread and make dough AND use it for gluten-free bread? I just can't afford to have a completely gluten free home for my family of 6!

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I have been gluten free for 6 weeks (yay me!), and have done very well with this. I am a good in the kitchen so adapting for me hasn't been too big of a deal. The issue is that I have not switched my family to a gluten-free diet, for several reasons, the primary reason being cost etc. I purchased a new breadmaker for making my breads, which I am having some success with. Last week I decided that I would make some french bread for my family in my new bread maker, as the old one is a vertical loaf and doesn't perform as well as the new one. I cleaned the pan carefully, and wiped out the unit so no crumbs etc were in it, then made my bread. I had a reaction to something, but it could have been another item (ie. Kraft Light mayo, or honey baked ham). My question is this, can I use my breadmaker to bake regular bread and make dough AND use it for gluten-free bread? I just can't afford to have a completely gluten free home for my family of 6!

This is probably not what you want to hear, but I think you just sacrificed your bread maker to the gluten gods. I looked at mine and realized there was no possible way I could clean it completely of every spec of gluten. There are just too many nooks and crannies. And if you're as sensitive as many of us are, just a spec will nail you. Your reaction was probably to your bread maker. Unless yours comes apart more than mine, I think you may have just lost your appliance to the glutenators in the family.

Bummer. :( :( :(

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Bummer. :( :( :(

I gave my old breadman bread machine away and I bought a new one.

I also had old flour as well and that went to the person to whom I gave the old, beloved machine.

I knew that I couldn't get the old wheat and rye flour out of it and I just bit the bullet and purchased a new one,

which I love!!

But yeah, bummer.

You are probably going to have to get a new machine.

But can you perhaps do this.

Are you a natural born baker?

If so, can you dedicate a couple of loaf pans to the gluten free gods and go your gluten-free baking by hand.

I mean you don't need to do a second rise so it might be the best thing for you?

Then you can keep the bread machine you already own for the wheat and rye concoctions.

~Allison

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BIG BUMMER! :(:(:(

waaahhhh, that makes me sad. But I think you might be right AlysounRI, I do like to bake, and I am finding the gluten-free bread is easier than that nasty wheat based bread to produce a loaf quickly and without the second rise. Man talk about blowing it, I spared no expense on this machine. Good thing I convinced my hubby that I REALLY needed a new stand mixer as well! Fortunately my family loves the very easy french bread that I produce out of the machine, which actually makes me sick to think about eating!

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BIG BUMMER! :(:(:(

Fortunately my family loves the very easy french bread that I produce out of the machine, which actually makes me sick to think about eating!

Well, then make a lot of that - it will make them happy and get some dedicated loaf pans for yourself and do it without the machine. If you are a natural born baker, revel in it. Your new machine won't go to waste on your family's liking for your creations.

I like to bake but the minute yeast becomes involved, things just seem to go wrong for me, so I need a machine.

Make sure, also, that you have some dedicated gluten-free utensils to use with those gluten-free baking pans.

You'll be fine.

Also please share the recipes for what you make.

And happy baking to you!

~Allison

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