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Megs613

Enterolab Help

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I just had this done for my son and myself and these were our results.

My son 2 1/2 years old, chronic loose stools about his only symptom. Getting much better since gluten free, but is now complaining of a tummy ache a lot, not sure if I should put him on prevacid or something to help??

A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 34 Units

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 11 Units

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Less than 300 Units

Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA: 4 Units

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0201

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0301

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score (Normal Range is less than 300 Units): Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: HLA-DQB1 gene analysis reveals that you have one of the main genes that predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302. Each of your offspring has a 50% chance of receiving this gene from you, and at least one of your parents passed it to you. You also have a non-celiac gene predisposing to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302). Having one celiac gene and one gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of a gluten sensitive gene. Having two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac disease may be more severe.

and myself:

A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 13 Units

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 4 Units

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Less than 300 Units

Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA: 8 Units

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0201

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0602

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,6)

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): The level of intestinal IgA antibodies to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase was below the upper limit of normal, and hence, there is no evidence of a gluten-induced autoimmune reaction.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score (Normal Range is less than 300 Units): Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: HLA-DQB1 gene analysis reveals that you have one of the main genes that predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302. Each of your offspring has a 50% chance of receiving this gene from you, and at least one of your parents passed it to you. You also have a non-celiac gene predisposing to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302). Having one celiac gene and one gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of a gluten sensitive gene. Having two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac disease may be more severe.

My question with my results is since I am not having an immunlogical response do I really need to be strictly gluten free?? My son has been having symptoms for a year, me only 5 months. Would mine eventually get that high?? I am finding it really hard to follow this diet and my symptoms are better, but not night and day like my son.

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Hi, and welcome, Megs613! I am pretty much in the same boat as you, except both of my genes are for gluten sensitivity. From reading the FAQ's on the Enterolab website, ANY elevated result means that your body IS reacting to gluten. They liken it to a pregnancy test - either you are pregnant or you aren't.

I have to think through this myself because of my resutls. Mine was 14 and I just got my son's result, which is 11.

Two things: I think that your gene test results add extra weight for the skeptic in you. Celiac gene AND elevated antibodies...

Secondly, which I have to tell myself, is that I can be thankful that we caught this BEFORE it got bad. Why do I occasionally wish for a higher number just to quell the doubting I feel? Positive is positive.

Actually, one more thing to remember, is that some people don't produce as much IgA as they should, which could result in a lower number.

Hang in there and know you aren't alone! This board is great for support and encouragement!

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Thanks for your input. I was reading that too, and I know positive is positive from what I read. I guess it's the skeptic in me saying is this really this. I had some diarrhea which has improved, but my main symptom was nausea. It got a lot better since going gluten free, but not gone completely. Sometimes I wonder if I have something else autoimmune going on, I know that often goes hand and hand with gluten sensitivity.

I am very happy I caught it early, who is to say if it wouldn't turn into full celiacs, but sometimes I wish I had a SUPER positive answer. I know though, well I think anyway, can't gluten intolerance cause some of the same symptoms as celiacs, I mean serious. I had a stroke 4 months after having my daughter, got a clean slate of health besides the stroke. Never could figure anything out, the nausea started bad a month before that, seems to me maybe there is a connection??

Thanks this site is full of wonderful info!

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I know though, well I think anyway, can't gluten intolerance cause some of the same symptoms as celiacs, I mean serious.

From what I have read on here, yes, gluten sensitivity can cause symptoms just as serious as celiac. I have read some stories of people in serious condition and they don't actually have the common "celiac gene." So, and I'm talking to myself, too, we should take this seriously as to prevent worse from happening.

Wow about your stroke! What did the docs say about the cause?

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Your case sounds very similar to my two adult daughters, both of whom have been biopsy diagnosed as having celiac disease, and both of whom had it "triggered" by their first pregnancy (not uncommon).

Nother my wife nor I, nor our parents (as far as we know) had celiac symptoms, and I am very intrigued as to where it came from in our family. Out of curiosity, I sent my speciment to Dr. Fine at Enterolab---the results were similar to your own---go gluten free, retest in a year, blah, blah. Again, out of curiosity, I did go gluten free for 14 months, and saw NO CHANGES WHATSOEVER. I was retested, and received the same old message from Dr. Fine. I replied that I had been gluten free for 14 months, I saw no changes, and asked him what I had learned or accomplished. He implied that I had inadvertantly been eating gluten. NOT SO!

I have read ever book worth reading on the subject, I follow two celiac message boards regularly, I attended a 3-day seminar on the disease at the National Institute for Health, have attended local support group meetings, subscribe to two gluten-free magazines, and I have met and talked to Dr. Fine and Dr. Fasano, two medical experts on the subject. In summary, I know a little about the subject.

I concluded that eating gluten-free is not really difficult, unless two things are involved ---children and eating out. In you case, your child is young enough that you can completely control his/her diet, and I suggest you not eat out until you become well versed on the subject. You say you are having difficulty with the diet. I suggest you start by eating meat, vegetables, and potatoes---the good old American staple meal. Add a salad, and instead of wreat, eat rice cakes, corn cakes, or chebe (familiar with it?). Add the following whenever you want: dairy products of all kinds. Also, eat all the fruit you want. For dessert, eat jello, tapioca, ice cream, or sherbert. For snacks, eat popcorn, nuts, sunflower seeds, etc. For sweets, eat sugar candy and even chocolate (but watch the candy mixtures with wheat in them).

At the same time, start learning about celiac diets and how to make them easy. Learn how to ask questions, find gluten-free recipes, read labels, etc. The best way to do this is threefold (a) follow this message board, and also the one (which is even better in some ways) at www.delphiforums.com., (B) subscribe to the following magazines: LIVING WITHOUT and GLUTEN FREE LIVING (find questions, articles, ads, information, etc.), and © buy and read these two books: CELIAC DISEASE: A HIDDEN EPIDEMIC by Peter Green, and HEALTHIER WITHOUT WHEAT by Stephen Wangen.

I know you, along with many others, want answers---why me, how serious is this, can I eat just a little gluten, what about eating out, where are gluten-free foods, where are gluten-free recipes, what do my tests prove, what are all of the symptoms of celiqc, is this/that related to my celiac problem, what is the long term diagnosis, etc., etc. You want PRECISE answers, but unfortunately, often they do not exist. Take the three steps above I suggest, and in two months you will be an expert on the disease, and you will also be feeling comfortable about you and your daughter, and your lifestyle changes. Yes, you are in for a change in lifestyle, but it is quite easy once you get the hang of it, and you will find and meet (online and in person) many people with whom you can relate and make lifelong friends. Good luck to you. Warme regards.

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You both were gluten free at the time of testing?

Son has elevated fecal ttg numbers, you have only a 4.

But both have the main celiac gene.

Son additionally has the DQ4 gene, and usually the alpha chain in DQ7 is 05*, which is the main predisposing factor in DQ2, so he has more than DQ2.

You have Dq2 and DQ6, and DQ6 means DQ1 and that is connected to neurological symptoms from gluten. You might do yourself some neurological damage if you eat gluten , i addition to the gut issues from having DQ2.

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You both were gluten free at the time of testing?

Son has elevated fecal ttg numbers, you have only a 4.

But both have the main celiac gene.

Son additionally has the DQ4 gene, and usually the alpha chain in DQ7 is 05*, which is the main predisposing factor in DQ2, so he has more than DQ2.

You have Dq2 and DQ6, and DQ6 means DQ1 and that is connected to neurological symptoms from gluten. You might do yourself some neurological damage if you eat gluten , i addition to the gut issues from having DQ2.

I was off gluten, but son was not. Does that really make a difference though??

So you are saying my son has a higher chance of actually having celiac if he already doesn't?? When you say he has more then DQ2?? His blood test was negative though. He has slowed down growing in the past year, but not losing weight. I am unsure if I should do a scope or not. We have him stictly of gluten though. I have an appointment with our GP tomorrow, not sure what he will think of the results though.

For myself, so I have a less chance of actual Celiac then my son?? My tests didn't indicate Celiac like my sons did. I started having nausea in October and in Nov. had a stroke and doctors did TONS of tests and found nothing. I've always thought it could be linked to gluten, but I don't know. I am having a hard time convincing myself this is really the problem. Seems like everyone thinks well you don't have Celiacs so you will be fine....I try to think back to how terribly nauseous I was before I cut out gluten though, but I still get it here and there. Would/could I be even sensitive to cross contamination without actual celiac??

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Very interesting I was reading some articles by a Dr.H- about the neurological connection. I wonder often about my stroke. I started having nausea/stomach issues a month later had a stroke. TONS of tests and nothing....

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sorry, typo, I meant son has DQ2 and 7 (not 4 as I wrote) and usually Dq7 has the 05* alpha chain which is the most celiac prone part of the Dq2 or 7 gene. (dq4 of course does not have the 05* alpha chain so I never meant it)

sorry about the stroke.

Another thing comes to my mind, what about your PTH? (parathyroid hormone)

if you lose calcium, or have problems absorbing calcium and/or vitaminD, the PTH probably will get elevated and it might raise your blood pressure.

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