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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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  1. Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like. Ingredients: 1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions: Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender. Dish into bowls. Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!
  2. Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence. The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow. To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center. Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification. Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.” Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.” Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities. Read more.
  3. Celiac.com 05/16/2018 - Galectins are a family of animal lectins marked by their affinity for N-acetyllactosamine-enriched glycoconjugates. Galectins control several immune cell processes and influence both innate and adaptive immune responses. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the role of galectins, particularly galectin-1 (Gal-1), in the treatment of celiac disease. The research team included Victoria Sundblad, Amado A. Quintar, Luciano G. Morosi, Sonia I. Niveloni, Ana Cabanne, Edgardo Smecuol, Eduardo Mauriño, Karina V. Mariño, Julio C. Bai, Cristina A. Maldonado, and Gabriel A. Rabinovich. The researchers examined the role of galectins in intestinal inflammation, particularly in Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease patients, as well as in murine models resembling these inflammatory conditions. Maintaining the fine balance between host immunity and tolerance promotes gut homeostasis, and helps to prevent inflammation. To gain insight into the role of Gal-1 in celiac patients, the team demonstrated an increase in Gal-1 expression following a gluten-free diet along with an increase in the frequency of Foxp3+ cells. The resolution of the inflammatory response may promote the recovery process, leading to a reversal of gut damage and a regeneration of villi. Among other things, the team’s findings support the use of Gal-1 agonists to treat severe mucosal inflammation. In addition, Gal-1 may serve as a potential biomarker to follow the progression of celiac disease treatment. Gut inflammation may be governed by a coordinated network of galectins and their glycosylated ligands, triggering either anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory responses. That network may influence the interplay between intestinal epithelial cells and the highly specialized gut immune system in physiologic and pathologic settings. The team’s results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory and tolerogenic response associated with gluten-free diet in celiac patients is matched by a substantial up-regulation of Gal-1. This suggests a major role of this lectin in favoring resolution of inflammation and restoration of mucosal homeostasis. This data highlights the regulated expression of galectin-1 (Gal-1), a proto-type member of the galectin family, during intestinal inflammation in untreated and treated celiac patients. Further study of this area could lead to better understanding of the mechanisms behind celiac disease, and potentially to a treatment of the disease. Source: Front. Immunol., 01 March 2018. The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Laboratorio de Inmunopatología, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina; the Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Córdoba, Argentina; the Laboratorio de Glicómica Funcional y Molecular, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME), Consejo de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Sección Intestino Delgado, Departamento de Medicina, Hospital de Gastroenterología Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo, Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Unidad de Patología, Hospital de Gastroenterología, Bonorino Udaondo, Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Instituto de Investigaciones, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina; and the Departamento de Química Biológica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  4. Celiac.com 05/15/2018 - There is a good amount of anecdotal evidence that people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity can tolerate sourdough bread, but there is no good science to support such claims. To determine if sourdough bread help conquer wheat sensitivity, the Alberta Wheat Commission (AWC) is funding a team of researchers to see if the sourdough fermentation process can reduce or eliminate wheat components that trigger wheat sensitivity. The project will study the way the sourdough bread fermentation process breaks down proteins and carbohydrates in wheat flour. Chair of the AWC Research Committee, Terry Young, said new research suggests that wheat protein may not be the cause of gluten sensitivity in people without celiac disease. Longer fermentation, aka sourdough fermentation, is more common in Europe. Young says that reports indicate that “incidents of non-celiac sensitivity…are actually lower in Europe." He adds the current research will focus on the fermentation, but the future may include the development of wheat varieties for gluten sensitive individuals. The research will be led by food microbiologist at the University of Alberta, Dr. Michael Gänzle, who said the use of sourdough bread in industrial baking reduces ingredient costs and can improve the quality of bread as well. Dr. Gänzle wants to assess anecdotal claims that people with non-celiac wheat or gluten intolerance can tolerate sourdough bread. His team wants to “determine whether fermentation reduces or eliminates individual wheat components that are known or suspected to cause adverse effects.” The team readily admits that their project will not create products that are safe for people with celiac disease. They may, however, create products that are useful for people without celiac disease, but who are gluten sensitivity. The AWC is collaboratively funding the project with the Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission, and the Minnesota Wheat Research Promotion Council, which will contribute $57,250, and $20,000, respectively. The research team will issue a report of its findings after the project is completed in 2021. Studies like this are important to shed light on the differences between celiac and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Stay tuned for more developments in this exciting area of research. Source: highriveronline.com
  5. Celiac.com 05/14/2018 - An imbalance or defect in gut bacteria function may be a major cause of hair loss and pattern baldness. Pattern baldness (alopecia areata) affects approximately 1.7 per cent of the population and we still don’t know precisely what causes it. In addition to promoting a healthy digestive tract, our gut bacteria play an important function in our overall health. Recent experiments with antibiotics and bacteria-free mice reveal how a single a single gut bacteria, Lactobacillus murinus, could cause pattern baldness by triggering deficiencies in biotin. Biotin, vitamin B7, is a crucial vitamin. Biotin deficiency can lead to skin disease and hair loss. Some bacteria in our gut produces biotin, while other bacteria breaks down and consumes biotin. Biotin deficiency is most often seen in patients with serious conditions, such as celiac disease, but it can also be common among pregnant women. Previous research has shown that bacteria-free mice that lack biotin in their diet, develop mild hair loss (alopecia). Could an imbalance or defect in gut bacteria function be a major cause of hair loss and pattern baldness? To determine if the underlying cause of hairless might be an imbalance of our gut bacteria, a team of Japanese scientists conducted experiments with antibiotics and bacteria-free mice to see if variations gut bacteria might cause pattern baldness by influencing biotin levels. The team first fed laboratory mice a diet with and without biotin, but saw no impact on hair loss. They then repeated the experiment, but this time they also gave the mice a long course of antibiotics to destroy the balance of bacteria in their gut. The laboratory mice on a biotin-free diet coupled with antibiotics saw an increase in a particular gut bacteria that corresponded to patten hair loss, as was previously shown in bacteria-free mice. By studying what had happened in the gut bacteria of these mice, the scientists discovered that a particular type of lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus murinus, had expanded after the antibiotic treatment. When the team fed bacteria-free mice with Lactobacillus murinus, they saw that the hair loss became even worse and the mice became almost entirely bald. Further tests followed, in which regular mice and bacteria-free mice received a regular diet with normal levels of biotin, but added Lactobacillus murinus. These mice showed no hair loss at all. Direct injections of biotin also stopped hair loss; although the team did concede that skin bacteria could also play a role. The discovery that gut bacteria and diet to influence hair loss creates new avenues for treating baldness and hair loss simply by adjusting gut microbiota. It’s possible that probiotic dietary supplements can be used to influence gut bacteria, and prevent the biotin-eating bacteria now known to cause hair loss. Stay tuned for news on the role of gut bacteria in hair loss, and on any new treatment approaches to hair loss and alopecia that may result. Their results appear in the scientific journal Cell Reports.
  6. Celiac.com 05/11/2018 - Nestled in the foothills of Tuscany just a few miles north of Lucca, the Italian village of Fabbriche di Vallico is home to a famous chestnut mill that still produces chestnut flour. One of a very few in existence, and one of just two left in the region, the town’s mill is the only one to produce exclusively gluten-free flour. In fact, this quiet village about forty miles northwest of Florence has been making gluten-free chestnut flour since 1721. These days the town is known for for its hotels, such as the Renaissance Tuscany II Ciocco Resort & Spa that overlooks the Lucca valley. The hotel offers tours to the traditional Fabbriche di Vallico mill, which produces exclusively gluten-free flour, where guests can learn about the ancient tradition of grinding autumn chestnuts into sweet gluten-free chestnut flour and maybe even meet mill owner Fosco Bertogli, who's revived the nearly 300 year tradition. After the tour, visitors can learn to make pasta from these chestnuts with the property's head chef. Mr Bertogli tells me his "passion" is what got the mill running again in 1999. He sells the delicious, high quality chestnut flour for between ten and 12 euros for a one kilogram bag. Read more about this romantic gluten-free travel experience at DailyMail.co.uk.
  7. Celiac.com 05/10/2018 - Most people who suffer from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Some research has suggested that patients with Crohn's disease have an altered response to vitamin D, among other issues. The exact mechanism behind this is not well understood. To get a better picture of the problem, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate disease-specific gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from Crohn’s disease patients in clinical remission. The research team included Holger Schäffler, Maria Rohde, Sarah Rohde, Astrid Huth, Nicole Gittel, Hannes Hollborn, Dirk Koczan, Änne Glass, Georg Lamprecht, and Robert Jaster, with the Department of Medicine II, Division of Gastroenterology, Rostock University Medical Center in Rostock, Germany. The team began by genotyping patients with Crohn's disease in clinical remission or with very low disease activity according to nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2), and PBMCs from wild-type (WT)-NOD2 patients, and patients with homozygous or heterozygous NOD2 mutations. Meanwhile the team isolated healthy donors for further analysis. The team then cultured the cells with vitamin D, peptidoglycan (PGN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for defined periods of time before RNA was isolated and subjected to microarray analysis using Clariom S assays and quantitative real-time PCR. They assessed the NOD2- and disease-specific gene expression profiles with repeated measure ANOVA using a general linear model. The team used microarray assays to find 267 genes that were significantly up- or downregulated in PBMCs of WT-NOD2 patients, compared to healthy donors after challenge with vitamin D and/or a combination of LPS and PGN (P < 0.05; threshold: ≥ 2-fold change). For further analysis by real-time PCR, the team selected genes with known impact on inflammation and immunity that fulfilled predefined expression criteria. In a larger group of patients and controls, the team found a disease-associated expression pattern, with higher transcript levels in vitamin D-treated PBMCs from patients, in three of these genes, CLEC5A (P < 0.030), lysozyme (LYZ; P < 0.047) and TREM1 (P < 0.023). The team found six genes that were expressed in a NOD2-dependent manner (Crohn's disease101, P < 0.002; CLEC5A, P < 0.020; CXCL5, P < 0.009; IL-24, P < 0.044; ITGB2, P < 0.041; LYZ, P < 0.042). Interestingly, the team saw the highest transcript levels in patients with heterozygous NOD2 mutations. This study identifies CLEC5A and LYZ as Crohn's disease- and NOD2-associated genes of PBMCs and supports the need for further studies on their pathomechanistic roles. The team found that PBMCs of patients with Crohn's disease display alterations in their response to vitamin D and PAMPs. Disease-associated and NOD2-dependent gene expression profiles are preserved even during clinical remission. The team’s data identifies CLEC5A, LYZ and TREM1 as good candidates for follow-up study. The researchers propose that these genes may act in a common network relevant to celiac disease development. The research team remains committed to the longterm goal of biomarkers to that will accurately predict the clinical course of celiac disease. Source: World J Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 21; 24(11): 1196–1205. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v24.i11.1196
  8. Celiac.com 05/09/2018 - Is there a difference in celiac disease rates between people born via cesarian section versus those born via natural birth? To answer that question, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate the association between mode of delivery and the risk of celiac disease in two large population-based birth cohorts with different rates of diagnosed celiac disease. The research team included Stine Dydensborg Sander, Anne Vinkel Hansen, Ketil Størdal, Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen, Joseph A Murray, and Steffen Husby. They are variously affiliated with the Hans Christian Andersen Children’s Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; the Institute of Clinical Research, Faculty of Health Science, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; the Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; the Statistics Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Child Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; the Department of Pediatrics, Ostfold Hospital Trust, Grålum, Norway; and the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. For their observational register-based cohort study, the team used data from administrative and health registers from Denmark and Norway and linked the data at the individual level. Their study group included all children born in Denmark from January 1, 1995 to December 31, 2010 and all children born in Norway from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2012. The study group included included 1,051,028 children from Denmark, and 537,457 children from Norway. In total, cesarean sections 286,640 children were delivered by cesarian section, while a total of 3,314 children were diagnosed celiac disease. The team found no connection between the mode of delivery and the risk of diagnosed celiac disease. The adjusted odds ratio for celiac disease for children delivered by any type of cesarean section compared to vaginal delivery was 1.11 (95% CI: 0.96–1.29) in the Danish cohort and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.84–1.09) in the Norwegian cohort. The adjusted odds ratio for celiac disease for children delivered by elective cesarean section compared to vaginal delivery was 1.20 (95% CI: 1.00–1.43) in the Danish cohort and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.79–1.17) in the Norwegian cohort. This large registry-based study provides strong evidence that the mode of birth delivery does not have any influence on whether a child will go on to develop celiac disease. Source: Clin Epidemiol. 2018; 10: 323–332.Published online 2018 Mar 19. doi: 10.2147/CLEP.S152168
  9. Celiac.com 05/08/2018 - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an alert to healthcare providers about the risk of cross-contamination with certain endoscope connectors used in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The FDA warns that ”24-hour multi-patient use endoscope connectors,” carry cross-contamination risks. To help reduce the risk of cross-contamination and possible infection between patients, the FDA recommends that providers use connectors with backflow prevention features that prevent patient fluids from flowing back into the endoscope. The FDA warns that these connectors carry cross-contamination risks. "To date, the FDA has not received acceptable testing to demonstrate the safe use of these products, and recommends against their use," the FDA said. To help reduce the risk of cross-contamination and possible infection between patients, the FDA recommends that providers use connectors with backflow prevention features that prevent patient fluids from flowing back into the endoscope. Erbe USA Inc’s Erbeflow port connector is currently the only 24-hour, multi-patient-use endoscope connector with no back-flow prevention feature, so the FDA warning is clearly targeted at that device. According to an FDA assessment, because “the connector, tubing, and/or water bottle can become contaminated with blood, stool, or other fluids from previous patients,” the Erbeflow port connector does not “adequately mitigate the risks of cross-contamination for endoscopy patients.” The agency is encouraging health providers to use single-use and reusable endoscope connectors with backflow prevention features, and to make certain that reusable connectors are processed properly for each procedure. The agency is also encouraging healthcare professionals to report problems with these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program. Read more at FDA.gov.
  10. Celiac.com 05/07/2018 - Pursuing a hypothesis that Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) may be related, a team of researchers recently set out to assess the efficacy of a gluten-free diet in 29 patients with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome GTS in a prospective pilot study. The research team then evaluated patient progress after one year on a gluten-free diet. The research team included Luis Rodrigo, Nuria Álvarez, Enrique Fernández-Bustillo, Javier Salas-Puig, Marcos Huerta, and Carlos Hernández-Lahoz. To establish a baseline of conditions, the team used a series of questionnaires, including YGTSS, Y-BOCS/CY-BOCS and GTS-QOL, which they then compared before and after the gluten-free diet. The YGTSS questionnaires measured tics, while the Y-BOCS/CY-BOCS questionnaires measured the intensity and frequency of OCD. The study group included 23 children and 6 adults. In all, 74% of children and 50% of adults were male. When the study began, nearly 70% of children and 100% of adults showed OCD (NS). Both groups showed frequent symptoms of NCGS, with nearly half of the children and 83.6% of adults reporting headaches. After one year of gluten-free diet, both child and adult patients showed a substantial reduction in tics (YGTSS), a reduction in the intensity and frequency of OCD, along with improved QOL measurements. This study showed that both children and adults with Tourette syndrome and non-celiac gluten sensitivity who followed a gluten-free diet for one year showed a significant reduction in tics and OCD. A gluten-free diet seems to reduce tics and OCD both in both children and adults with Tourette syndrome and gluten sensitivity. Clearly larger studies are needed to confirm these finding, but this is exciting news for those with Tourette syndrome and the doctors who treat them. Meantime, the number of conditions that seem to improve with gluten-free diet treatment continues to grow. Stay tuned for more developments. Source: Preprints 2018, 2018040332. doi: 10.20944/preprints201804.0332.v1
  11. Celiac.com 05/05/2018 - With warm days on the horizon and hot days around the corner, a cool beverage will be mandatory, and a tasty new cool beverage recipe will be like money in the bank. This tart, fruity twist marries classic lemonade with fresh mint and smokey grilled pineapple for a delightfully refreshing afternoon drink that goes perfectly with your favorite grilled foods and snacks. Be sure to add a chunk of pineapple or a slice of lemon to the rim of the glass. This glorious marriage grilled pineapple, mint and lemonade is a crisp, fruity twist marries classic lemonade with fresh mint and smokey grilled pineapple for a delightfully refreshing afternoon drink that goes perfectly with your favorite grilled foods and snacks. Ingredients: 12 ounces fresh pineapple, sliced 8 cups hot water 6-7 tablespoons granulated sugar, to taste 2 cups fresh lemon juice (10-12 large lemons) Sprigs of fresh mint Directions: Grill peeled and cored pineapple slices on a hot, well-oiled grill until juicy, but with nice char marks on both sides. Set grilled pineapple slices aside to cool. Combine 48 cups hot water and sugar in a large pitcher, and stir with a whisk until sugar is fully dissolved. Process pineapple 1 mint sprig and lemon juice in a blender until relatively smooth. Pour mixture through a fine-mesh strainer into pitcher with sugar mixture; discard solids. Stir well until fully blended. Serve over muddled mint and ice. Garnish with a seared pineapple slice, fresh lemon slices and/or sprigs of mint. If you're a grown-up who is booze inclined, you can add vodka, tequila or clear rum as desired.
  12. Celiac.com 05/02/2018 - Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder, not an allergy. Celiac disease affects abut 1 in 100 people, and requires professional diagnosis and treatment with a gluten-free diet. There is a good deal of confusion and inaccurate information about celiac disease and a gluten-free diet. Here are some important things to know about celiac disease: 1) Celiac Disease Doesn’t Always Have Obvious Symptoms People with celiac disease may have few or no symptoms. In fact, these days, most people diagnosed with celiac disease, report few or no symptoms. Classic gastrointestinal symptoms include bloating, diarrhea, gas, constipation, and gut pain after consuming wheat, barley or rye. Other prominent symptoms can include fatigue, headache, poor weight gain, and depression. Less classic, but still common celiac symptoms include one or more of the following: anemia, anxiety, skin rashes, infertility, irritability, joint pain, pale mouth sores, thin bones, tingling and/or numbness in hands and feet. 2) No Symptoms Doesn't Mean No Damage The level of celiac-related symptoms or complaints a person has does not equate to the level of gut damage. Few or no symptoms does not mean little or no gut damage. People can have severe celiac symptoms, yet relatively light gut damage on biopsy, or conversely, they can have light symptoms and still have serious gut damage on biopsy. 3) A Simple Antibody Test Can Point the Way If you suspect celiac disease, be sure to talk with your doctor. A simple antibody test or two is usually sufficient to rule celiac disease in or out. If the test is positive, then a doctor will likely recommend a biopsy for confirmation. Recent studies show that a combination of two antibody tests may be better than biopsy. Usually, patients need to be eating wheat when they are tested for celiac disease, but that is changing. There are also some promising new approaches to blood testing for celiac disease. 4) Early Diagnosis is Key The longer you go without treatment, the higher the risk of gut damage, and the greater the likelihood of developing associated conditions. Early diagnosis is especially important in the elderly, as they have a greater risk of developing associated conditions and complications from untreated celiac disease. Still diagnosing celiac disease can be tricky and can take time, partly because the symptoms can be vague, seem unrelated, and can mimic other conditions. 5) No Cure Currently, there is no cure for celiac disease. Several companies are working to develop a vaccine, or other immune therapy for celiac disease, but until we see a major scientific breakthrough, there is no cure for celiac disease. 6) Gluten-Free Diet is Mandatory A gluten-free diet is the only treatment for celiac disease. For people with celiac disease, a gluten-free diet is mandatory, not optional. If people with celiac disease consume wheat, rye or barley proteins they risk causing serious damage to their health, including gut damage and potential cancer, especially in the long term. 7) Full Gut Healing Can Take Time Recent studies show that most people with celiac disease begin to see gut healing in the first year or year and a half. The vast majority of celiacs on a gluten-free it heal within two to three years. Gut healing usually corresponds to healing in other affected parts of the body, such as improvements in bone microarchitecture, neuropathy, and other areas of celiac-associated damage. 8) Gluten Sensitivity Can Increase The longer you go without gluten, the more sensitive you may become to accidental gluten ingestion. It’s not uncommon for people with celiac disease to see their sensitivity to gluten increase in the weeks and even years after they give up gluten. That can mean that accidental gluten ingestion can bring on symptoms that are more severe than their original complaints. For many people, this sensitivity may slowly taper off and decrease over time. For others, sensitivity remains high and requires extra vigilance about to make sure food is gluten-free. Remember, increased gluten sensitivity does not equal increased gut damage. For some, a fully healed gut may be more sensitive to gluten than a damaged one, and vice versa. Among people on a gluten-free diet due to celiac disease, sensitivity can vary. 9) Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) is a Thing You can be sensitive to gluten and not have celiac disease. Researchers have recently confirmed a condition called non-gluten sensitivity. People with this condition experience celiac-like symptoms when they consume gluten. However, they typically do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin, and they typically have a clean biopsy, so no gut damage. Some studies have cast doubt on the existence of non-gluten-celiac sensitivity. Other studies have shown that many people with NCGS react to gluten. Still other studies show that Fructan has emerged as one possible culprit. 10) You Can Still Live a Healthy Life and Eat Delicious Food Having celiac disease means making some important adjustments to your diet, but it’s still possible to live a healthy life and eat tasty food. Read more about the best gluten-free breads, burgers, pizzas, and all your favorite gluten-free treats. Here is a list of SAFE and UNSAFE foods for people with celiac disease. Here is a list of easy, list of easy, delicious gluten-free recipes. Here is a list of great gluten-free sandwich breads. Here is a list of great gluten-free Mexican Fast Food Chains. Here's a recipe for a delicious gluten-free No-Bake Cheesecake. Knowledge is Power Use Celiac.com, and the Celiac.com Forums to get important information and to share your experience with others like you. Other great celiac disease resources include: The Mayo Clinic Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Gluten Intolerance Group of North America
  13. Celiac.com 05/01/2018 - Celiac disease is marked by a variety of intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms. One of the most common and best described expressions of celiac disease outside the gut is the presence of osteopenia and osteoporosis, which make for a higher fracture risk. A team of researchers recently set out to see if a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves bone mineralization. The research team included MB Zanchetta, AF Costa, V Longobardi, R Mazure, F Silveira, MP Temprano, H Vázquez, C Bogado, SI Niveloni, E Smecuol, ML Moreno, A González, E Mauriño, JR Zanchetta, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Instituto de Diagnóstico e Investigaciones Metabólicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Research Institute, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Department of Medicine, Dr C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterología Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina; and with Consejo de Investigaciones en Salud, Health Ministry, Buenos Aires City Government, Buenos Aires, Argentina. These researchers previously identified a significant deterioration of bone microarchitecture in premenopausal women with newly diagnosed celiac disease using high‐resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT). In that study, the team also compared 1‐year results with those of a control group of healthy premenopausal women of similar age and BMI in order to assess whether the micro-architectural parameters of treated celiac patients had reached the values expected for their age. While that study showed that a year on a gluten-free diet had improved most of the women’s bone parameters, it also showed that those parameters continued to be significantly lower than those of healthy control subjects. In a recent paper, the team describes the results of their study that offers data to show improvements bone mineralization microarchitecture in celiac patients after three years on a gluten-free diet. Source: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017 Oct 6. pii: S1542-3565(17)31200-4. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.09.054.
  14. Celiac.com 04/30/2018 - Rosacea is one of the most common skin diseases, and usually manifests as chronic inflammation of the eyes and the central part of the face. Rosacea is medically harmless, but it can trigger strong self-consciousness and reduce people’s overall enjoyment of life. For most people, symptoms of rosacea include flushing and erythrosis or reddening of the face. A small percentage of patients also get the formation of papules and pustules, with phymata. Doctors have posited numerous possible triggers, including hypochlorhydria, dysmotility, anatomic anomalies of the intestine, and immunologic causes. SIBO is an acronym for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, a medical condition marked by an abnormally high concentration of bacteria in the jejunal aspirate on culture. SIBO is more common in people with rosacea than it is in the general population, and when SIBO is treated with antibiotics, skin lesions vanish in nearly 100% of cases. This remission lasts for at least 9 months in about 80% of patients. The same thing happened when unresponsive SIBO patients receiving placebo as part of a study were switched to antibiotics, so the evidence is very strong. It’s well known that numerous patients with rosacea have stomach and gut complaints, including dyspepsia, bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain of a cramping nature, altered bowel habits such as alternating constipation and diarrhea, and meteorism. It’s also not uncommon for rosacea patients have to suffer from medical conditions such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, gastritis due to H. pylori overgrowth, lipase deficiencies, hypochlorhydria, and diseases affecting the small intestinal mucosa. Rosacea patients show a good response to a variety of antibiotics, including tetracycline or macrolide drugs, metronidazole, or chloramphenicol. The overwhelmingly positive response to antibiotics, coupled with the fact that many rosacea patients see symptom improvement when treated with drugs that speed intestinal movement, lends support to the idea that skin lesions have a bacterial origin. Still, evidence of bacterial role in rosacea has been far from clear. Some researchers suspect that rosacea lesions result from increased intestinal permeability in patients with SIBO, which in turn might lead to translocation or pro-inflammatory cytokine release. Earlier studies have linked rosacea with certain genetic variants in the genomes of rosacea sufferers that were strongly associated with the disorder, including genetic variants in or near the HLA-DRA and BTNL2 genes. Interestingly, these areas of the genome are also associated with autoimmune disease, including type I diabetes and celiac disease. Read more about rosacea and SIBO at News-medical.net, and at Rosacea.org.
  15. Celiac.com 04/28/2018 - Looking for a tasty, memorable, gluten-free dish to star in your next breakfast or brunch production? This Spanish-style egg and potato omelette is just the thing. A simple blend of eggs, onions and potatoes is coaxed into a delicious, memorable entreé. For the eggs and potatoes: 1 pound Yukon Gold or other yellow potatoes 9 large eggs ¾ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 medium yellow onion Coarse sea salt Freshly ground black pepper For the herbed mayonnaise: Handful of fresh dill. Or any blend of any herbs you like, including mint, basil and thyme ⅓ cup mayonnaise ½ lemon For the eggs and potatoes: Heat the oil in a 9-inch cast-iron or ovenproof skillet, over medium heat. Rinse and cut the potatoes into ¼-inch rounds, placing them flat in the skillet as you work. Peel the onion and cut into thin slices, adding them to the pan. Cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally so the potatoes brown on both sides and don’t stick to the pan. Strain oil through a heatproof colander into a heatproof bowl. Position an oven rack 6 inches from the heated broiler element. Put aside at least 1 tablespoon of the onion-flavored oil; you can save the rest to use again later. Whisk the eggs in a large bowl, then season generously with salt and pepper. Add the drained potato-onion mixture and stir to coat. Coat the empty skillet with reserved oil and heat to medium high. Pour in the egg-potato mixture. Reduce the heat to medium-low; cook for about 5 minutes, until the edges are just set. Transfer to the oven and broil about 3 minutes, or until puffy and golden brown. Prepare the herbed mayo by mincing the dill or other herbs, and place in medium bowl, along with the mayo. Squeeze in the juice from the ½ lemon, stirring until well mixed. Use a thin spatula to loosen around the edges of the eggs and then under them. Slide cooked eggs and potatoes out of the pan and onto a cutting board. Sprinkle with a dash of salt, and allow to rest a few minutes. Cut into 6 equal wedges, and serve warm or at room temperature, with dollops of the dill mayonnaise.