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AKcollegestudent

I Love Misinformation....

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I follow a number of food communities, and one had an interesting recipe for stuffed zucchini; it was naturally gluten-free and I decided to check comments to see what others thought.

Someone else noted that it was gluten-free and that she was looking forward to the millet and chickpea combination.

The original poster informed them that no, it wasn't gluten-free. Apparently, her mother was routinely glutened by millet. I asked if the millet was CC'ed, since--as far as I know, and as far as Google tells me--millet's gluten-free.

She replies that no, there's a minor amount of gluten in it.

What gives? I'm about 95% certain that she's incorrect (not least because millet's from a vastly different plant family), but I'm not even certain how to correct her information.

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Maybe Millet in itself is Gluten free, but has a high probability of being cross contaminated with Wheat like being harvested with Wheat or processed in the same factories?

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Millet is definitely gluten-free, although contamination can occur with anything. It is not likely, since millet and wheat are not generally processed in the same facilities.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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Millet is definitely gluten-free, although contamination can occur with anything. It is not likely, since millet and wheat are not generally processed in the same facilities.

Oh good. I seriously thought that I was losing my mind. Thanks for affirming my sanity!

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I made a loaf of lemon millet seed bread this weekend and no problems here.

I have also used millet flour in baking bread.

I use Bob's Red Mill for flour and Eden Foods for the seeds.


Long history of IBS, and stomach/intestinal problems. Low on iron for all of my life.

Low on energy, with aches and pains in my joints and in my whole body for as long as I can remember.

Mostly lactose intolerant for all of my life (except for yoghurt)

Diagnosed in 2003 by naturapath as wheat intolerant. Tried it then fell of the wagon. In Feb. 2010 tried going gluten-free.

Went back to the poison in March, 2010.

Tested negative for celiac in April, 2010 (based on negative biopsy and normal tTG test). IgA tested 30-40 percent higher than normal.

Not going to fight the diagnosis because I refuse to go back to the poison. Happily gluten-free for health reasons as of April 2010, and not looking back.

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Millet is gluten-free--the person was most likely intolerant to it.


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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Give them the wikipedia link.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millet This is an ancient Asian and African cereal grass. Little round seeds. Drought tolerant.

The millets include species in several genera, mostly in the subfamily Panicoideae, of the grass family Poaceae. Of the major and minor millets (not including those plants sometimes called millet) all of the species are in the tribe Paniceae of the subfamily Panicoideae except for finger millet.

and the standard definition of celiac/gluten intolerance is an auto immune reaction to the protein called gluten in wheat, rye, spelt, and barley.

Wheat family is TRITICUM. Comes from the "fertile crescent" in the mid east.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat Oblong, has hulls or husks that need to be removed to use as food.

Main article: Gluten sensitivity

Roughly 1% of Indo-European populations[20][21] has coeliac (also written as celiac) disease

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