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Glutenfreenoobie

High Fiber Lots Of Water, Sweating, And Celiac

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Lately I've been doing sweaty work, eating fresh watermelon, drinking fruit smoothies, and consuming hot soup. I feel great, despite my recent gluten in take (about 2 weeks ago). My acid reflux has stopped, I'm farting more, belching less, stomach is calm, and just feeling good in general.

I've been thinking back about last summer and spring when I was eating gluten. Last spring I was sick from mid February-July. In July something happened. I got hot and started to sweat. I swear even though I was eating gluten my symptoms were reduced because of the sweating.

Later that summer I went into saunas, ate watermelon, and drank lots of water. Do you see the pattern here? I'm thinking if you suspect someone to be a Celiac, but that person is not willing to go gluten free, instead that person may benefit greatly from a high fiber, lots of water, sweating, and soup diet. If the Celiac in question feels better perhaps that person has Celiac.

From what I understand gluten is a toxin to Celiacs. So if you accidentally consume gluten or suspect that you consumed gluten you should flush your system with water and sweating. Thoughts? Anyone else tried a lifestyle and diet like I mentioned? What might be a possible explanation of my method working?

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The problem is any stress on the body can increase the risk/severity of celiac. My symptoms actually increased (significantly) when I started a running program (before I went gluten-free).

As to why water helps--the water helps flush out the gluten and keeping hydrated would lessen the severity of some symptoms (like diarrhea).

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The problem is any stress on the body can increase the risk/severity of celiac. My symptoms actually increased (significantly) when I started a running program (before I went gluten-free).

As to why water helps--the water helps flush out the gluten and keeping hydrated would lessen the severity of some symptoms (like diarrhea).

Good point, I didn't make it clear that I gradually introduced the purging elements. The heat and sweating was natural, then I started drinking more water in response. A few weeks went by and then I started going to the gym, working progressively harder. In fact I didn't so much as work out as sweat a lot.

Next, I started eating the watermelon and other healthy foods. Another way to look at myself feeling better is what came first? I had to feel better before I started exercising. So the sweating came first followed by water. I think the sweating and water helped me the most.

Now that I think of it running did increase my symptoms too, in Feb. So sweat more, exercise lightly . :) Btw running in any way shape or form is not mild exercise. :) I should know I was a runner until I developed what I think is Celiac. I noticed running wasn't making me feel good any more so I stopped. Seriously just walk slowly with a friend and a drink of water when its hot enough to sweat.

I noticed that I seemed to develop celiac Feb 2009. I was under a lot of stress. "The problem is any stress on the body can increase the risk/severity of celiac." Is the above quote really true because in Feb 2009 I was under a lot of stress. Maybe I developed Celiac because of the stress.

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If you think you've accidently consumed gluten, flush your system with probiotics.

In my fruit smoothies I've been including yogurt, Brand Fage or something. My system seems to be able to tolerate some dairy or otherwise the yogurt would make me worse. I've heard that Celiac can make you lactose intolerant. So how much yogurt you think a Celiac could handle?

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The bacteria that are responsible for converting milk into yogurt feed off of lactose. This means that the lactose content of yogurt is naturally lower than the milk itself which would mean it's much easier on digestion than regular dairy products would be.

Your question overall is too broad, there is no specific amount of exact lactose digestion damage that is caused by a gluten intolerance, the severity (or actual occurrence) differs for each person. Additionally as the healing process progresses many celiacs notice a change in the severity of their lactose intolerance for the better. Technically everyone on the planet is lactose intolerant. The body can only produce so much lactase enzyme and even someone with an iron gut can gulp enough milk down their throat to overwhelm their gut's supply of lactase.

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The bacteria that are responsible for converting milk into yogurt feed off of lactose. This means that the lactose content of yogurt is naturally lower than the milk itself which would mean it's much easier on digestion than regular dairy products would be.

Your question overall is too broad, there is no specific amount of exact lactose digestion damage that is caused by a gluten intolerance, the severity (or actual occurrence) differs for each person. Additionally as the healing process progresses many celiacs notice a change in the severity of their lactose intolerance for the better. Technically everyone on the planet is lactose intolerant. The body can only produce so much lactase enzyme and even someone with an iron gut can gulp enough milk down their throat to overwhelm their gut's supply of lactase.

Alright I understand. I guess what I'm really asking is how much yogurt should I be eating a day?

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You don't really need to stress the exact amount and schedule so much, the bacteria obtained from these sources can set up shop in your intestine and live for a while in your guts working their magic. Fermentation is the oldest known method of food preservation and so we as humans have been "supplementing" with these lactic acid bacteria for a very long time, traditionally mainly in the winter months when a fresh harvest wasn't available. You don't need to consume it every day but it's probably a good idea to consume a fermented food at least a couple of times a week since they confer numerous additional benefits besides the bacteria. Additional fermented goodies include: kefir, (real) sauerkraut or kim chi (make sure that one says it's gluten free).

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You don't really need to stress the exact amount and schedule so much, the bacteria obtained from these sources can set up shop in your intestine and live for a while in your guts working their magic. Fermentation is the oldest known method of food preservation and so we as humans have been "supplementing" with these lactic acid bacteria for a very long time, traditionally mainly in the winter months when a fresh harvest wasn't available. You don't need to consume it every day but it's probably a good idea to consume a fermented food at least a couple of times a week since they confer numerous additional benefits besides the bacteria. Additional fermented goodies include: kefir, (real) sauerkraut or kim chi (make sure that one says it's gluten free).

Well I've been consuming yogurt in my smoothies everyday for at least a week now. I've heard of sauerkraut but not kefir nor kim chi.

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