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I know its a little early but I am thinking about ideas for my daughter when she goes back to preschool. She goes to the preschool at the elementary school out here. She went last year and ate at school even when she got diabetes in october the teacher got the carbs amount and would figure out how much insulin she needed but now she has celiac too. So now I gotta figure out some meals because I am guessing they won't be able to do gluten-free there to. Her school starts back in the middle of august. Also do any of you have your kids homeschooled cause of celiac.

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I know its a little early but I am thinking about ideas for my daughter when she goes back to preschool. She goes to the preschool at the elementary school out here. She went last year and ate at school even when she got diabetes in october the teacher got the carbs amount and would figure out how much insulin she needed but now she has celiac too. So now I gotta figure out some meals because I am guessing they won't be able to do gluten-free there to. Her school starts back in the middle of august. Also do any of you have your kids homeschooled cause of celiac.

I chose to homeschool my daughter who is turning 5 next month because of celiac. I went to register her for public school when everyone else did and at that time I spoke to the school nurse who was not informed at all, she told us to give our child a small amount of gluten everyday to get over the problem, and I also spoke to the teacher my daughter would have and what I heard from the teacher made me realize that for my family it would be ridiculous to have my daughter attend public school when I am home all day. One problem was that there would be no measures taken against cc, there was already a no food sharing policy and she would just eat her own food plus they did not have time to wash their hands before and after snack (they just use hand sanitizer), I considered this very risky since while my youngest gets bad GI symtoms my oldest seems to suffer from some neuro symptoms that frankly scare me a bit. The other problems are things that I probably would have never considered if not for talking to the teachers about the celiac, one of those problems being that if my daughter already knew about something (like phonics) she would just have to sit there and be bored plus there is only one way that the teacher will present the subject matter and that way is not the way my daughter learns best. At her age she already knows the letter sounds and blends, how to read basic words and sound out others, basic comprehension of stories, sequencing, sorting, numbers through 60 by recognition and can count to 45, can tell time on a digital clock, can tie her shoes, can do basic addition and subtraction and has a basic understanding of 1 c, 1/2 c and 1/4 c measurements and the difference between a teaspoon and tablespoon. She didn't learn these things from sitting down listening to someone talk, she learned through songs, games and crafts (the measurements came from cooking with me and her father). In light of all this I decided that if I sent her to public school I would be putting her at risk of getting sick, but that she may learn better at home with me since I can take the time and let her learn the way that she learns best and teach her other things that matter like nutrition and cooking along with the other basics. And I also do not feel that it is necessary for a child that age to be subjected to rude comments because we don't follow the standard gluten filled diet (She got made fun of a few times in preschool for having to eat differently and it made it more difficult for her to eat gluten free even though she knew that it made her, mommy and little sister feel better. I will also be teaching her a way to deal with rude comments that doesn't involve tantrums or not wanting to eat.)

I apologize for this being so long, both topics are a huge part of my life at this time. I hope that I was able to help and if you have any questions just ask. Good luck on your decision.

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We discussed homeschooling but chose to goto public school instead. I admit cleanliness is not ideal and I have had to tweek a few things to get them to my liking but really it all depends on the teachers and principal. We have a very understanding principal and she promotes safety in classrooms.

I had my daughter moved to an end seat in her group to reduce cross contamination at the desks. I also asked the teachers to stress how to properly clean a desk ie: not side to side effectively pushing gluten onto her desk but to do the top to bottom method collecting crumbs and tossing them in trash. The classrooms have sinks and wipes and they use them before and after eating.

Our school lets my DD heat up her lunch in the teachers lunch room using their microwave so her meal options have increased. (only homemade lunches for us) The lid is loosened but not removed and the amount of time is noted. I write all this on the tupperware so their is no questions.

I note school supplies she could not handle ( playdoh, certain clays, paper mache mix unless no flour added , science projects etc..)

The hardest part is birthday/holiday celebrations. We were able to limit the cupakes sent in but not eliminate them. We had 3 birthday in 2 weeks in June, and I wanted to scream. But otherwise it wasn't too bad.

We are hoping (we meaning me and many allergen moms) they eliminate the birthday food celebration starting this fall.

good luck!

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How about coop preschool or a preschool where you go too most of the time. That would be my first thought. Or get in a play group and a few sports things and that would be perfect too. We did private swim lesson when she was 4. It was a very special time.

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Oh yeah I forgot about all the school stuff like playdough having gluten. my daughters have just gotten diagnose and i have had it for 7 mths though we dont have playdough here at our house what other school stuff has gluten.

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I just read some of the other replys. Yes we had similar experience last year. My son's teacher told us she didn't believe in food alergies linked to behavior and fed cup cakes to my son even though we had a Dr.'s note turned in. So this can be a real problem!

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Our school so far has been great to work with. The cafeteria manager understood about cross contamination and they kept a separate (new) cutting board to prepare her food on. One specific person was assigned the task to make her lunch daily after the manager prepared the menu. I was given a copy of the menu a month ahead so I could double-check questionable items (taco sauce, bbq sauce, etc). I always remember the cafeteria staff at holidays and end of school with gifts and thank you notes.

The teachers have been great as well. My daughter has her own supplies (everything, including sanitizer) and class parties included my input (although sometimes I simply sent the item, especially pizza parties). I've asked her teachers to discuss her diagnosis respectfully but casually with the class when the subject comes up (How come she doesn't eat regular cookies?, etc). I was really surprised at Halloween when the kids were exchanging candy. The majority of the class made sure to purchase candy that was gluten free and told her that they asked their parents to buy her something they knew she could eat.

If there is a class party, I send in a cupcake (or candy if I have no time) so it's not so difficult. Sometimes 'surprise' parties happen at school and she typically just politely refuses the cupcake/cookie and then I do something special for her later.

The teachers are aware that she may have to bolt from the room to dash to the bathroom if there's a problem. My daughter is aware that she's expected to follow classroom rules and not abuse the privileges she has.

It's worked out for us so far. She is going into 4th grade this year. I have heard that the middle school lunchroom is not goood at all, so things may be difficult in the future.

I think a person's experience is directly related to how willing the school is to work with them.

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Personally, I would not homeschool just because a child has a health condition. There are so many other factors to consider and it can be a fun, though tough, road to follow. I homeschool and overall, really love it and enjoy myself. And it makes it that much easier with mine having celiac. However, if you are involved and proactive and work with the school, it can be done, just like anything in life. Good luck making your decision. It's such a personal one. And, for the mom who wants birthdays eliminated, I would wish that too. Even without allergies/intolerances, our kids get enough junk. Leave it for the family/friends to celebrate.

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Edit: Just saw the part about diabetes. My post is referencing only the celiac.

As a teacher, I've taught several children with different dietary restrictions.

I can tell you that to maximize the response of the school faculty, your best strategy is to enter into discussions with what YOU (not they) can do to help your child successfully navigate public school with dietary restrictions. It sets a good tone from the beginning and makes the staff much more willing to be open to your ideas and suggestions later about what THEY can do. When a parent tells me before the year starts that their child has some special dietary needs, I usually schedule a time where I can sit down with them and give them my full attention.

If your child's medical issue affects his or her learning, there is the chance for a health impaired label, which in most states allows for a health IEP of sorts. You may want to contact the school district main office to inquire about health plans, etc.

Also make sure they know this is medical issue and not a choice you made based on some article in a magazine. I wouldn't mention that if parents haven't done it. This week they are cutting out bread. Next week they feel bread now has a good aura, but carrots are taboo. I wish I were kidding.

While your child is young and will need adult help with food selections, they can begin to be educated about what they can and can not have. Teach them that it's OK to say "No" when offered food from someone else and maybe practice one or two things they can tell people who do offer them food or ask about their special diet. Role-playing at home can be good with these situations.

They need to be allowed to wash their hands before eating, of course, and maybe some type of lunch mat to sit on top of a table?

When I eat in the school cafeteria (not from the line, but at a table) I bring my own container, etc. and make sure that my food doesn't come into contact with the table. Baby wipes in the lunchbox have been helpful, too.

Good luck!

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I have mine at a private school and they have an A4 page on the wall of the classroom and in the office with her photo on it and that she has Coeliacs and what it means and what to do if she gets glutened. It has my numbers and the number of her paediatrician and gp too. They are vigilant about it at her school along with nut allergies and various other things. They only bring food from home though so I don't have to worry about the school providing the right food for her.

My concern is what happens on the school camp. What will they eat? What will they do? Not only around Coeliacs but also in regards to things like sometimes they will go fishing and cook the fish they've caught which goes against all our core values as a family. But she'll be 11 by the time of her first camp or maybe 12 depending on when it is through that year so hopefully will have a better idea of how to protect herself from cross contamination and be strong in her own thoughts.

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Talk and educate the school. More and more students are coming in with special diets. It is our job as parents to teach our kids, advocate on their behalf....

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