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I'm making bread, and have all of my flours except for the garfava flour. Does anyone know a flour I can use to substitute until I can find some? I live out in the middle of nowhere and it's very hard to find all of this stuff! Thanks!


Julienne

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This flour is used because it has a relatively high protein content. I think you could probably use any other bean flour (including soy) if you have it, or sorghum or millet. If you don't have these around (because everyone always has these around, right? :rolleyes: ) you could probably use brown rice flour. You might want to add a little more protein in the form of 1 t of gelatin or 1/4 c of dry milk powder, or increase the xanthan gum slightly (1/2 t - 1 t) to help it hold together.


Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

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This flour is used because it has a relatively high protein content. I think you could probably use any other bean flour (including soy) if you have it, or sorghum or millet. If you don't have these around (because everyone always has these around, right? :rolleyes: ) you could probably use brown rice flour. You might want to add a little more protein in the form of 1 t of gelatin or 1/4 c of dry milk powder, or increase the xanthan gum slightly (1/2 t - 1 t) to help it hold together.

OH WOW! YOU'RE GOOD! An expert I see! Would quiona work? I think I have millet, but sorghum and garfava are 2 that I haven't been able to find yet... THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!! :-) I'm a newby and I really want my son to have good food! I got my bread machine and kitchenaid all ready to go! I'm trying to make his food rather than buy to save on cost! Had no idea it would cost me $500 to stock up on all the crazy flours and stuff!


Julienne

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OH While I have you're attention EXPERT :-), Do I HAVE to make all of my gluten free breads on the gluten free setting of the bread machine? Some recipes tell me to put it on the sweet bread setting, and I get confused! I only have one gluten free setting on my bread maker... THANKS! :-)


Julienne

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The gluten free setting on your breadmaker is for gluten free yeast breads, because they go through only one rise instead of the two for regular yeast breads. Sweet breads normally use only baking powder/soda and so don't go through a rise phase.


Neroli

"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973

Lactose free 1990

(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's

Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007

Soy free March 2008

Nightshade free Feb 2009

Citric acid free June 2009

Potato starch free July 2009

(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009

Legume free March 2010

Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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I'm making bread, and have all of my flours except for the garfava flour. Does anyone know a flour I can use to substitute until I can find some? I live out in the middle of nowhere and it's very hard to find all of this stuff! Thanks!

You can use straight garbanzo or fava, or yellow pea flower. Generally, bean flours are more likely to be interchangeable, though soy is notably different than most in baking performance.

This flour is used because it has a relatively high protein content. I think you could probably use any other bean flour (including soy) if you have it, or sorghum or millet. If you don't have these around (because everyone always has these around, right? :rolleyes: ) you could probably use brown rice flour. You might want to add a little more protein in the form of 1 t of gelatin or 1/4 c of dry milk powder, or increase the xanthan gum slightly (1/2 t - 1 t) to help it hold together.

I'm sorry, but neither sorghum, millet, or rice flours would sub for garfava flour. Adding gelatin won't produce the same baking performance either. As for the milk powder, that may soften the texture, which can bring the results closer to what a bean flour typically does, but the blend of flours might still prevent the results from getting near what the recipe author intended. Increasing the xanthan is not likely to be of benefit. Again, sorry, but my experience tells me these things won't replace garfava while maintaining the same results.

You may, however, use some soy for a percentage of the garfava flour, but it can't likely replace all of it. Soy tends to make the texture much softer than other bean flours. Some quinoa may indeed work. Perhaps if you post the flours you do have (or can acquire), and the recipe, we can provide better assistance. You may ultimately need to use a different recipe, or purchase your flours over the Internet.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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Rice Guy's likely right. If you substitute different things, the loaf you get will be different from the original recipe. This could be good or bad, depending on how it turns out. If you're planning to make most of your family's bread, you'll eventually have to experiment to get these breads to come out right and you can expect some failures while you experiment. I tried a lot of recipes before settling on a few for specific uses - one for crumbs, one for sandwiches, etc. Expect a few of them to not work out, but remember you can always take a stupid loaf and make it into bread crumbs or croutons while you try again. You might also find it easier and cheaper to eat less bread - if you depend on bread less, than you can bake for pleasure instead of as a chore. Good luck!


Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

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OH While I have you're attention EXPERT :-), Do I HAVE to make all of my gluten free breads on the gluten free setting of the bread machine? Some recipes tell me to put it on the sweet bread setting, and I get confused! I only have one gluten free setting on my bread maker... THANKS! :-)

THANK YOU! :-) Heres another one for you... I have a gluten free white bread recipe and it's telling me to put it on the White bread setting???? I'm going to to it on my gluten-free setting first and cross my fingers. If it turns out bad, trying it on the other. I'm finding this rather aggravating in making things. There are so many contradictions in everything I read and what everyone says! But I'm just taking the advice of another member on here and going to accept that I will have failures, and eventually will come up with the perfect breads for us.... ;)


Julienne

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