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Anti Gad Antibodies

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Hi all,

This is my first post!  I have gluten sensitivity with serum and fecal evidence including, IgG, IgA and HLA DQ1 gene. Celiac panel was normal. I also have very high serum anti GAD antibodies (390 U/ml) along with crippling stiffness and spasms, (potentially stiff person syndrome) not to mention unbearable fatigue.  I began a strict gluten-free diet as of 1/5/14 and the stiffness is very slowly receding.

 

I haven't read about anti GAD antibodies on this forum but others must have them, if you can relate please let me know.

 

Best regards,

Frank 

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20456245

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stiff_person_syndrome

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glutamate_decarboxylase

 

 

 
GAD antibody-associated neurological illness and its relationship to gluten sensitivity.
 
Abstract
BACKGROUND:

The high prevalence of gluten sensitivity in patients with stiff-person syndrome (SPS) lead us to investigate the relationship between gluten sensitivity and GAD-antibody-associated diseases.

METHODS:

We used ELISA assays for anti-GAD and for serological markers of gluten sensitivity. Patients were recruited from clinics based at the Royal Hallamshire hospital, Sheffield, UK. Patients with gluten sensitivity were followed up after the introduction of a gluten-free diet and serological testing was repeated.

RESULTS:

Six of seven (86%) patients with SPS were positive for anti-GAD, mean titre 109 U/ml; This compared with 9/90 (11%) patients with idiopathic sporadic ataxia, mean titre 32 U/ml, 16/40 (40%) patients with gluten ataxia, mean titre 25 U/ml, and 6/10 patients with type 1 diabetes only, mean titre 8 U/ml. None of 32 patients with celiac disease only, and of 40 patients with genetic ataxia were positive for anti-GAD. The titre of anti-GAD reduced following the introduction of a gluten-free diet in patients with SPS who had serological evidence of gluten sensitivity. The same was observed in patients with gluten ataxia and anti-GAD antibodies. This was also associated with clinical improvement.

CONCLUSION:

These findings suggest a link between gluten sensitivity and GAD antibody-associated diseases.

 

 

 

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Have you posted on a dialectic website? Since anti-GAD antibodies are also linked to type 1 diabetes. I am glad you are finding relief on the gluten-free diet. Be careful of cross contamination. Check out our newbie section for more tips as gluten is hidden in so many places!

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/

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Have you posted on a dialectic website? Since anti-GAD antibodies are also linked to type 1 diabetes. I am glad you are finding relief on the gluten-free diet. Be careful of cross contamination. Check out our newbie section for more tips as gluten is hidden in so many places!

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/

Thank you for that CL,

I'm guessing anti GAD antibodies aren't checked often in celiac and GS but they ought to be with the high prevalence of ataxia, joint and muscle stiffness reported.

 

Frank 

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But what is the treatment? I know that high levels of anti-GAD antibodies with corresponding high blood glucose levels can indicate LADA (type1 diabetes) and then insulin/diet is the treatment.

 

Hi CL,

Anti GAD antibodies presumably would be an autoimmune reaction to ingesting gluten in susceptible people.  The treatment would be a gluten-free diet and for some like myself, IVIG treatment along with a gluten-free diet.  In my mind, I'll be keeping track of this for the rest of my life, perhaps as a potential biological marker of gluten?

The serum levels of GAD antibodies from gluten appear to be much higher than those caused by diabetes.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20456245

 

Frank 

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I would definitely go gluten free and maybe even further by eliminating processed foods or going Paleo. There is a lot to research!

Keep us posted on your progress and let us hope that diet can lower your antibodies and slow/stop the progression!

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