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Ktoda3

Go back on gluten to be tested?

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After almost ten years without it, I now have insurance (yay!).  

So, 4 years ago when I was anemic, loosing hair, exhausted and aching, and with chronic yeast infections, I had to diagnose myself.  After realizing that gluten was the culprit, I've been gluten-free for 3 years.  My hair has grown back, yeast infections are gone, skin is normal. Fatigue and anemia are MUCH, MUCH better but still ongoing; I have to get about 200% DRA of iron to stay above anemia, and daily exercise causes crushing fatigue.  I've assumed this has to do with still-poor nutrient absorption  

Now that I have insurance, is there any benefit to going back on gluten and getting properly diagnosed? CAN I get properly diagnosed without going back on the gluten???  

Thanks for any advice you can offer!

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You can NOT get tested without doing a gluten challenge.

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/what-is-a-gluten-challenge

 


Gluten free Dec. 2011
Dermatitis Herpetiformis

Reynaud's October 2018

Rheumatoid Arthritis October 2018

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You can get a blood test to test your genes. There are certain markers for Celiac Disease. You just have to find a specialist that will know what tests to do and will be willing to do so. I went to an Endocrinologist. If you do not have the genetic markers then the only way to know for sure would be eating gluten again.

Edited by SB&3
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There are something like 2 to 3% of people who don't have the accepted genetic markers who still have dx'd celiac so it's not a total guarantee the if you don't have the normally accepted genes then you can't have celiac. In the same vein, approx. 1/3 of the population carries the accepted celiac genes yet a great deal of them will never have celiac disease. 


Gluten free Dec. 2011
Dermatitis Herpetiformis

Reynaud's October 2018

Rheumatoid Arthritis October 2018

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