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miles2go

Veteran's Day

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I am not what you would call the typical patriotic type (think waaay left), but after seeing "The View" yesterday because we had the day off from work, and watching Elizabeth Hasselbeck have her co-host taste all of the turkey stuffings, I keep wondering how the celiac troops are doing with their dietary needs. Does anyone have first- or second-hand knowledge? :unsure:

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Don't quote me on this by any means, but I seem to remember a thread about a celiac wanting to join the military, but being celiac disqualified them......

Karen


Karen

positive bloodwork, positive biopsy

Celiac, collagenous colitis, hypothyroidism

endometriosis (at age 20)

spinal stenosis (early 20's)

Biopsy August 2006 confirmed complete villous atrophy despite being gluten-free for years and bloodwork within range showing compliance with diet. Doctor has confirmed diagnosis of Refractory Celiac Sprue.

Endoscopy also showed numerous stomach ulcers, have started taking Losec.

Mother to Eileen 13 yrs

Rhiannon 8 yrs

Daniel & Connor 6 yr twin boys......

"Joyfulness keeps the heart and face young. A good laugh makes us better friends with ourselves and everybody around us."

Orison Swett Marden

Laughter is the shortest distance between two people.

-- Victor Borge

"An optimist laughs to forget. A pessimist forgets to laugh."

Tom Nansbury

"Doctor to patient: I have good news and bad news. The good news is that you are not a hypochondriac."

Unknown

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I e-mailed the United States Air Force a bit back and it is considered a disability. However, the man I e-mailed told me that it was up to your health-screener (or something or another like that, it's been a while) that makes the finally decision. I've heard from my Sgt. and Maj from JROTC that it is possible to get a medical waiver. I pray to God that I get that waiver. I'm going to the upcoming Military Acedemy Day in Nashville and I will be talking to anyone I can about if it's possible for me to get in. I'll make sure to post my finding on here.

-Ash


-Diganosed with Celiac's Disease on April 15, 2005.

"Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life"-Picasso

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miles2go:

in general, if you are dx'ed while in the service, you are often kept stateside bc your dietary needs cannot be met while in battle.

if you are dx'ed before, I have heard varying stories. (my father retired this past summer after serving for 38 years in the Navy so I have grown up around the military) most will tell you that chances are, you will not be accepted; if you are, it would only be for certain positions and you would not be sent to say, Iraq/Afghanistan.

(Just what I know, though)

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Wow, thanks for the info!

Meant to add...best of luck to you Ashley, in your endeavors! It sounds like a huge task to be surrounded by so many non-celiacs and not be able to take complete charge of your diet but, everything needs a first.

I'm going back into the denial-mode about this being a disability now. ;)

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Keep us posted Ashley. I hope you ultimately get accepted.

My dad was a Marine. I would consider it an honor if either of my children (one girl, one boy) were to want to serve their country in the military. Stateside or overseas.

As common as celiac and gluten intolerance is, I believe that it will be something that is worked with by the military eventually. Holding down the fort at home is important.

Nancy


The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person who is doing it.

~Chinese Proverb

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Earlier this year in the publication from the CSA a military fellow (who was up there in ranks) wrote an article and he said he was the only celiac in his position in military and that the armed services will not willingly take a celiac due as they will probably be unable to feed them properly if they are sent overseas; and they can't take that chance and the expense of training someone and not being able to use their services anywhere but stateside. He also mentioned that if a trainee within first few years came down with celiac disease diagnosis they would most likely be medically discharged; length of time in service improved your chances for being kept stateside.

I asked my ex-Navy hubby what his opinion was and he felt very strongly that it would be too much of a challenge to live gluten-free in active duty whether overseas on on board ship during active military engagement. You'd be too dependent on supply ships that may or may not come on time with the food rations which would include the gluten-free rations. You might then be forced to eat gluten or not eat at all.


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

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Hi. I'm in the Air National Guard. This is the state component of the Air Force. This past weekend, when I went in for my annual physical assessment, I was put on profile. This means that they marked me as undeployable, and therefore, unpayable. I can't serve until I get a negative diagnosis for gluten sensitivity. I have been in for 4 1/2 years.

The doctor I went in to see was going to let me through and allow me to just talk to my commander about it and have an understanding, but on second thought, he sent me over to the doctor in the room next door because he was a pediatric GI doctor. The first doctor did acknowledge that there could be some liability for me if he allowed me to pass through. The military doesn't like it if it appears you've been trying to keep a secret.

In all actuality, "gluten sensitivity" is not on the list of unwaiverable conditions, but celiac disease is. I'm not certain I have celiac, but I'm certain I'm gluten sensitive, so I thouht I might be able to slip past the radar. The second doctor (GI doctor) said that, for all practical purposes, they're the same. So he put me on profile.

Now I'm supposed to go see a civilian doctor, pay for the diagnosis all myself (I have no insurance), and if I don't do this, I get kicked out. If I do pay for the diagnosis and get a positive diagnosis, I get kicked out. I don't know for sure what I'm going to do, but I'm leaning toward NOT going to see a doctor for diagnosis at this time. I have a new job, I'm in the red, and my only income is commissions only. There's a learning curve, so I'm not making anything yet. I just can't afford to (a) pay for this right now or (B) get sick and miss time on the job.

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