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givingthanx

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About givingthanx

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  1. Crazy thing! read this: http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/HLA-DQB1 I have HLA-DQB1 0501 and 06**. inhave started suspecting the 06** is an 0602 because of the problems I have. You know, they always tout DQ2 and DQ8 when they talk about celiac disease so I figured I probably had non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Well, been reading over this 0602 info available on the Internet, and it keeps saying DQB1 0602 is associated with celiac disease!!! as the info atbthe link above will tell you, an alternate name for the DQB1 0602 gene is CELIAC1!!! how crazy is that? I do have a lot of dizziness - orthostatic hypotension. I also have issues that appear to be related to hypertension. I've even started to look into following a diabetic diet in addition to the gluten. I have neuropathy issues as well. You might look into LADA, a strange atypical type of diabetes (usually thin people) that usually has adult onset, also associated with 0602. it appears to me, after much reading, that it is a separate type from types 1 or 2 with some similarities to both - thus sometimes called type 1.5. Serious stuff. Hard to get a diagnosis because physicians don't recognize it. But people who have it need to figure it out because it leads to complete lack of insulin production in the body. A pubmed article I read seemed to indicate that a study showed a gluten-free diet seems to delay its progression. a person with LADA will absolutely require multiple insulin shots daily once the thing has run its course. Good luck. I'm about to try and research some (google) on HLA-DQB1, atypical celiac disease - to see if my symptoms line up. This is all very intriguing to me.
  2. Anybody on here heard of a reaction to tapioca including acne and fatigue?
  3. Hi, I was wondering how everything turned out with you and the ANG. Are you still in? Or did you get a medical discharge? You can email me at jaimealbertson@comcast.net if you'd like.

  4. What do these eczema patches that people are talking about look like? I've been getting brown patches of brown leathery skin - on my feet and on my knees. The patches have defined edges. Wrinkly, leathery, hard skin. Not itchy. My mom, who I suspect has celiac (she's got a ton of symptoms) also has these patches.
  5. Thanks for that post, Burdee. I'll stop eating it. Too bad, because it tastes really good with agave nectar. It's definitely not worth it, though. It affected my job yesterday.
  6. I'm starting to wonder if Nutty Flax cereal is truly gluten free. The last couple times I had it, I got bad brain fog. I can't be certain it's the Nutty Flax, but it seems a super strange coincidence. There was a couple weeks in between the episodes.
  7. The National Guard can be, and has been, called on to do all the same functions as active duty. In fact, we are being used in large numbers in the current conflict. Our base, which is solely an Air National Guard base, actually had to train additional security forces personnel because they were sent over in large numbers to the Middle East. I actually tried to volunteer for security forces (my career field is combat communications), but they had cut off funding at that point. Besides that, my unit has been deployed to the Middle East and will most likely be deployed again in the near future. Anyone who is deployed, regardless of their job classification, is prepared and trained to deal with some level of combat. All combat communications personnel (of which I am one), including guard members, go to a special school to train for direct combat. They give us M-16s fitted with lasers, and we do very real war games where there are well-trained aggressors with night vision and high powered scopes attacking us. A lot of these "aggressors" have had war experience. They train us to dig fox holes, about "friendly fire," how to sweep out snipers, how to keep moving because a moving target is a more difficult target. They train us in how to address various outsiders who might try to gain access to our area and when to use force and not use force, as well as how and when to detain and/or disarm aggressors. The aggressors sometimes stormed our camp, and we had to respond. We could get "killed" and "wounded" (the lasers could set off sounds that would indicate a kill or a "near miss"). Some of us were captured. They teach us how to survive on our own without supply - how to test for poison in possible foodstuffs to be found in the wild, how to treat medical situations without medical supplies. Besides the fact that they put so much effort and expense in training us in how to avoid bullets and be prepared to resist aggressors, my military would not be throwing me out of the military if I was only a bullet-catcher to them. But they're in process of throwing me out because of gluten sensitivity. It remains to be seen whether or not I'll actually be cast out, but I think I will be. I've at least been put on a temporary hold from any service. And that's because they don't just want a bullet-catcher. They want someone who can be highly functional and capable of repelling the enemy or supporting others who are repelling the enemy in those critical moments. They do not want dead weight. They can't afford dead weight. Dead weight bullet-catchers lose battles, which is why there are medical and psychological ceriteria which determine who can and can't be in our American military, which is quite frankly currently the premier military in the world. The reason we haven't dealt with much in the way of attacks on our land is because our government has largely had a policy of keeping the war off our shores. This is not a mean thing. This is a responsible policy used to protect our people. If we allowed people to take the fight here, our people would be in more danger. I don't think it's wrong for us to do what we can to keep the fight off our shores. We have a very, very efficient homeland defense - though not impermiable, for sure, it is quite effective. If it wasn't, we would have surely experienced a much greater direct loss by now. Where are you from, by the way? The UK? But I diverge from celiac disease, so I'll stop here.
  8. Hi. I'm in the Air National Guard. This is the state component of the Air Force. This past weekend, when I went in for my annual physical assessment, I was put on profile. This means that they marked me as undeployable, and therefore, unpayable. I can't serve until I get a negative diagnosis for gluten sensitivity. I have been in for 4 1/2 years. The doctor I went in to see was going to let me through and allow me to just talk to my commander about it and have an understanding, but on second thought, he sent me over to the doctor in the room next door because he was a pediatric GI doctor. The first doctor did acknowledge that there could be some liability for me if he allowed me to pass through. The military doesn't like it if it appears you've been trying to keep a secret. In all actuality, "gluten sensitivity" is not on the list of unwaiverable conditions, but celiac disease is. I'm not certain I have celiac, but I'm certain I'm gluten sensitive, so I thouht I might be able to slip past the radar. The second doctor (GI doctor) said that, for all practical purposes, they're the same. So he put me on profile. Now I'm supposed to go see a civilian doctor, pay for the diagnosis all myself (I have no insurance), and if I don't do this, I get kicked out. If I do pay for the diagnosis and get a positive diagnosis, I get kicked out. I don't know for sure what I'm going to do, but I'm leaning toward NOT going to see a doctor for diagnosis at this time. I have a new job, I'm in the red, and my only income is commissions only. There's a learning curve, so I'm not making anything yet. I just can't afford to (a) pay for this right now or ( get sick and miss time on the job.
  9. I certainly understand you didn't mean any harm , but I must beg to differ about the job of a military person being to take a bullet. Our job is not to take a bullet. Our job is to do our best to avoid taking the bullet so we can take out as many of their guys as possible. That's why our government spends so much money training us and on our protective equipment. I do agree with your statement, "If you don't like it, don't sign." With that said, an update on my situation: As stated in a prior post, I'm in the Air National Guard. This is the state component of the Air Force. This past weekend, when I went in for my annual physical assessment, I was put on profile. This means that they marked me as undeployable, and therefore, unpayable. I can't serve until I get a negative diagnosis for gluten sensitivity. The doctor I went in to see was going to let me through and allow me to just talk to my commander about it and have an understanding, but on second thought, he sent me over to the doctor in the room next door because he was a pediatric GI doctor. In all actuality, "gluten sensitivity" is not on the list of unwaiverable conditions, but celiac disease is. I'm not certain I have celiac, but I'm certain I'm gluten sensitive, so I thouht I might be able to slip past the radar. This doctor said that, for all practical purposes, they're the same. So he put me on profile. Now I'm supposed to go see a civilian doctor, pay for the diagnosis all myself (I have no insurance), and if I don't do this, I get kicked out. If I do pay for the diagnosis and get a positive diagnosis, I get kicked out. I don't know for sure what I'm going to do, but I'm leaning toward NOT going to see a doctor for diagnosis at this time. I have a new job, and my only income is commissions only. There's a learning curve, so I'm not making anything yet. I just can't afford to (a) pay for this right now or ( get sick and miss time on the job.
  10. Hello everyone. I have a neice who is severly casein sensitive. I want to explain logically to her mother that she should test her for gluten sensitivity, since it does run in the family. Does gluten sensitivity cause casein sensitivity? What, biologically, is happening? Why are they linked? Do you have any references for me? Thanks! Mary
  11. You're right about the difficulty in getting a diagnosis! Check out this horror story I got off a glutenfreeforum profile signature off the bottom of a post: celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45 Blood tested and repeatedly negative Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002 [which means they did an endoscopy and finally saw signs of celiac after 45 years of symptoms] Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias and arthritis All resoved with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002 Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006
  12. Michelle, I did a search on the red flush you get from alcohol. Weird! Most of the results came up as "Asian Flush." One person said an allergy to sulfites can cause it. Everything else talked about this genetic thing that is predominant in Asians, and possibly Jewish people. It has something to do with an enzyme that's supposed to break down something in the alcohol... if I understood it right. I just skimmed the info. I wonder if complications from celiac/gluten sensitivity can cause it by depleting the enzymes? I have no idea. Check out these links: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_flush_reaction http://abclocal.go.com/ktrk/story?section=...&id=3620414 http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/2327.html A lot of your other symptoms really DO sound like gluten sensitivity. Of course, you already knew that. I really feel for you. It sounds like you really are having a tough time. You talked about being very flexible. Did you have late developmental markers as a kid? Did you walk late, talk late, etc? There's something called hypotonia. People who have it are super flexible. A hypotonic person can have poor spacial awareness - easily bumps into things and is poor at ball sports, etc. It's not actually a disorder in itself, but it generally indicates that there is probably a disorder that has caused it. I guess that means it's more like a symptom. It's associated with Ehlers-Danlos, like you mentioned. It's also associated with celiac. When information indicated something can be a symptom of celiac, I tend to assume it can also be a symptom of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. I'm actually a member of a hypotonia listserve because I discovered I have it. Have you heard of peripheral neuropathy? It sounds like what you're experiencing with the numbness in fingers and toes. Symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are highly variable, so as you look at the sites below, don't think you have to have all the symptoms to be experiencing it. http://millercenter.uchicago.edu/learnabou...outpn/symptoms/ http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/periphe...lneuropathy.htm Below is a table I got from http://jnnp.bmj.com/cgi/reprint/72/5/560.pdf It appears that 29 out of a group of 83 people with celiac disease had peripheral neuropathy. Table 1 Neurology of coeliac disease (based on a review of 35 papers of single or multiple case reports from 1964 to 2000) Total number of patients 83 Male to female ratio 44:39 Mean age 48 Neurological diagnosis Ataxia 29 Peripheral neuropathy 29 Myopathy 13 Ataxia with myoclonus 9 Myelopathy 4 Dementia (usually with additional features) 6 I also got this from the same article: Only one third of the patients with neurological disorders associated with gluten sensitivity have villous atrophy on duodenal biopsy. Even some with biochemical markers of malabsorption such as low serum vitamin B12, low red cell folate, or vitamin D concentrations had normal conventional duodenal histology.17 These cases may illustrate the patchy nature of bowel involvement in coeliac disease and the inaccurate interpretation of duodenal biopsies by inexperienced histopathologists...There are, however, patients where the immunological disorder is primarily directed at the nervous system with little or no damage to the gut.
  13. Hey Michelle. It certainly sounds like you've got something autoimmune going on!!! What other symptoms do you have? You said you don't feel healthy. Are you fatigued? I put in three of your symptoms - hyperpigmentation, hair loss, and moodiness at this site: http://symptoms.wrongdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/ And I got these possible results: Addison's Disease, Polycystic ovary syndrome It's always possible you have more than one condition that could complicate diagnosis. But both of those conditions, apparently, are known to cause all three of those symptoms. Look at the back of your neck in the mirror. Is the crease in your neck a darker color? Look at your gums. Are there dark spots on your gums? Check out this site on Addison's: http://endocrine.niddk.nih.gov/pubs/addison/addison.htm What's getting worse about your skin? Also, does your hair come out in round patches, or is it thinning? Are you sure you're gluten sensitive? You might be. And you might have other stuff in addition. But it's possible going off gluten might not solve all of this stuff. It wouldn't hurt to try, though. It sounds like you need different doctors!!!! Maybe an endocrinologist would be best.
  14. Hi Michelle. Vitiligo is also associated with Addison's disease. No, celiac doesn't necessarily make someone pale, but it is one of the common possible symptoms. I'm very pale myself. What do you think about EnteroLab (http://enterolab.com)? They do testing to determine if a person is gluten sensitive. I believe they can also test for casein sensitivity. I have only had their gene test because I don't have the money (yet) to do anything else. I am gluten free now. Going gluten-free removed some serious symptoms I'd had for a few weeks, and it also removed a couple of long-standing symptoms. A couple weeks later, not being totally sure I was gluten sensitive, I took communion at church and got sick again.
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