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2Boys4Me

Gluten Free Oatmeal Cookies

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I made the following recipe the other day. Both kids love them. My older son (NGF) has been bugging me to make oatmeal cookies, but I made them gluten-free so I wouldn't have all-purpose flour floating around the kitchen.

Gramma's Dad's Cookies

2 cups white sugar

1 cup brown sugar

2 cups margarine

2 eggs

2 cups coconut

2 1/2 cups oatmeal

3 cups flour

2 teaspoons baking soda

2 teaspoons baking powder

make into balls and if you want, flatten with a fork dipped in sugar...Bake at 350 for 7 to 10 minutes...Makes lots of cookies..

my notes:

I just dropped the dough onto the cookie sheet with a spoon, it was a bit sloppy to try to roll into a ball.

I used Lara's rolled oats and Lara's oat flour (AKA Cream Hill Estates - from Quebec). I used one cup oat flour and the other 2 cups I used Carol Fenster's sorghum/corn flour blend.

1 1/2 cups sorghum flour

1/1/2 cups potato starch

1 cup tapioca flour

1/2 cup corn flour (or chestnut flour or bean flour)

They didn't quite look done at 10 minutes, so I baked for 12 and then they crisped up afterwards, so they were a bit over done. I'll stick with the 10 minutes next time. I don't like coconut at all, but you can't really taste it, so it's okay for people who aren't crazy about coconut.

Also when this says "makes lots of cookies" it's right! I had a tupperware container full and three 1 litre zip bags full to put in the freezer.

I got the recipe from my mother-in-law, so I suppose it's her dad's recipe.

Because of the whole oats controversy, I only let Ty have two a day. He has not reported any stomachaches or anything, so for those of you who can tolerate oats, you may want to give this recipe a try.

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I do know that the protein in oats is very similar to gluten, but that oats don't actually contain gluten. I know that commercial brands like Quaker are not recommended because they are grown/transported/processed with gluten containing grains. I know that some celiacs have no problem consuming small quantities of certifed gluten-free oats and that others can't tolerate gluten-free oats.

My son's GI doctor and dietician both agreed that since he's been on the diet for two years that if he chooses he can have the certified gluten-free oats in moderation - 1/4 cup a day 3 or 4 times a week. I am using certifed gluten-free oats and oat flour from Cream Hill Estates.

http://www.Lame Advertisement.com/en_about.php There's the link to the website.

About Us

Cream Hill Estates is a Montreal-based company that produces and distributes pure rolled oats, oat flour and whole oat kernels (groats). We offer a purity guarantee on the products we sell and they are kosher.

Our goal is to help people with celiac disease (celiac disease) and wheat sensitivities by providing guaranteed pure oats that are free from contamination with wheat, barley, rye and other grains.

Both our products and our manufacturing process are unique in the North American market. We are involved in the entire production from planting through to distribution.

We define the standards for growing and manufacturing our oats, meeting or exceeding the Canadian Celiac Association's purity definitions and guidelines.

We contract directly with seed growers to grow our oats, especially with those who themselves have celiac disease or have a relative with it. We feel they understand the importance of meeting our standards.

We monitor the quality of our processes and oat products.

We wholesale and retail our oat products.

Our Community Pledge

Cream Hill Estates is dedicated to helping those with celiac disease through:

Research

A portion of our sales is donated to celiac disease research.

Product development

We share our knowledge with organizations and groups that are looking for new food products for people with celiac disease and wheat sensitivities.

Education

Our Resources section features some of the latest advancements in celiac disease with a focus on the best dietary management.

Oats and Celiac Disease

Researchers have been studying the safety of oats for people with celiac disease for over 20 years.

We now know that the majority of people with celiac disease can safely eat oats

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I do know that the protein in oats is very similar to gluten, but that oats don't actually contain gluten. I know that commercial brands like Quaker are not recommended because they are grown/transported/processed with gluten containing grains. I know that some celiacs have no problem consuming small quantities of certifed gluten-free oats and that others can't tolerate gluten-free oats.

My son's GI doctor and dietician both agreed that since he's been on the diet for two years that if he chooses he can have the certified gluten-free oats in moderation - 1/4 cup a day 3 or 4 times a week. I am using certifed gluten-free oats and oat flour from Cream Hill Estates.

http://www.Lame Advertisement.com/en_about.php There's the link to the website.

Sorry if this comes off as a bit harsh, but I had the feeling you were judging me on my decision to let my son eat oatmeal cookies once in a while.

My extremely sensitive and symptomatic Celiac daughter can consume the Cream Hill Estates oats in the form of a bowl of oatmeal or oatmeal cookies without any difficulty. gluten-free oats provide a much needed form of fibre in a gluten free diet.

BTW I use the oatmeal cookie recipe in Annalise Roberts' cookbook (gluten free classics I believe the name is - it's a white book with a picture of a slice of cake on it in any event) and they are hands down the best oatmeal cookies I have ever tasted in my life (gluten or no gluten). We add raisins to the recipe but might add chocolate chips next time for fun. Well worth a try - they are chewy in the middle and crispy on the edges and delicious all the time!

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