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kaylabobayla

London

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ok so during spring break me and my orchestra are going to london to perform in symphony hall and i wanted to know where and what i could eat there

like restaraunts??

and like im traveling there from vegas and like what can i pack with me on the plane??

if anyone has advice let me know


KAYL A

celiac for some time now

caesin free too :(

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When I went to Spain I took fruit and breakfast bars on the plane with me. Not all countries let you take fresh foods into them and you'll have to leave them on the plane or in the airport after landing.

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If you search this forum, you will find information about London. My understanding is that finding gluten-free there is much easier than here.

I don't have time to search for it right now since I'm leaving shortly to go out of town. If you can't find this information, I'll look for it when I get back.

I've done some research myself because I'm going there during spring break, too, to visit my daughter, who is spending the year at UCL.

Some airlines have gluten-free meal options.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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Here's a website that should be useful:

http://www.coeliac.co.uk/glutenfree_living/94.asp

If you search, you can find threads where the UK is discussed. But I don't know that any of the information goes beyond what you can find on the above site.

The daughter of someone on a different forum just came back from England and reportedly had no difficulty at all finding gluten-free food there.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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ok so during spring break me and my orchestra are going to london to perform in symphony hall and i wanted to know where and what i could eat there

like restaraunts??

and like im traveling there from vegas and like what can i pack with me on the plane??

if anyone has advice let me know

I have been to London many times and the British are much more Celiac savvy than their American counterparts. There are many small restaurants and eating establishments in the city and I have never had a problem finding a good meal. The English also post their menu's around the entrance to restaurants so you can get a good idea of what they serve before going in and committing yourself. There is also a new Whole Foods Market in the Kensington area of London (central) so you may be able to find some gluten-free snacks there. The downside is that the exchange rate is horrible right now so eating out will cost you more but the food is excellent.

Virgin Atlantic also offers gluten-free meals on their flights, and I know they fly out of Vegas. They are the best airline to fly to Europe and the food is good too. Excellent service!

Relax and have a wonderful time...it's one of the world's best cities to visit!

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Call the airline and request a gluten free meal. This request should be made as far in advance as possible.

I have brought the following in my carry on luggage an airplane:

Cold pre-cooked chicken - any cooked meat that can be eaten cold will work

Vegetables that can be eaten - raw carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, slice tomatoes, etc


Phyllis

Gluten Free - 30 years

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England has much better labeling laws than the US so regular grocery stores have lots of food with a gluten-free logo. They also have tons of great tasting sweets! I bring cookies back with me because they're much better there.

I usually fly American Airlines. They have gluten-free meals. Just watch out because they have a habit of including a five-grain cracker with the meal with four of the grains being WBRO! Writing a letter to them about this issue is on my list of things to do...

I always take a batch of those easy peanut butter cookies (PB, egg, sugar and vanilla). They're a bit crumbly but they last the whole trip and I find one of those is enough to keep me happy when I'm really hungry.


Gluten-Free since September 15, 2005.

Peanut-Free since July 2006.

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England has much better labeling laws than the US so regular grocery stores have lots of food with a gluten-free logo. They also have tons of great tasting sweets! I bring cookies back with me because they're much better there.

Better is subjective...

In the UK gluten-free doesn't mean gluten-free, it means less than xppm gluten.

If you just do a gluten-free lite diet then this might be OK, otherwise you need to be very careful... for instance dextrine and malto-dextrine can both be derived from wheat in the UK and the label still say gluten-free.


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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cool thanks for the info guys

ima be staying at the sunborn yacht hotel so if anyone knows if its gluten free friendly let me know

thanks


KAYL A

celiac for some time now

caesin free too :(

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If you are near tesco or sainsburys supermarkets. you should be able to get gluten free food quite easily. They offer bread, cakes biscuits and the labelling here is excellent, if a product contains gluten it should be marked on the label.

Also if you like spanish food the chain, La Tasca, offer lots of gluten free options, I;m sure there must be a least one in London.

Enjoy your trip.

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so i just got my new itinerary and these are the restaurants we'll be eating at

The Fox

Ivory house

The Albert

The Prince of Wales

anyone have any info on these places? like menus and if theyre safe?

thanks


KAYL A

celiac for some time now

caesin free too :(

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You could just contact them yourself. That way you can keep a steady contact the whole time and feel better prepared when eating there. Plus, salads are always an option!

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Hi, I live in London and have just been diagnosed with Coeliac and can happily say that you should be absolutely fine.

Britain is covered under EU law requiring thorough and clear labeling on food products, so the majority of things should state Gluten Free or have a little symbol of grain in a striked circle - no grain here!

In smaller stores and newsagents you may have to spend some time rummaging around the specific items that you want reading the labels, but most the bigger supermarket names (Tesco, Sainsburys and the more pricier Marks & Spencer) have small innercity stores all around the centre of London, often called Express stores or 'Tesco Metro'. These should all have a dedicated 'Free From' aisle or at least a small collection of shelves with some options grouped together for you.

Snack-wise London has it sorted, most crisps (sorry, chips!) are naturally gluten free but most of these larger stores always seem to have a ready supply of different biscuits, chewy bars and cakes. You will have to be a bit careful with chocolate bars, as I'm sure you do at home, there will be some but I haven't noticed any of them shouting Gluten Free on the labels and the text is often so tiny you may have to spend some time sifting through them!

Congratulations on the trip though, you will have an awesome time!

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