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blondebombshell

Quinoa Help

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never had this before but am looking for something to eat for breakfast post-gym. never cooked or tasted it!

any good recipes/recomendations on how to cook it?

when i look for ideas it seems its a dinner thing. is it?


- gluten free since August 2007

- endoscopy came back negative for celiac in December 2007

- bloodwork confirms egg allergy

- allergy testing confirms only banana, apple, melon, egg and environmental allergies

i get hives anywhere on my waist down and less bloating/constipation when i do not eat wheat.

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never had this before but am looking for something to eat for breakfast post-gym. never cooked or tasted it!

any good recipes/recomendations on how to cook it?

when i look for ideas it seems its a dinner thing. is it?

I haven't experimented with Quinoa much but I do cook it like oat meal and eat it with honey and milk like oatmeal. I think it has a similar texture and taste. It is very filling and sticks with you.

Good luck with it and I will look forward to hearing what others do with it.

Debbie

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You can eat quinoa for any meal. It can take a variety of additions or seasoning. I'm sure you can find lots of recipes online. Or you can use it as a sub for rice in any recipe.

For breakfast, I like to put 1 cup of gluten-free grains (it could be just quinoa, something else, or a mixture) to 3 1/2 cups water in my crockpot at night, and set it at low. In the morning, I add 1/2 cup of nondairy milk, 1/2 cup of dried fruit, and any seasoning that appeals (I seem to like a little maple syrup right now). Then cook another 30 minutes. This makes enough for 3 meals. You can double this recipe, too. Then other mornings you just need to microwave and there you go.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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If you have a Wild Oats near you they have a free Bulk Food Guide that is really helpful to have on hand.

It gives info about the items that are sold in the bulk department, grains, flours, legumes, etc and tips and instructions on how to cook them.

Millet is included in the guide. It can be made as a cereal/porridge, a side grain pilaf type dish, and millet cakes just to name a few.

I haven't used millet a whole lot, but I found it tasted best in the pressure cooker, a little scary to use but once I got the hang of it it was easy.

I just followed the guide with the grain to water ratio appropriate for the pressure cooker, threw in some sliced onion, shredded carrot, and some ghee, makes a very tasty side dish.

You can take this cooked mixture and add egg and a little millet flour to make millet cakes by browning them in a skillet with a little olive oil.

If you prepare it like oatmeal it makes a great hot cereal, top with fruit, chopped nuts or nut butter, or yogurt, the possibilities are endless.

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I take (peeled) apples and boil them in some water, and once they're applsauce-y but still a bit chunky, I add enough water to equal the amount you would use for your serving of quinoa, and cook the quinoa in that. Doesn't need any sweetener, tastes delicious.


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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Here are some recipies.

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?s...7&hl=Grains

http://www.vegalicious.org/2007/02/22/sunshine-quinoa-salad/

Here's one from Living Without magazine that I have tried and liked. It makes a lot.

Farm Fresh Quinoa Salad

1 c. quinoa, rinsed well. Bring 2 c. water to a boil and add quinoa. Cover. reduce heat. Simmer 15 min. or until water is absorbed. Remove from heat. Fluff with a fork.

In a large bowl, whisk:

3 Tb. lime or lemon juice

3 Tb. olive oil

2 Tb. chopped cilantro

2 Tb. chopped basil

1/2 tsp. salt

1/4 tsp. pepper

Add cooked quinoa and,

1 bunch green onions, sliced

1 c. sliced celery

1 c. fresh corn

1 c. red bell pepper, chopped

2 tomatoes

2 cloves garlic or 1 shallot, minced


Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11

Son: ADHD '06,

neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07

ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08

ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08

Gluten-free-Feb. '09

other food allergies

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If you're meaning quinoa flakes, then yes, that's like oatmeal. But if you're meaning just plain quinoa, I like to make it with chicken broth. I think it's a 2:1 ratio, so, 1 cup quinoa to 2 cups chicken broth. It's reallllly good this way, I won't eat it any other way.

For quinoa flakes, you can do cinnamon and agave (or maple syrup) with some apples. It's a great breakfast.


Dairy/Casein Free- March 2007

Gluten Free- May 2007

Soy Free- August 2007

Sugar Free- January 2008

Starch Free- January 2008

Egg Free (again!)- February 2008

Sulfur Free- May 2008

Dx'd Lyme Disease and co-infections- December 2007

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