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Chris28806

New Minnesotan

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I wasn't exactly clear on where new member introductions are supposed to be posted but I figure this would be the best spot.

I was diagnosed with celiac about 4 years ago during sophmore year when I was standing at a staggering 4'6. After being diagnosed I went on and off a gluten free diet, due to seveir frustrations from the restrictions this diet has. After a few years of not caring what I ate or drank I've come to a road where I can only go gluten free.

By the grace of god I managed to get up to 5'4 and weigh about 150lbs. (4 years of weight training). I am hitting a wall now and now notice a huge change in my attitude. I am much more irrateable and have a very hard time coping with stress then ever before. This is a big step for me and am looking for advice from all the long time gluten free eaters.

Due to current financial issues (college) I am unable to purchase the right ingrediants to make basic meals. Fortunatly, my mom also a celiac survivior is able to make bread for me. I eat a high calorie, carb, and protein diet and would like to keep it that way when going gluten free.

I'm a real simple eater and can eat the same things for months and months. I have been looking around for sometime for a general list of simple grocerys I can purchase at a local Cub Foods but no luck yet.

Can anyone help me with a list of simple grocerys I can purchase?

Thank you for taking the time to read this

Chris

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Hello from another Minnesotan! Where are you going to school? You mentioned that your mom makes bread for you - are you living at home, or do you bring it with you? If you are living on campus, do you have a kitchen? Are you able to cook for yourself?

The most economical way to eat is always to cook from scratch if you possibly can. Rice and beans are a super protein, carb combo that is very cheap. Grits or hot rice cereal is going to be cheaper than cold cereal. Eggs are pretty cheap, too. Potatoes are another inexpensive carb option.

But it's hard to get very specific w/o knowing your food prep options and limitations. Can you tell us a little more?

(My son is a sophomore in high school who was recently diagnosed. I'm determined to teach him to cook before he goes off on his own, because I know he's going to have the same issues! ;) )

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I currently am enrolled in a Fire Tech program in Duluth, I'm originally from the cities. As of now I'm living with 2 roomates (neither celiac) in a house with an awsome kitchen. In a givin day I will eat between 6 to 9 small meals (chicken breast, tuna, rice, etc.) I know how to cook it's just I'm always paranoid about cross contaimination. I perfer very simple "snacks" with the occasional 1 lbs. burger and potatoes.

School poses another problem. We have a kitchen to our disposal but I only have maximum of 45 min. between classes. I am generally out at school between 3 and 8 hours a day. So I just like to bring again just smaller and little to no preperation foods.

I'm kind of a bone head when it comes to what I can and cannot eat simply because I never took it seriously untill I actually started seeing and feeling the effects of eating gluten. So bare with me.

In a givin morning I eat, large bowl of Flavorite Quick Oats, eggs, and soon gluten free protein shakes

During the day I generally have 2 to 3 cans of tuna, a few cups of rice, and multiple penut butter sandwiches. At night most of the time is a big burger with marble jack shredded cheese and Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ sauce (I know is gluten free). Then bed time I generally have large bowl of cottage cheese, eggs, and soon to be gluten free protein shakes. There may be a chicken breast thrown into the mix at sometimes but flavored with vegitable oil and Sweet Baby Rays BBQ.

Please give me some insite on what I should change or other easy foods I can consume. Until then I will be researching. Thank you for reading and responding Beth.

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Welcome! I'm another Minnesotan living in Minneapolis.

You should eliminated the Oatmeal. You must assume oatmeal is contaminated UNLESS it specifically says gluten-free (and you're not going to fine gluten-free oats at Cub Foods!) Non contaminated oatmeal still causes some celiacs to react and some not to because the protein is similar to gluten.

Try getting a mini-thermos. You can keep warm foods in there like soup or chili to take to class. Cub has a pretty decent ethic foods selection. They've got Thai Kitchen imitation ramen noodles, some good Indian and Thai food, 4lb bags of rice flour for $2. I notice there's not a lot of veggies in your diet. What about fruit that's easy to take to class? I love eating a giant bowl of steamed veggies. I also take a salad for lunch everyday.

Ok, I've got to run so that's it for now.


Gluten-Free since September 15, 2005.

Peanut-Free since July 2006.

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Fruits and veggies are your friend -- no danger of gluten. You can get bags of frozen broccoli and cauliflower on sale for a buck. Sweet potatoes/yams make a nice change from potatoes (and have lots more vitamins).

I bought a slow cooker ($20 at Target) and have been having fun with it. You can fill it up and cook while you're at school or overnight. Some stew meat, carrots, onions & potatoes with some broth (make sure the broth is gluten-free -- most are not!) and you get a big pile of stew. Or you can stew a chicken. Chili (3-4 lbs ground beef, a few cans of beans, a can of tomatoes, some water & spices) works great. Last week I bought 3 lbs of pork shoulder at Rainbow for $3.00, and put it in the slow cooker with some onions and a cup of Sweet Baby Ray's and made a big mass of BBQ pork. It was great with corn.

Also, if you haven't done so, double check your cottage cheese. That was one of the last places I found hidden gluten!

Gotta go -- this thread is making me hungry!

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Hi Chris,

Here's a thought: what if your Mom could go shopping at the Whole Foods here in the cities for you. They have a whole list available right at the customer service desk of all the foods in the store that are gluten-free. They also have a handy little system of putting green gluten-free tags right next to the price tag on the shelving units - so you can see at a glance what products are g.f. Maybe Mom could come for a visit, or next time you are in town here you could stock up on things like snacks to take to class etc. Trader Joes is a great one too, as you already mentioned. The big mainstream chain stores aren't as easy to navigate gluten-free - sorry!

Kritter

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