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Guhlia

Tori's Enterolab Results

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Okay guys, I'm going to leave this to the experts... I'm confused with these results because we thought for sure that she had Celiac and this shows she doesn't? The double gene thing - does that mean that both my husband and I carry the gene for Celiac Disease or just the gene for gluten sensitivity? Should my husband get tested? What are the odds that both of us have it? Will Tori likely develop Celiac later in life? How often should we retest? I have so many questions and I feel like I really don't have any answers now. Could her being gluten light have affected these scores? We put her back on gluten (snack time at school - two snacks a day most days) before we did the tests. Almost every single day after school she tells me she had gluten. I trust her on that, she knows what's gluten free and what isn't. Could that score of 9 be affected by being gluten light? Somebody please help me sort this out.

A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 9 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 7 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score <300 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 8 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0201

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,2 (Subtype 2,2)

Interpretation of Fecal Antigliadin IgA: Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was below the upper limit of normal, indicating there is no ongoing gluten sensitivity. If you have any syndrome or symptoms known to be associated with gluten sensitivity, it is recommended that you continue a strict gluten-free diet. If you have no syndrome or symptoms associated with gluten sensitivity, you may opt to stay gluten-free as a purely preventive measure.

Interpretation of Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA: The level of intestinal IgA antibodies to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase was below the upper limit of normal, and hence, there is no evidence of a gluten-induced autoimmune reaction.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal.

Interpretation of Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: HLA-DQB1 gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of the main genes that predispose to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302. Having two copies of a gluten sensitive or celiac gene means that each of your parents and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac disease may be more severe.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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I would see if i could get her in for an blood test and just see if she is Iga deficient, that could be why the scores are so low.

Your hubby must also have the dq2 gene, hence why she has to copies.

Ill post more in a bit hubby is home for lunch lol

paula


gluten, casein and soy free

on low carb/low sugar diet

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I would see if i could get her in for an blood test and just see if she is Iga deficient, that could be why the scores are so low.

Your hubby must also have the dq2 gene, hence why she has to copies.

Ill post more in a bit hubby is home for lunch lol

paula

We need to keep all of this off of the books. Is there a reputable mail order place similar to Enterolab to get her tested for Iga deficiency?


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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We need to keep all of this off of the books. Is there a reputable mail order place similar to Enterolab to get her tested for Iga deficiency?

why does it need to be kept off the books?


~~~~Gluten Free since 9/2004~~~~~~

Friends may come and go but Sillies are Forever!!!!!!!

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we have private insurance and its barely affordable as it is. they raise our insurance when we just get a cold. I can't imagine how high their insurance would be if Tori had a real issue.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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She is double DQ2 - so both you and your DH must carry the right kind of HLA (human leukocyte antigen). However, I think about 30% of the population in North America does carry at least one copy of DQ2. The fact that she is "homozygous" for DQ2 means that if she does develop Celiac, she might be at risk for having a tougher case.

I agree with previous poster that I would be curious about whether she is IGA deficient. The test for this is sometimes called Total IGA, or Serum IGA or Quant IGA. Or spelled out, it might have a name like Immunoglobulin A, Serum, Quantitative. I do not know a place online to order this test. It does not diagnose Celiac Disease, but it is its own condition that could help point you in the direction of Celiac.

Being double DQ2, it certainly won't hurt her to avoid gluten and may actually prevent a lot of problems down the road even if she does not currently have Celiac Disease. DQ2 can also go along with Type 1 (Juvenile) Diabetes. Both my husband and I have gluten sensitivity and/or Celiac (hubby just recently discovered though positive TTG test and years of symptoms). Our three children all have some degree of gluten issues. I have had one tested (middle son) who was DQ2, DQ4 (so he picked up one gene from one parent but also picked up one of our non-Celiac genes). His Enterolab IgA antibody tests were through the roof (near 100 on gluten and dairy) - but he obviously was not IgA deficient. However, I have not had my oldest gene tested - he has a positive Celiac Diagnosis through conventional testing, and he was very sick for years and has been hard to "cure" even on a gluten-free diet - I suspect he may be double DQ2.

Best wishes - positive dietary response is the most important thing, in the end.

April

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we have private insurance and its barely affordable as it is. they raise our insurance when we just get a cold. I can't imagine how high their insurance would be if Tori had a real issue.

that is a shame....


~~~~Gluten Free since 9/2004~~~~~~

Friends may come and go but Sillies are Forever!!!!!!!

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