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MDRB

Feet?

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I have celiac disease and have been getting a blistery looking rash that consists of clumps of really tiny (about pin point sized) puss filled blisters (sorry to be so graphic). Also it seems to be getting better the longer I am gluten free. My doctor told me that DH usually occurs on the elbows, knees and buttock. However, my rash has occurred mainly on my feet, a little on my hands and slightly on my hips. Does anyone know if DH can show up on the feet, hands and hip? Has anyone else out there experienced this?

Thanks


Australian

Gluten Free Since mid March 2008

As well as gluten I can't eat: cantaloupe, honeydew, dairy and most nuts and seeds. I also seem to have a problem with a lot of fruits and vegetables but only when they are raw.

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While there may be typical areas which exhibit DH, I doubt there are many places where it cannot occur. Your description fits it perfectly, so I'd say it's DH. One thing that can help reduce the severity is to limit iodine intake. The body does need iodine however, so I wouldn't suggest less than the recommended daily intake. I found it helpful to use sun-dried sea salt, rather than the usual stuff you find in the supermarket. Sun-dried salt will not be white, but have some color to it, usually with tiny flecks too. Some are pinkish, others are grayish, or other subtle hues. Your local health food store is the likely place to find it. The reason I think it's better is that salt naturally contains iodine, but mass produced salt is kiln-dried at such high temperatures, that the iodine is destroyed. That's why they iodize it. Apparently the salt is also bleached to make it white. I also read someplace that the iodine which is added to kiln-dried salt actually comes from a residue from petroleum refineries. IMO this is just one reason why thyroid problems are epidemic.

One brand of salt you might look at is RealSalt.

HTH


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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I don't know where they get the idea that DH is limited to such places. Many of us have had it almost any place. Mine started on the calf of one leg, soon I had it on both legs, belly, arms, within days it was also on the tops of my feet, bottom of my feet, hands, neck and face. Before it started going away I had it absolutely everywhere top to bottom. Such misery on top of all of the illness! Hope your clears up soon!


GOD IS GREAT, GOD IS GOOD, THANK YOU FOR OUR GLUTEN-FREE FOOD!

MUSIC IS THE BREATH OF LIFE

Theresa

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Thanks so much for replying!

I'm pretty sure that it is starting to go away, I have had it for a while but just always assummed it was some sort of super resistant fungal thing, but since going gluten free it is definetly clearing up.

I don't eat a lot of salt, are there any other foods with lot of iodine that I should try to avoid?

Thanks again


Australian

Gluten Free Since mid March 2008

As well as gluten I can't eat: cantaloupe, honeydew, dairy and most nuts and seeds. I also seem to have a problem with a lot of fruits and vegetables but only when they are raw.

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Hi again. Iodine can be found in lots of seafoods...watch those, and any foods processed with lots of salt. I find that I have to avoid anti-inflammatories; like Ibuprofen. Those make me blister up. The longer I'm on the gluten-free diet, though, the blisters are fewer and smaller. Hopefully soon it'll be only a bad memory. Keep on healing!


GOD IS GREAT, GOD IS GOOD, THANK YOU FOR OUR GLUTEN-FREE FOOD!

MUSIC IS THE BREATH OF LIFE

Theresa

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Lol,

Well I don't eat seafood and I cut out most processed foods when I went gluten free.

I really appreciate the advice, its good to know that I'm on the right track :D


Australian

Gluten Free Since mid March 2008

As well as gluten I can't eat: cantaloupe, honeydew, dairy and most nuts and seeds. I also seem to have a problem with a lot of fruits and vegetables but only when they are raw.

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I have celiac disease and have been getting a blistery looking rash that consists of clumps of really tiny (about pin point sized) puss filled blisters (sorry to be so graphic). Also it seems to be getting better the longer I am gluten free. My doctor told me that DH usually occurs on the elbows, knees and buttock. However, my rash has occurred mainly on my feet, a little on my hands and slightly on my hips. Does anyone know if DH can show up on the feet, hands and hip? Has anyone else out there experienced this?

Thanks

My daughter was less than a year old when the p%$#@# blisters started to appear on the bottoms of her feet. They were in-between her toes, at the base of the foot, and in the little tiny joint crack where the toe meets the foot. This was one of our earliest indicators that she was a celiac (but of course, we didn't figure it out for another year). Because of the blisters under her feet--which sometimes opened into lesions--she didn't learn to walk until very late in her babyhood. It must've been physically painful for her, and it was heartbreaking for me as a mother.

Now she's five years old, and we've had her on the celiac diet since age two and a half. We fought the blisters with creams, powders, constantly exposing the feet to air... Only one thing got rid of the blisters for good: a completely gluten-free diet. She had to deal with the blisters throughout her toddler years, but once she was completely gluten free, we never, ever saw the blisters again. She now walks, runs, and plays like all the other kids, and her skin is clear and healthy.

I hope my daughter's success story has given you hope.

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One thing I've found that triggers my DH is artificial sweeteners. It took me a long time to figure this one out, but since cutting out everything with an artificial sweetener (including diet soda :unsure: ) the rash has significantly declined. And yes, I get them on my feet too - the best thing when you have a new breakout on your feet is to try to wear sandals and let the air get to them, because if they are cooped up in sneakers all day, it's worse when you take them off at night (plus the itching will drive you nuts!)

Hope this helps!

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