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aprilsun

Is It Dh Or Psoriasis?

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Hello,

I have what appears to be severe plaque psoriasis on my scalp. I went to a dermatologist about 4 years ago (before it got as bad as it is) and she said that is is either dermatitis or eczema. In any even she was not concerned and told me there was not I much I could do about it.

My question is that if it is psoriasis, is psoriasis related to celiac or gluten intolerance?

Thanks,

aprilsun

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I can't answer the DH part, but I know my psoriasis is very reactive to what I eat. So could be gluten related, could be some other food related.


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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My celiac gene, DQ9, in some countries is considered a gene for Psoriasis. I myself have DH, my DD who had to get one copy of my celiac gene as I have two, has psoriasis. Her psoriasis like my DH resolved gluten free. You do want to check and make sure any hair preperations are gluten-free, shampoos, conditioners, hair dye, gels etc.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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I was told by the pharmacist that the dry crusty thick skin on the top of my hands is Psoriasis and then after I went gluten-free it is gone. :lol:


gluten-free/CF 5/8/08

Multiple food Allergies

Chemicle Sensitivity Syndrom

I suposedly have IBS

Psilly page member

Crohns

Celiac (duh)

"My llamas are in me head... "

-Llama`Llady

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Hello,

I have what appears to be severe plaque psoriasis on my scalp. I went to a dermatologist about 4 years ago (before it got as bad as it is) and she said that is is either dermatitis or eczema. In any even she was not concerned and told me there was not I much I could do about it.

My question is that if it is psoriasis, is psoriasis related to celiac or gluten intolerance?

Thanks,

aprilsun

I have psoriatic arthritis. My experience with physicians is that none of them will acknowledge any relationship between gluten intolerance and psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis, although if you read on this forum some members have reported their arthritis and psoriasis going into remission once they stopped eating gluten. Unfortunately it has not happened for me (gluten-free for 7 months, psoriatic arthritis for 5 years). My scalp is covered in scales and if anything it is getting worse, not better. Psoriatic arthritis is an auto-immune disease and evidence exists that gluten can trigger these types of diseases.

And whether it is DH, psoriasis or something else, it would surely be worth a gluten-free trial to see what happens.


Neroli

"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973

Lactose free 1990

(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's

Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007

Soy free March 2008

Nightshade free Feb 2009

Citric acid free June 2009

Potato starch free July 2009

(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009

Legume free March 2010

Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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I have psoriatic arthritis. My experience with physicians is that none of them will acknowledge any relationship between gluten intolerance and psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis, although if you read on this forum some members have reported their arthritis and psoriasis going into remission once they stopped eating gluten. Unfortunately it has not happened for me (gluten-free for 7 months, psoriatic arthritis for 5 years). My scalp is covered in scales and if anything it is getting worse, not better. Psoriatic arthritis is an auto-immune disease and evidence exists that gluten can trigger these types of diseases.

Have you tried eliminating dairy, soy, eggs and nightshades also? I did this, and my psoriatic arthritis went away. For a year, I also eliminated all meat, peanuts, and most legumes. After a year, I added back legumes and nightshades. Now, I just avoid gluten, dairy and soy. The psoriasis has come back, but NOT the arthritis. Just avoiding gluten might not be enough.


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

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Have you tried eliminating dairy, soy, eggs and nightshades also? I did this, and my psoriatic arthritis went away. For a year, I also eliminated all meat, peanuts, and most legumes. After a year, I added back legumes and nightshades. Now, I just avoid gluten, dairy and soy. The psoriasis has come back, but NOT the arthritis. Just avoiding gluten might not be enough.

I eliminated soy in March, have avoided lactose since 1992, but have not given totally dairy free a good trial; gave up my yogurt for several weeks and minimised cheese, sour cream, etc., which do not seem to have any overt adverse effects, and did a three week trial of no nightshades. Challenged myself with tomatoes and reacted immediately, but no reaction last night to some potato. Red pepper seemed okay and I don't like green pepper (maybe because of negative effects) but haven't tried eggplant again. Have never thought to eliminate eggs, meat, nuts (well, I don't eat peanuts anyway), legumes. It doesn't seem to leave a lot left to eat :lol: Your experience is interesting; I am really not sure if I could go the whole hog, so to speak, without working out with a nutritionist what on earth I could eat. Seems to only leave fruit and vegetables and rice (which I don't like to have a lot of). How did you come to the decision to eliminate so many things?


Neroli

"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973

Lactose free 1990

(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's

Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007

Soy free March 2008

Nightshade free Feb 2009

Citric acid free June 2009

Potato starch free July 2009

(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009

Legume free March 2010

Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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