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katie060206

So Many Questions!

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I am newly diagnosed about one week ago. I started gluten free immediately and seemed to be doing ok on the diet so far. My symptoms (nausea, diarrhea, cramping) seem to have subsided, although I am still trying to determine what has gluten in it and what doesn't. I also experience extreme thirst a lot and find myself chewing on ice all the time. Is this something anyone else has experienced? Sorry for the million questions i am trying to figure everything out. All feedback is welcome!!!

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Rather than trying to figure out what has gluten and what does not for the next 12 months, go on a very basic diet right now... I mean plain chicken, rice, green vegetables, eggs. Very basic stuff only. This will help you get back to baseline faster and will help your stomach heal quicker. Despite the fact that you may not be allergic to other regular foods, lots of things are not good for your stomach right now. Every celiac has accidents in the first few weeks and months while they are trying to figure out the diet. Having a plan in place that completely avoids common allergens and aggravating foods will help you get better faster. Otherwise in four months you'll be back here wondering if you are allergic to dairy, soy, etc. Find out now by eliminating them, seeing how you do, and reintroducing them one by one in two weeks.

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I also experience extreme thirst a lot and find myself chewing on ice all the time.

wanting to chew on ice is supposed to be a symptom of iron deficiency

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wanting to chew on ice is supposed to be a symptom of iron deficiency

I heard it was zinc, but it seems iron is the one most doctors associate with it. Apparently a deficiency in either nutrient can cause such a craving.

When people develop unusual cravings they should always be tested for anemia or zinc deficiency. We have heard of other cases where replenishing iron or zinc vanquishes the compulsion to eat ice.

http://www.healthcentral.com/peoplespharmacy/408/60900.html

Many on this board find it helpful to take a few supplements, especially at first. The intestinal damage usually results in malabsorption. Among the most common nutrients to be deficient are magnesium, vitamin B12, vitamin D, calcium, various B vitamins, zinc, and iron. However, it does vary from person to person, and I'm sure many other nutrients can and do become deficient depending on the individual. A multivitamin is also something many on this board seem to be taking.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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Yes, you could be deficient in iron. But do not take a supplement without having your doctor test your iron levels and especially your Ferritin. Ferritin should be at least above 50 with some saying 70-80 is optimal. Optimal levels vary by who you ask. But it certainly should not be below 50. Maybe you have copies of labwork from recent. Did they test Ferritin?

Make sure any supplements you take are Gluten Free.


GLUTEN FREE 4/4/08. LEGUME/SOY FREE 5/15/08. YEAST FREE. CORN FREE. GRAIN FREE. DAIRY FREE. I am eating all meats, eggs, veggies, fruits, squash, nuts and seeds. I just keep getting better every day. :)

Do not let any of the advice given here substitute for good medical care. Let this forum be a catalyst for research. Find support for any post in here before you believe it to be true. Arm yourself with knowledge. Let your doctor be your assistant. Listen to their advice, but follow your own instincts as well. Miracles are within your reach. You can heal!

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