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NorthernElf

The Price Of gluten-free

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Do you think it's overly inflated ???

I'm in Canada. I also live in a smaller center (12000 or so) and I cannot believe the cost of gluten-free. There are certain products I "need". My bread of choice is Kinnikinnick's sunflower & flaxseed bread - I buy the mix and bake it myself (better than the made loaves). I also like their english muffins. I also regularly eat gluten-free rice crackers, Tinkyada pasta, and a lot of brown rice (gluten-free from Costco). The rest of my diet is naturally gluten-free and I do a little baking with gluten-free flours - chocolate chip cookies and Gluten Free Pantry brownies are a favorite. Oh, and tuna or salmon "muffins" made with egg and Kinnikinnick bread crumbs.

Anyway, the flours & products are pricey and I think the biggest price offender is Glutino - I don't buy many of their products. I also tend to avoid Enjoy Life since their prices are high and their products seem miniature (like their bars - so small!).

So what I was thinking is that I buy this stuff at a health food store - mostly - and they are notorious for high prices anyway. I want to try teff flour but not for $8-$9 for a small package. Is it inflated or a just a reflection of a specialty product ???? I'm really hoping that if the new labelling comes out within the year in Canada that gluten-free specialty products might come down in price. I guess to some extent it might not matter so much if labelling shows more options we weren't aware of are out there - ie. if gluten is labelled all we have to do is read. I've never been big on researching products myself - I read the 'net some but I want to be able to make the decision in the store on whether something is safe or not, so I'm sure the labelling will open up some doors for me.

LOL Maybe I'm just bitter but I sure feel like I'm being gouged a lot !!! :unsure:

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I've thought about this a lot. The cost to get a gluten free food manufacturing business off the ground has to be more than any other type. Their raw materials are far more as well, especially when they are avoiding artificial flavorings and opting for organic goods. Many of these products required new equipment that had to be designed and researched. All this for a pretty limited audience compared to say, Oreos. I don't think any of the small manufacturers are bathing in Cristal. :P And all this work can be for nothing if they are sued by someone who has a "reaction." Or for someone to get on this board and say they were glutened by a product. The food business is tough and developing products for a medical condition is even worse.

I really like Glutino pretzels but I cringe each time I buy them! But I really like them!! :lol: So, I'll keep buying them.

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The price of gluten free speciality foods is why I'm doing my best to eat whole foods or foods that are naturally gluten free. I did buy a bag of pancake mix, mainly so that I can make "bread" to take with me to the restaurant so I'm not starving by the time our food arrives.

I haven't found any gluten free frozen pizzas, so I'll probably look for a pizza crust mix and make my own, but beyond that, I'm not buying a lot of specially made gluten free foods.

My "arsenal", as my husband puts it, consists of:

corn tortillas

frozen "naked" chicken tenderloins (to bake for salads or dinner)

sliced lunch mean that is gluten free

vegetables, salads

fruit

tofu, dairy

eggs--I make yummy huevos rancheros with these and the tortillas

popcorn (the kernels, that I pop myself in the microwave

Silk yogurt

dried fruits

Kind bars (gluten free naturally)

If i want something sweet, I make meringues or pudding at home. I don't ask my husband to try to find gluten free cookies, because I know they'd be hideously expensive and I'd probably eat the whole dang box in a day.

I only miss bread when I'm at a restaurant. I bake bread for my family, but honestly, I don't miss sandwiches. I do miss toast a wee bit. I am the only gluten-free person in my home, so it would be really expensive if I were trying to buy/make gluten free bread and pizzas for our family of five. It's just not doable for us right now.

I think it's healthier to eat gluten free without all the replacement products, especially at first.


Negative EMA test 8/08

Gluten free 8/08

Positive response to dietary change

Dairy free 3/09

Citrus free 5/09

Allergies: bananas, apples, green beans, mold.

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Our family is glutin free and for the "specialty" products we splurge on I order from Amazon.

I was in a co-op before and saved money buying in bulk then too.

You can make deals with some of the health food stores. They can give you a discount for buying by the case. The discount it worth it to them because A)gluten free is a life-long customer B)The case does not have employee time wasted on it pricing and shelving it before the sale C) To get the customer in the door will lead to impulse purchases.

I also double batches of everything I possibly can. Freeze at least half in luch or snack size portions.

These are some of the ways I found for saving money when I have to use gluten free products.


Michigan

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I can understand the bussiness point of view well but from a consumers perspective and in charge of finances for me and my nongf free wife I feel guilty when I buy a box of those great tasting Kinnicock "Oreos" when you can buy a normal size box of regular oreos for half the price. This guilt i put on my self cause she always says i should buy what ever i want. I feel though that buying these gluten-free products and the more people are being diagnosed then the prices should drop. Plus like in the previous posts the products are often organic and all natural which I am realizing first hand is better for my and everybodys health.

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I agree. So many times I've been in the store and had to go with a higher price item becaue I'm scared of the cheaper house brand (except when I'm in a Walmart Supercenter...God bless Great Value products).

But even though I might be spending more for some groceries, I usually come back to the same conclusion, that spending a little more now has saved me, probably, thousands or more in medical bills.

Also, I'm saving a LOT by not being able to eat out. Fatty fast foods were always a vice of mine growing up, but for almost 10 years, I've been forced to abstain from them, and that's saved a lot of cash.

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I've noticed the high prices with certain foods, like gluten-free bread and bagels. I just abstain now. With the cost of normal food rising and having 3 growing boys....I made the choice of feeding them or me. My one "treat" comes at my birthday. The boys are sweet and make gluten-free brownies. My husband and I are 3 days apart with our birthdays so they get the cake and I get the brownies. We have separate ovens so one is designated as a gluten-free oven and the other for them.

I understand how businesses need to make money, but if people ate like we do they would be healthier. Too bad more people aren't catching on and wanting more natural ingredients instead of the High Fructose Corn Syrup garbage.

I eat holistically now and my health has dramatically improved. My husband has now become a believer and eats what I do.


Diagnosed Celiac 2004

Diagnosed Gastroparesis 2007

No Diabetes, no hypothyroidism

Reynaud's 2008 official dx (had symptoms since 2004 or longer)

Sjogren's 2008

Looking at lupus and scleroderma

At least I don't have rigor mortis....yet.

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