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jensey

Need Help With Best Diet To Start Off W/in Case Of Otherintolerances

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Recently diagnosed by blood work. Dad has both genes is diagnosed with Celiac and he was recently diagnosed with casein and soy allergies as well.

I am trying to figure out the best, most simple diet that is as nutritionally sound as possible to rule out all other intolerance's. I have been living as Gluten free as possible but because I still work in a bakery some exposure is currently out of my control. In the beginning stages of my disease, before I was diagnosed, DAIRY became an OBVIOUS issue. I lived in denial about that a little longer than the denial I had about gluten.

At this point I have been as gluten free as I can be but often take 2 steps forward and 1 back with regards to my digestive issues. It's better some days and others I feel as though I am still filled with gluten. I KNOW about the free flowing flour in the area I work in so no need to address that specifically, I am working to change that exposure.

What are a few simple things that will sustain me and are a good starting point to have as my diet. How long before I introduce any new foods into that spectrum? I recognize now that a food diary is no longer OPTIONAL and because I am making most items I ingest at home now it wont be as difficult as I thought it might be.

I have been eating meats, soy items, vegan/gluten free items, veggies, fruits, eggs, nuts, beans, quinoa, brown rice... is white rice easier on the digestive tract and on that same note given my main symptom of constant D should I eliminate fiber for awhile?

I do drink on occasion and I wonder if that is hindering my healing as well.

Any suggestions/experiences would be appreciated. Currently I am using many of the diagnoses my father gets about food issues from his doctor as a starting point because I am SOOO his daughter genealogically speaking...he is the one who I likely inherited this from. When we speak his issues are so similar to mine that it seems silly to pay for a Doctor to tell me what he has already paid to find out.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Jen

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Our family's experience with elimination diet..

Eliminate all top eight (fish, shellfish, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, and eggs) and peas along with the gluten free diet (we exclude gluten free oats too).

Keep a food journal.

Two weeks after the elimination, add one of the suspect foods in for a week or two weeks for the test trial.

Try to add in the suspect food as plain as you can, and at a more convenient time for possible reactions.

It is very time consuming and frustrating. Good luck!

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That is excellant advice. I only will add that you shouldn't assume you'll be just like your dad. My daughter is very like me but I totally missed her lactose intolerance as her symptoms were very different from my own. She does tend to be like me but react differently. And she suffers from headaches which I have never had.

I would also say if you suspect something you are eating could be bothering you, challenge it just like the PP outlined. You said you thought alcohol might bother you. I would elimanate it then challenge it. You know our body does speak to us and it might be hinting to you. Can't hurt to check it out.

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Recently diagnosed by blood work. Dad has both genes is diagnosed with Celiac and he was recently diagnosed with casein and soy allergies as well.

I am trying to figure out the best, most simple diet that is as nutritionally sound as possible to rule out all other intolerance's. I have been living as Gluten free as possible but because I still work in a bakery some exposure is currently out of my control. In the beginning stages of my disease, before I was diagnosed, DAIRY became an OBVIOUS issue. I lived in denial about that a little longer than the denial I had about gluten.

At this point I have been as gluten free as I can be but often take 2 steps forward and 1 back with regards to my digestive issues. It's better some days and others I feel as though I am still filled with gluten. I KNOW about the free flowing flour in the area I work in so no need to address that specifically, I am working to change that exposure.

What are a few simple things that will sustain me and are a good starting point to have as my diet. How long before I introduce any new foods into that spectrum? I recognize now that a food diary is no longer OPTIONAL and because I am making most items I ingest at home now it wont be as difficult as I thought it might be.

I have been eating meats, soy items, vegan/gluten free items, veggies, fruits, eggs, nuts, beans, quinoa, brown rice... is white rice easier on the digestive tract and on that same note given my main symptom of constant D should I eliminate fiber for awhile?

I do drink on occasion and I wonder if that is hindering my healing as well.

Any suggestions/experiences would be appreciated. Currently I am using many of the diagnoses my father gets about food issues from his doctor as a starting point because I am SOOO his daughter genealogically speaking...he is the one who I likely inherited this from. When we speak his issues are so similar to mine that it seems silly to pay for a Doctor to tell me what he has already paid to find out.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Jen

I have celiac disease and 6 other food allergies. I do NOT recommend using an 'elimination' diet to guess your other allergies/intolerances. Although many people can have allergies to those 8 common allergy foods, they can have allergies to almost anything. The elimination diet is too 'iffy' and requires unnecessary restriction, which may feel more like deprivation. Restriction without immediate answers may seem overwhelming.

Instead I recommend getting delayed reaction food allergy blood tests, like the ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) test for over 100 different commonly eaten foods. I also took the Enterolab stool tests to diagnose my casein and soy IgA mediated allergies. Every diagnosis I received from those 2 kinds of tests matched my empirical evidence. So, when I ate those foods, I experienced excruciating gut pain or 48 hour tachycardia and nausea (with cane sugar). Knowing I have a medical/lab test diagnosis plus my own empirical experience with the diagnosed allergens helps me confidently and consistently abstain from my allergens. When I abstain, but still get gut reactions, I know that my symptoms come from bacterial dysbiosis in my intestines, rather than allergen reactions. I've had and been treated for 3 different bacteria, a parasite and a fungus. If I had used elimination diets to find my allergens, I might have assumed those bad gut bugs were really allergy reactions.

SUE

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"Instead I recommend getting delayed reaction food allergy blood tests, like the ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) test for over 100 different commonly eaten foods. I also took the Enterolab stool tests to diagnose my casein and soy IgA mediated allergies. Every diagnosis I received from those 2 kinds of tests matched my empirical evidence. So, when I ate those foods, I experienced excruciating gut pain or 48 hour tachycardia and nausea (with cane sugar). Knowing I have a medical/lab test diagnosis plus my own empirical experience with the diagnosed allergens helps me confidently and consistently abstain from my allergens. When I abstain, but still get gut reactions, I know that my symptoms come from bacterial dysbiosis in my intestines, rather than allergen reactions. I've had and been treated for 3 different bacteria, a parasite and a fungus. If I had used elimination diets to find my allergens, I might have assumed those bad gut bugs were really allergy reactions."

Sue,

How is your GI system now? I've read some of your earlier posts and we seem to have some similar problems; I have C and even on gluten-free/DF and other allergen free diet I get bad gut reactions. Did the treatments make a big difference? I'm planning on going on the SCD when I get settled back at school, as it seems like it would address all my problems, but I'm curious about your naturopath experience. Have you tried the SCD? Is there anything else that works for you? Thank you!

Katie

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Sue,

I really appreciate your advice. Your reply sounds more like the answer I was looking for. Having C I recognize that many foods may cause me issues that are not "common allergies". I am so new to this that the names of the tests are helpful so that when I speak to my doctor I can have specific ideas of what I would like to try rather than expecting him to have the best suggestions.

In the mean time what would you suggest as a starting point? Honestly I am getting to the point where eating is no longer enjoyable and I try not to do it unless absolutely necessary. I don't want to run my body down any further, but I can't imagine that my chronic type 7 stools (extreme d...mainly fluid) is getting much nutrients from what I eat anyway. There is a vegan gluten free protein powder type product "Vega" that I am considering making a main staple of my diet as well as simple chicken, rice, potatoes, bananas, peanut butter and apples. My hope is maybe I will get to a type 6 or lower stool, but right now I am frustrated.

I still work in a bakery and I know the flour exposure there, as limited as it is, is likely still causing me issues as well. I am working to change jobs but it won't likely happen until after January unless I get too sick. I don't mean to sound hopeless and sad, I am cool with my diagnosis I just want to know what ELSE is causing me such trouble.

Thanks again for your informative reply.

I wish you well!

Jen

I have celiac disease and 6 other food allergies. I do NOT recommend using an 'elimination' diet to guess your other allergies/intolerances. Although many people can have allergies to those 8 common allergy foods, they can have allergies to almost anything. The elimination diet is too 'iffy' and requires unnecessary restriction, which may feel more like deprivation. Restriction without immediate answers may seem overwhelming.

Instead I recommend getting delayed reaction food allergy blood tests, like the ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) test for over 100 different commonly eaten foods. I also took the Enterolab stool tests to diagnose my casein and soy IgA mediated allergies. Every diagnosis I received from those 2 kinds of tests matched my empirical evidence. So, when I ate those foods, I experienced excruciating gut pain or 48 hour tachycardia and nausea (with cane sugar). Knowing I have a medical/lab test diagnosis plus my own empirical experience with the diagnosed allergens helps me confidently and consistently abstain from my allergens. When I abstain, but still get gut reactions, I know that my symptoms come from bacterial dysbiosis in my intestines, rather than allergen reactions. I've had and been treated for 3 different bacteria, a parasite and a fungus. If I had used elimination diets to find my allergens, I might have assumed those bad gut bugs were really allergy reactions.

SUE

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