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Recipe Tips For Making A Great Gluten Free Pizza?

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Any tips for making a gluten/dairy/oil free pizza?? I sooooo miss the pizzas I use to be able to have from a restraunt the cravings have been so bad. That when I do make a home made pizza it doesn't knock it out. I guess my taste buds still remember how great the "normal" pizzas use to taste:(

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You can order (or find in your area) Grandma Ferdon's frozen pizza crust. It is the best I've ever had. Excellent done on the grill or in the oven.

http://www.grandmaferdons.com/index.htm

Thank you for this recommendation! I just had Kinnick the other day and it was awful! Same w/Nature's highlights. Both gooey inside. I'd resigned myself to the idea of never eating pizza again, and I make a very healthy sauteed veggie pizza that was once a staple. Going to try your fave crust.

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There is a gluten free pizza dough mix by Bob's Red Mill. I had a heck of a time flattening it out because it was so sticky. Even though it was lumpy, it tasted so good I actually ate until I couldn't eat anymore. My boyfriend knows how to make a real pizza crust so he's going to help me make another one. He said that we could use some gluten-free flour on the cutting board to knead it into a ball before flattening it out.

I also tried the gluten-free pizza crusts at Whole Foods (in the freezer) and they weren't too bad, but not as good as the mix.

(I can't remember if there's any oil in it though.)

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With most gluten-free stuff, it seems to be a matter of taste and opinion. I wasn't personally a huge fan of Bob's Red Mill and had a hard time getting it to cook all the way through.

My latest experiement was to make the recipe on Pamela's Products website. She carries my favorite products and they always have the best taste to me. I used her bread mix which comes with a yeast packet.

Here are the directions on the web and see my modifications below:

Crunchy Pizza Crust

1 bag Pamela

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Both my girls and I love the pizza crust recipe I found on http://glutenfreemommy.com/

I noticed you said oil free. Most recipes I have seen have a little bit of oil in them. This is probably a really dumb question - but can you use a shortening (melted) - like Spectrum...or maybe melt a small amount of the Earth Balance sticks? If not - I am not sure what effect leaving out the oil will have on the recipe. It is a very small amount - but sometimes leaving out small amounts matter. Maybe someone more knowledgeable than me can chime in on this one.

We really liked the flavor, and it reminded us of the crust from Papa Johns - if you have ever had that before (we like a more substantial crust). In fact, we melted some butter and added garlic - to dip our crust in. :P I use a spatula to spread the dough on parchment paper, which I put on my pizza stone to bake (what I would use to spread icing - it is a medal blade, thin spatula). This seems to work for me.

Also, while it seems there are alot of steps, it isn't hard and doesn't take that long to make. She just gives you very good and detailed instructions. Don't let that scare you off!!!

If you go to http://glutenfreemommy.com/homemade-pizza/, she has a wonderful picture posted.

GLUTEN FREE PIZZA CRUST RECIPE

1/4 cup millet flour

3/4 cup white rice flour (or use a mixture of brown rice and white rice flour)

1/4 cup sweet rice flour

1/4 cup arrowroot starch (or use cornstarch or more tapioca starch)

1/2 cup tapioca flour

2 teaspoons xanthan gum

3/4 teaspoon salt

1 1/2 Tablespoons sugar

1 teaspoon sugar for proofing yeast

2 1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast

3/4 cup warm water, (heated to 115 -120 degrees)

2 Tablespoons ricotta cheese (for casein free try almond meal)

2 eggs

2 1/2 Tablespoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon red wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar

1 Tablespoon Honey

Note: If you like your pizza dough seasoned, try adding some Italian seasoning to the dough. I like to keep mine plain.

DIRECTIONS:

Place your pizza stone (or pan) in the oven and heat the oven to 170 degrees to get the stone warm. Prepare your liquid ingredients. Mix the olive oil, ricotta cheese (if using almond meal, save and add to the dry ingredients), honey, and vinegar in a med. measuring cup or bowl and set aside so the mixture comes to room temperature. This mixture should not be cold when mixed with the dry ingredients.

Next, combine all the dry ingredients and sift together in the bowl of your stand mixer. I used my paddle (not the dough hook) for this recipe.

Heat 3/4 cup of water until it reaches 115 -120 degrees.

In a separate small bowl, place your yeast and the teaspoon of sugar. Mix with about 1/4 cup of the heated water, stir, and let it sit for a few minutes. Once you know the yeast is active, proceed with the recipe.

At this point, you want to double check and make sure all your ingredients have come to room temperature. Turn the stand mixer (fitted with paddle) on and give the dry ingredients a few twirls. Add the egg, ricotta mixture to the dry ingredients and give it another few twirls. Add the yeast mixture.

At this point, gauge the liquid level. You want the dough to look like stiff cake batter. The dough should still hold the swirls of the mixer, but it should be shiny and not dull. Add the rest of the water slowly until the right consistency is achieved. I used another 1/2 cup - making 3/4 cup of warm water total. Since different brands of flour and measuring techniques vary, it is best to eyeball this and add the water slowly to get the texture you want. You will get good at knowing what gluten free pizza dough is supposed to look like.

Once you have the pizza dough made, take the pizza stone out of the oven. You can turn the oven off at this point and leave the light on in the oven. Fit the pizza stone with parchment paper (do not use waxed paper) and lightly brush olive oil over the parchment paper. With a cake scraper, slowly spread the pizza dough batter in a 12-13 inch circle. You want the batter to be evenly distributed. At this point, you want to create a beautiful crust edge to your pizza. This can be tricky with such sticky dough. Cover your hands in olive oil and shape the edges like you want them. If you find your hands getting too sticky get a little more olive oil on your hands. You don

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Wow, Yum! I'm salivating now. I'm going to try both of these recipes.

Where do you find a pizza stone? & what is it exactly? Does it make a big difference?

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Both my girls and I love the pizza crust recipe I found on http://glutenfreemommy.com/

Wow, thanks for that recipe. I have been searching for one that doesn't have potato starch flour in it. Will try it tonight. :)

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Wow, Yum! I'm salivating now. I'm going to try both of these recipes.

Where do you find a pizza stone? & what is it exactly? Does it make a big difference?

A pizza stone (or baking stone) is a round (or square), flat stone (can't think of another way to describe it!). It is not metal, does not have a lip, is about 1/2 inch thick, is beige or light khaki in color and is made of stone. I love my stones for baking anything! Things bake evenly on the stones and I normally do not have a problem with sticking or cookies over browning (aka - burning!) on the bottom - which almost always happens to me when I use metal cookie sheets. I have not tried spreading the dough from the pizza dough recipe I posted directly on the stone though. Not sure if that would stick or not - so I just spread it out on parchment.

Baking stones also come in casserole dishes as well as bread dishes. They can be a little spendy (thinking around $30 or so - at least from Pampered Chef) - but they last forever and bake wonderfully.

My stone happens to be from Pampered Chef - and I have had it for years. But you can find them at Target or stores like that (I don't remember if I have seen them in Wal-Mart - I don't think I looked there for one). I have seen them at department stores in the cookware aisles (like Belk - a new store we have down here).

I love my stone - and if something happened to it - I would replace it instantly. I use mine weekly!! :-)

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A pizza stone (or baking stone) is a round (or square), flat stone (can't think of another way to describe it!). It is not metal, does not have a lip, is about 1/2 inch thick, is beige or light khaki in color and is made of stone. I love my stones for baking anything! Things bake evenly on the stones and I normally do not have a problem with sticking or cookies over browning (aka - burning!) on the bottom - which almost always happens to me when I use metal cookie sheets. I have not tried spreading the dough from the pizza dough recipe I posted directly on the stone though. Not sure if that would stick or not - so I just spread it out on parchment.

Baking stones also come in casserole dishes as well as bread dishes. They can be a little spendy (thinking around $30 or so - at least from Pampered Chef) - but they last forever and bake wonderfully.

My stone happens to be from Pampered Chef - and I have had it for years. But you can find them at Target or stores like that (I don't remember if I have seen them in Wal-Mart - I don't think I looked there for one). I have seen them at department stores in the cookware aisles (like Belk - a new store we have down here).

I love my stone - and if something happened to it - I would replace it instantly. I use mine weekly!! :-)

Thank you. I am going to look for one on my way home. I have an 8 hour drive through some big cities. I am craving pizza so bad. I also found online that there is a gluten free pizza place that I'll be driving by. I am so looking forward to stopping there. :P

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