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CGally81

L-glutamine

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Months back, I discovered the joys of L-glutamine. People recommended it for if you get glutened, plus it's known for being able to repair the damage done to the gut, and it's an appetite suppressant. Though on the other hand, taking too much could result in it affecting the liver somehow, resulting it you having to go off it for a while.

I noticed that if I got glutened, taking L-glutamine would VERY quickly cure the symptoms in a real hurry. It took less than an hour; maybe less than a half hour.

Does this also work if you have reactions to casein? I'm trying to figure something out. If my on-and-off headaches are affected by casein (and they may not be - I had a very large BM last night and the dull headache I had went away), then it would make sense that L-glutamine would stop them. After all, it stopped my glutening symptoms - I take it, and the brain fog, D, and everything go away, and the rapid blood sugar drop doesn't occur. But it didn't affect the headaches.

Is this because L-glutamine targets glutenings but not caseinings (or soyings for those who have that problem; I appear not to)? Or is it because the headaches were not caused by L-glutamine?

I'd like to know more about L-glutamine in general too. I only keep it around as an emergency protection against glutenings, but I wonder if it could help as an appetite suppressant later on if I want to lose weight or reduce possible cravings for the wrong kinds of foods. What do you know about L-glutamine, and its safety as a long-term supplement?

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Just in case this is helpful, glutamine is one of 20 amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. It is a "non essential" amino acid as it is available in food. L-glutamine is often dosed intravenously for patients recovering from gastric surgery. It is consumed quickly in the intestines, and is needed to repair intestinal damage caused by celiac disease.

L refers to the molecule's chirality, which is the difference between your left and right hand. "D" is for dextrorotatory, where "L" is for levorotatory

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chirality_%28chemistry%29

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glutamine

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ (search for glutamine)

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Just in case this is helpful, glutamine is one of 20 amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. It is a "non essential" amino acid as it is available in food. L-glutamine is often dosed intravenously for patients recovering from gastric surgery. It is consumed quickly in the intestines, and is needed to repair intestinal damage caused by celiac disease.

L refers to the molecule's chirality, which is the difference between your left and right hand. "D" is for dextrorotatory, where "L" is for levorotatory

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chirality_%28chemistry%29

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glutamine

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ (search for glutamine)

Thanks for the links. I'd read the Wikipedia article before, but I didn't notice this interesting quote before:

Most eager consumers of glutamine are the cells of intestines, the kidney cells for the acid base balance, activated immune cells and many cancer cells.

So let's see, what could this mean? The intestines consume the glutamine, thus being healed. And the activated immune cells consume it, thus being stopped from attacking the body? Is that what this could mean?

That might explain why L-glutamine both heals damage caused by gluten, and stops the autoimmune reaction. If that's the case, it should work similarly for casein and soy, for those who have problems with the two. The only way to be sure is for someone who got caseined or soyed to take L-glutamine and see if it helps.

This might mean that my headaches aren't caused by a caseining, after all. (And they've largely been getting better in the past few days when I cut calcium - and dairy - out of my diet. I wanted to know whether it was the calcium or the casein/dairy that was causing them) It may also mean that since I'm not reactive to casein, if I'm not at least, then my hunger shouldn't spike again if I remove dairy from my diet.

Any more information on L-glutamine's effects on gluten, casein and/or soy would help, but I appreciate what you linked up. Thanks.

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I didn't know L-Glultamine acted against glutenings--but it does make sense! I will try it next time something like that happens to me. Thank you!

I used to take L-Glutamine regularly since it made me feel really good--last thing at night kind of thing. I read somewhere it had anti aging properties. Now looking at my books I see its good against auto immune problems as well as for the intestines. Its also good for the brain and as you implied decreases sugar cravings--as well as alcohol. Mainly however it is used to help out the muscles and is thus good for athletes -- as well as for invalids since it counteracts muscle waisting. It also enhances mental functioning. It can be found in raw spinach and parsley.

I believe its safe to take (though maybe wise to go off it once in a while) unless (as I have just been reading) you have kidney problems, diabetes, cirrohsis of the liver, Reye's syndrome or any kind of excess ammonia in your system. So I stopped taking it a year and a half ago when I had a recurrence of kidney problems.

What I use instead is NAC--N-acetylcysteine. It helps the body make its own glutathione--a powerful antioxidant produced in the liver. It helps detoxify the liver and protects both red and white blood cells. It also helps with carbohydrate metabolism and breaks down oxidized fats. It is good for the nervous system as well as against atherosclerosis. This is another anti-aging substance.

I like to take it with R-lipoic acid--a very powerful anti-oxidant that I especially like to use when I work out since it counteracts sore muscles. It also speeds up the mitochondria and thus is another effective anti aging supplement. It helps normalize blood sugar levels (I tend to be hypoglycemic--but it also good against diabetes symptoms--especially insulin resistance). I just read its also excellent against stroke damage in animals (blood deprivation to the brain)--and probably humans. It helps against nerve damage,

atherosclerosis and blindness.

These last two supplements are (from what I have read and heard) perfectly safe by the way.

Bea

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So let's see, what could this mean? The intestines consume the glutamine, thus being healed. And the activated immune cells consume it, thus being stopped from attacking the body? Is that what this could mean?

I didn't know L-Glultamine acted against glutenings--but it does make sense! I will try it next time something like that happens to me. Thank you!

Actually, it hasn't been shown to work quite like that. Studies have not indicated that L-glutmamine stops T cells from attacking. L-glutamine supplementation has been shown to aid in healing in the stoumach/intestines, where it seems to be a limiting factor. L-glutamine is only a building block for protein, that can be in short supply in parts of the body that have been injured, etc. :P

But if it make folks feel better, that is a good thing!

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