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srfjeld

Recently Diagnosed

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On Friday my naturopath told me I have celiac disease. Since I've come out to friends about it I've been getting information overload. One person told me I'd have to throw out my toaster b/c it's contaminated, and possibly think about getting new pots and pans, cutting boards and throwing out mayo jars, etc... b/c they've all been contaminated. Another friend (with little knowledge of celiac) told me that since I've been living with this for the past 15 years or so, my case isn't severe (though I have many, many symptoms I'm now finding out are gluten related)and I don't have to be as extreme. Any thoughts on this? Do I need to throw out the old and bring in the new with my new way of living?

Thank you,

Stephanie

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It's probably a good idea to use a toaster that has a removable and therefore washable rack. Get rid of pots and pans that are pitted, otherwise they should be ok, but apparently some people who are very sensitive to any sort of cross contamination have to have their own cookware. You should get yourself a new cutting board and not use wooden spoons or any implements that are scratched or worn. Are there still people in your household who will need that old bread board, toaster, and the mayo? Those things can still be used by them, but you will need to get your own jars of food that they won't touch.

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You need to be ruthless getting gluten out of your kitchen so your body can heal. As Rucko said, a lot of us discard anything that cannot be thoroughly cleaned. Pots, dishes, and utensils clean up easily as long as they're not cracked and in good shape. Porous things like wooden spoons or cutting boards will not clean up and it's best to get new ones. Toaster ovens with crumb trays and removable racks can be cleaned up, but the vertical ones are a problem.

As far as condiments, look at this as an opportunity to clean out the fridge. Don't use anything that might have had a bread-crumb covered knife or crackers dipped in it like mayo, jelly, peanut butter, relish, ketchup, dip, or your old stick of butter. If you share your kitchen with family, label old jars for them to use up and you to avoid. Squeeze container packaging is good if you're sharing condiments with family members. Otherwise, depending on how careful they are, you might want your own containers.

As far as severity, your friend is not correct. If you're really celiac with the autoimmunity (as opposed to gluten intolerant) it doesn't matter how many or few symptoms you have. Gluten is a dangerous thing for you to eat, even in small amounts you might not react to. Small amounts of gluten can keep the autoimmune damage going.

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On Friday my naturopath told me I have celiac disease. Since I've come out to friends about it I've been getting information overload. One person told me I'd have to throw out my toaster b/c it's contaminated, and possibly think about getting new pots and pans, cutting boards and throwing out mayo jars, etc... b/c they've all been contaminated. Another friend (with little knowledge of celiac) told me that since I've been living with this for the past 15 years or so, my case isn't severe (though I have many, many symptoms I'm now finding out are gluten related)and I don't have to be as extreme. Any thoughts on this? Do I need to throw out the old and bring in the new with my new way of living?

Thank you,

Stephanie

Yes, decontamination is an important part of converting to gluten free, especially if you are going to be living in a shared kitchen. Those to whom it does not matter do not understand how small an amount of contamination can affect a sensitive person. The reason you have still been having symptoms is probably because you have been having low level contamination all along. I'm sorry, I interrupted this response for dinner, and some other folks have already responded, but you should probably trust the first advice rather than the second one. Until you determine your level of sensitivity, you can't be too careful.

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be as strict as you can be. the smallest bite or a cross contamination will keep you from healing. its worth it to replace everything. its worth it to avoid all possible contact with gluten. best wishes! :)

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If the package says gluten free does that mean it is automatically wheat free?

Thanks!

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If the package says gluten free does that mean it is automatically wheat free?

Thanks!

Weelll, not necessarily. There are other parts of the wheat plant that do not have gluten' Wheatgrass, for example. And I found a product that had wheat stems in it. Now how they would keep it from being gluten contaminated is another question.

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LDJofDenver, thank you. I hadn't thought about my old hand mixer being a contamination source, but of course it is! Well, this is the push I needed to recycle my ancient, avocado green (really!) hand mixer. Out with the old! I did thorougly clean my VitaMix, though. :lol:

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