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Joe0123

Changing Kitchen Utensils; Is It Necessary?

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So I've been gluten-free (and many other things too) for quite some time and though its helped some, I don't feel that great given how long I've been on this diet and how strict I've adhered to it. It got me thinking that maybe I should change all my kitchen utensils but that would be somewhat expensive. What do ya'll think about changing pots and pans? Is that far enough? Do I need to change silverware, containers, measuring cups as well? I'd appreciate any and all input.

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I will tell you a cautionary tale. We have a condo that we rent out in the winter (furnished) and occupy in the summer. Over the winter we have no idea what gluten atrocities are committed in our kitchen. I have discarded all wooden utensils, we get a new toaster every year, but we can't afford all new pizza pans, baking pans, etc., every year. Every year when we return I scrub them all out well, but every year for the first three or four weeks I have digestive upsets (I am not overly sensitive, neither is hub). After that things seem to settle down. (We have thrown out scratched non-stick and don't have any metal utensils :P ) But it does make a difference :(

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Thanks for the reply. Anybody else?

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Thanks for the reply. Anybody else?

I did replace a lot of kitchen stuff like scratched Teflon pots and pans, wooden spoons, cutting boards, toaster (that would be a must), old ancient Tupperware...things I knew I'd never get clean. I kept my Calphalon pots and pans and just scrubbed them real well, as well as casseroles, glass baking dishes, etc. Not everything has to be expensive nor does it all have to be replaced at once. Replace the obvious like your toaster, wooden spoons, cutting boards, etc. If I could get it clean, I kept it.

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If I could get it clean, I kept it.

This was my motto as well. It had to be a product I could take a scouring pad to. I did not change any metal utensils. Threw out the wooden spoons and cutting board and scratched up nonstick skillets. New cutting board, strainer, toaster . . .

The only conainer that I got rid of was the one that held my (wheat) flour. Quite frankly, I probably could have cleaned that one as well . . . it was just a psychological thing where I felt like I would never be able to get it clean. ;)

I did buy new cookie sheets . . . the old had the baked on brown oil marks (know what I mean?) that I suppose someone out there would have enough elbow grease to remove but I didn't.

You could always try an experiment of just using plastic utensils for a week and one or two pots/pans that you are absolutely sure of.

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The only conainer that I got rid of was the one that held my (wheat) flour. Quite frankly, I probably could have cleaned that one as well . . . it was just a psychological thing where I felt like I would never be able to get it clean. ;)

I did buy new cookie sheets . . . the old had the baked on brown oil marks (know what I mean?) that I suppose someone out there would have enough elbow grease to remove but I didn't.

I taped my flour canister shut and threw it in the garbage. :ph34r:

I didn't replace my cookie sheets as they were fairly new and I wasn't much of a baker before. But I have fallen in love with parchment paper. Aluminum foil is also my friend. :)

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What about pans that have a ceramic coating on the inside? I scrub out everything really well with hotwater and clean everything really well.

I have to replace the toaster and perhaps some wooden spoons (or get my own and stash them somewhere to where i can have them when cooking).

Are cutting boards a big must to replace? We have some and they get just as scrubbed as the pans and we never cut bread on them (we have a bread slicer for it).

(sorry for hijacking the thread :) i figured perhaps it was best to post in a preexisting one as opposed to making a new one)

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I'm curious about this one too - I've replaced stoneware and cutting boards and have my own separate toaster. Anything scratched and plastic is out. I'm acquiring my own full set of cooking utensils too. I'm mostly replacing things in stages because, as mentioned, it is ridiculously expensive to go out and re-furnish your whole kitchen. I still use our same stainless steel pots/pans. I must admit that the more I replace the better I feel. I'm contemplating making our whole house a 'gluten free zone' to see if that helps too. If nothing else maybe it would cut down on the confusion of having two of everything. Hope this helps!

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I have stainless pots/pans, and our cutting boards are dishwasher safe Epicurean brand composites. If a kitchen can't go in the dishwasher I don't buy it <ahttp://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/uploads/emoticons/default_wink.png' alt=';)'> I haven't dared use the wood spoons but I am targeting them for replacement with these. For non-stick cooking I use carbon steel omelette pans and cast iron. Those I scrubbed out with steel wool after heating them super hot after I went gluten-free. They can take the abuse! Actually my carbon steel pan is phenomenally slick with a touch of oil - eggs don't leave a trace on it. Iron and carbon steel pans are cheap cheap cheap and you can often score them for a few bucks at yard sales. Run them thru the self-clean cycle of your oven, scrub with steel wool, re-season, and you're good to go.

I haven't added a 2nd toaster yet. My wife will cook waffles etc for her and the kids in it but I haven't noticed any gluten exposure from sharing it. It's a toaster oven (i.e. no scraping of bread going in and out) and crumbs never seem to stick to the grill inside.

The metal cookie sheets also got the steel wool treatment. So far so good although I haven't baked much yet...baked goods still seem a little depressing.

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what did you replace your wooden spoons with? Your link is blocked from this forum apperently :(

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what did you replace your wooden spoons with? Your link is blocked from this forum apperently :(

I haven't quite ordered them yet, but they're Tovolo brand mixing spoons: stainless steel handles, firm silicone rubber spoon. $8-10 ea, not too bad. Here's the manufacturer's page, hopefully this won't be blocked.

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Hey Joe,

I'm still new to gluten-free, but have been thinking the same thing lately about my cookware at home. I'm actually going to ikea after work tonight to get some new stuff. It's not the greatest cookware in the world (matches my cooking skills! :lol: ), but it get's the job done and is cheap.

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but every year for the first three or four weeks I have digestive upsets (I am not overly sensitive, neither is hub). After that things seem to settle down. (We have thrown out scratched non-stick and don't have any metal utensils :P ) But it does make a difference :(

Have you considered it could be the change of water? I understand that simply changing water supply can do this, you could try bottled water next time, see if it makes a difference.

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